Wednesday, May 30, 2012

Weathervane Wednesday ~ Welcome to New Hampshire



This is part of an on-going series of photographs of weather vanes in the Nutfield, New Hampshire area (formerly Derry, Londonderry and parts of Hudson, Windham and Manchester).  Some of the weather vanes are historical, some are whimsical, and all are interesting.   Today's weathervane is somewhere in Salem, New Hampshire.

Do you know the location of weather vane #45?   Scroll down to the bottom to see the answer!





Today's weathervane can be found at the information booth just over the New Hampshire and Massachusetts border off Route 93,  before exit 1 in Salem, New Hampshire.  I love the green patina on the copper banner, the outline of the state of New Hampshire and best of all the "Old Man of the Mountain"!  The state shape and the Old Man's profile are reversed in the shot I took from the parking area.  

Click here to see the entire collection of Weathervane Wednesday posts!

-----------------------
Copyright 2012, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Tombstone Tuesday ~ The Wilkinson Cemetery in Gilford, NH


Nearly a year ago a very kind volunteer at www.FindAGrave.org photographed the Wilkinson Cemetery in Gilford, New Hampshire for me, and gave me permission to post the photos on this website.  Last month we were attending a funeral in Alton, New Hampshire.  We decided to mosey home around Lake Winnipesaukee instead of going directly home.  Along the way we passed through the town of Gilford, and I mentioned to my husband that somewhere in town there was a cemetery full of Wilkinsons.  Just before we entered the town of Laconia he spied the cemetery along the side of route 11B.  What serendipity that we decided to take the long way home!

Photos are great, but its even better being there in person!






My previous blog post about the Wilkinson Cemetery http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2011/07/tombstone-tuesday-wilkinson-cemetery.html

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Copyright 2012, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Sunday, May 27, 2012

Windham, NH ~ World War II Honor Roll



A TRIBUTE TO THE MEN
& WOMEN WHO SERVED THEIR
COUNTRY FROM WINDHAM, IN
WORLD WAR II
1941 – 1946

EVANS JOHN J, CAPT.
GALLAGHER WILLIAM F., CAPT.
CAMPBELL ALAN M, 1ST LT.
FOSTER EVERETT C., 1ST LT
MYERS PAUL R., C. W. T.
ARMSTRONG ROBERT A, T/SGT
SYKES WILLIAM W., T/SGT.
HERBERT EDWARD N., S/SGT.
LAMSON PAUL M., S/SGT.
MANOLY ALEXANDER, S/SGT
PAGE ROLLIN A ., S/SGT
CRONIN THOMAS A., SGT.
EVANS PAUL D., T.M.I/C
GODDARD ELI L., SGT
HAMER H. LOWELL JR, T/4
HEMEON HOWARD J., GT.
HERRICK CLIFFORD J., T/4
JAROSKY WALTER, SGT
JONES EDWARD A., SGT
LONGBOTTOM MARGERY M., PH. M. I/C
LYNCH EDMUND S., SGT
MASON ROBERT P., JR. Y I/C
MEYERS NORMAN W., Y I/C
MYERS PAUL R., JR., MO. M. M. I/C
OTIS GEORGE N. S.C. (B) I/C
PETERS HARRY C., T/4
TARBELL WILBUR E., E.M. I/C
ACKERMAN ROBERT A., M. M. 2/C
EASSON CHARLES A., T/5
EVANS ARTHUR R., CPL
EVANS RONALD H., PH. M. 2/C
HAMER KENNETH W., E. M. 2/C
HAMER, RUSSELL M. CPL
JAROSKY CHESTER, T/5
LAMSON WESLEY A., T/5
PARKER WALLACE O., M. M. 2/C
SCROGGINS JOEL E., CPL
TAREILA JOHN, T/5
TILTON ROBERT F., T/5

ZALGENAS BEN, S.C. 2/C
GLANCE THEOPHIL L., MO M. M. 3/C
WATERHOUSE THOMAS 3RD, S.C 3/C
WENDELL CHARLOTTE J., PH. M. 3/C
BLANCHARD WILLIAM B. A
BOURQUE FRED A. ,          A
BROWN STEPHEN H.,       A
BUTLER WILLIAM F.,         A
CHENEY JOSEPH,               N
ELA GEORGE E.,                N
EVANS WAYNE T.,            N
GRAHAM FREDERICK M., A
GREELEY EARLE V.,          N
JACOBS JOHN W.,            A
JOHNSON DOUGLAS S.   A
JOHNSON GEORGE W.,   A
JONES JOHN R.,                A
LAMSON JOHN A. JR       A
LEHTO KULLERVO            A
LUZON HENRY K.,            A
MARKEWICH JOHN B,    A
OTIS BYRON S.,               A
PATNAUDE GEORGE W., A
ROULSTON ARTHUR A,   N
SANDBERG FRANK V,     A
SANFORD EDGAR S.       A
TELLIER PAUL H.,        A
TOKANEL PETER         A
VAYENS ARTHUR JR.  A
VAYENS WILLIAM L.,  N
WEBSTER GEORGE K.  A
WEBBER FORREST R.   A
WRIGHT GEORGE        A

MERCHANT MARINES
HOLLETT GRAHAM LT. COM
HOLLETT ALEC W., LT
WHIDDEN EDWIN E., LT. R. O
Windham Historical Society website http://www.windhamnewhampshire.com/updated/museum.htm

Click here to see all the military honor roll transcription projects at Nutfield Genealogy and other genealogy blogs: http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2011/11/veterans-day-transcription-project.html

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Copyright 2012, Heather Wilkinson Rojo


Saturday, May 26, 2012

Windham, NH ~ World War I Honor Roll




A TRIBUTE
TO THE MEN & WOMEN
WHO SERVED THEIR
COUNTRY FROM
WINDHAM
IN THE WORLD WAR
1917 – 1918

ALLEY, CAPT. RICHARD MELSWORTH MEDICAL
SCOTT, SERG., HAROLD WINFIELD INFANTRY
HARRINGTON, SERG. ERNEST A. S. INFANTRY
AWARDED DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS
TRENHOLM, CORP. ROBERT INFANTRY
ALLEY, ROBERT ELWOOD AMUNITION TRAIN
BAILEY, WALTER ASA  MARINE
BAKER, MRS. JULIA M.  RED CROSS AMBULANCE
BOULANGER, JOSEPH ARTILLERY
DROUIN, ARTHUR E. DIED AT CAMP DEVENS
GARLAND, RALPH NATHANIEL  MEDICAL
GILSON, HENRY EARL   NAVAL RESERVE
HASKELL, MARK HENDERSON  ENGINEER
HOWARD, ALBERT J. ARTILLERY
O’MEARA, STEPHEN   CO. 1 MASS
SCOTT, DORRANCE    NAVY
TRENHOLM, ARTHUR  AVIATION
ZINS, JR. PETER A.   MILITARY POLICE

Windham, NH French & Indian War honor roll
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2012/05/amanuensis-monday-windham-new-hampshire.html

Photograph courtesy of Joan Normington, Windham, NH Historical Society.
Windham Historical Society website http://www.windhamnewhampshire.com/updated/museum.htm

Click here to see all the military honor roll transcription projects at Nutfield Genealogy and other genealogy blogs: http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2011/11/veterans-day-transcription-project.html

--------------------
Copyright 2012, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Friday, May 25, 2012

The Battle of Noddle's Island


From the Library of Congress G3764.B6S3 1775 .D4
 Vault
g3764b ar090000
http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.gmd/g3764b.ar090000

This was just a teeny skirmish during the American Revolution, but I love it because the marsh and the island where it happened belonged to some of my ancestors, and some of the people involved are right out of my family tree. As I tell the tale of the Battle of Noddle’s Island (sometimes known as the Battle of Chelsea Creek, or the Battle of Hog Island), I’ll point out the family ties.

Noddle’s Island is now where Boston’s Logan airport sits.  The land around it has been filled in, and it is no longer an island.  One of the first settlers to live here was Samuel Maverick, and in the 1630s his house was located near Maverick Square in East Boston, today.   There is a “Maverick Station” on the blue line of the T (the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) subway) in this part of East Boston.  Samuel Maverick (b. about 1602) is the brother to my 10 x Great Grandfather, Moses Maverick (1611- 1686). 

Chelsea Creek, Rumney Marsh and Pullen Point, all land near these islands, was settled by my Bill Family ancestors in the 1600s.  They lived and farmed also on the island that is now known as the town of Winthrop, Massachusetts.  Rumney Marsh and Pullen Point are in the current cities of Chelsea and Revere Massachusetts. Other ancestors from the Belcher, Cheever and Tuttle, and Hitchings families lived here, too.
 
Fast forward 150 years, and the second battle of the American Revolution happened here.  Or rather, a skirmish happened here.   The British were going up and down the coast causing trouble by confiscating gunpowder and supplies, including hay cut and stored on islands, as well as livestock that used to roam the islands safe from predators and poachers.  On 27 May 1775, just a bit more than a month after the Battle of Lexington and Concord, New Hampshire’s own General John Stark was in charge of burning the hay and supplies on Noddle’s and Hog Island so the resources wouldn’t fall into enemy hands.  The British saw the smoke from Boston, and came out to investigate.

British General Gage sent out the schooner Diana, which misjudged the depth of the marshy waters and foundered in the mud.  Dr. Joseph Warren (of Bunker Hill fame) and General Israel Putnam (married to my 1st cousin, 7 generations removed, Hannah Pope) arrived on foot with a troop of soldiers from Stark’s 1st New Hampshire Regiment.  Although the British tried to fire their cannons at the rebels, the cannons were pointed towards the mud because of the listing ship, and so there was a standoff.  When the British finally abandoned ship, the colonial soldiers stripped the ship of everything of value: artillery, guns, sails, money, anything not nailed down.  They put the hay the British wanted under the Diana and set it ablaze.

No one died.  It wasn’t much of a battle, but it was great for Boston’s morale to destroy a British warship.  Lord Percy wrote back to England “ "The rebels have lately amused themselves with burning the houses on an island just under the admiral's nose; and a schooner, with our carriage-guns and some swivels, which he sent to drive them off, [had] unfortunately [ran] ashore, and the rebels burned her."  [The Boston Harbor Islands: A History of an Urban Wilderness, by David Kales, The History Press, 2007, page 46]
The guns and supplies from the HMS Diana were used by the Americans at the Battle of Bunker Hill a few weeks later.

It is always fun to read more about these little skirmishes, and to find out who was there.  In the Chelsea, Massachusetts Historical Society there were many details about this battle, and also in the book A Documentary History of Chelsea, by Mellen Chamberlain, Jetty C. Watts, and William R. Cuttler, published by the Massachusetts Historical Society, 1908. A few years ago, an article in the Boston Globe got me interested in learning more about the Battle of Noddle’s Island: “In Chelsea, hunt is on for remains of lost Revolutionary War ship”, by Steve LeBlanc, Associated Press reporter,  Boston Globe,  20 July 2009 http://articles.boston.com/2009-07-20/news/29261040_1_battle-schooner-ship   Investigating this little story led to discovering the places, names and stories of many ancestors!

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Copyright 2012, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Windham, NH ~ Civil War Honor Roll





A TRIBUTE TO THE MEN OF
WINDHAM WHO SERVED IN
THE WAR OF THE REBELLION
1861 -  1865

McCONNEY WILLIAM H. LIEUT
BRADFORD JOHN G. SERGT.
HUNTLEY SETH N. SERGT.
SULLIVAN DAVID SERGT
CHELLIS HENRY W. CORP
CROWELL JESSE C. CORP.
EVERETT JOSIAH H. CORP.
FEGAN CHARLES E. CORP.
HUNT HORACE W. CORP.
McCONIHE LEWIS A. CORP.
ANDERSON WILLIAM
BAILEY CHARLES E.
BATCHELDER JAMES G.
BEAN ASA
BURNHAM WALTER J.
CARR GEORGE W.
CLARK THEODORE
COBURN GEORGE W.
COWEN WENTWORTH S.
DURANT GEORGE W.
FESSENDEN DAVID B.
GLEASON HORATIO
GOODWIN ALBION K.
HALL JOHN W.
HANCOCK HARVEY
HASELTINE SAMUEL


HILLS JOHN C.
JAQUITH GILMAN
JOHNSON JOHN G.
JONES JAMES
KIMBALL MICAJAH B.
MARDEN LEMUEL
MYRICK MOSES
NORRIS TRUEWORTHY
PHILLIPS REUBEN O.
PLUMMER CHARLES H.
RICHARDSON WHITING R.
RIPLEY LEWIS
STEPHENS JAMES S.
STONE JAMES G.
WILEY CALEB G.
WYMAN MOSES

Photograph courtesy of Joan Normington, Windham, NH Historical Society.
Windham Historical Society website http://www.windhamnewhampshire.com/updated/museum.htm

Click here to see all the military honor roll transcription projects at Nutfield Genealogy and other genealogy blogs: http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2011/11/veterans-day-transcription-project.html

--------------------
Copyright 2012, Heather Wilkinson Rojo


Wednesday, May 23, 2012

Windham, NH ~ War of 1812 Honor Roll




A TRIBUTE TO THE MEN
OF WINDHAM, WHO SERVED
IN THE WAR OF 1812
1812 – 1815

DAVIDSON SAMEUL 1ST LIEUT.
NESMITH THIMAS, 3RD LIEUT.
HILANDS JOHN B. CORP.
DURRIER DAVID, MUSICIAN
BALCH WILLIAM
BLAISDELL STEPHEN E.
BLANCHARD BENJAMIN
CAMPBELL DAVID
CLARK MATTHEW
CORLISS SOLOMON
COTTLE WOODBRIDGE
DANFORTH PHINEAS
DINSMOOR ROBERT P.
DISMOOR SAMUEL
DOW AMOS
DOW RICHARD
GALT DANIEL M.
GORDON ALEXANDER
KNIGHT
MARSHALL SAMUEL
MOORE THOMAS
PATTERSON RUFUS
ROWELL SAMUEL
SARGENT MOSES
SENTER AARON
SIMPSON JAMES
SIMPSON WILLIAM

Photograph courtesy of Joan Normington, Windham, NH Historical Society.
Windham Historical Society website http://www.windhamnewhampshire.com/updated/museum.htm

Click here to see all the military honor roll transcription projects at Nutfield Genealogy and other genealogy blogs: http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2011/11/veterans-day-transcription-project.html

--------------------
Copyright 2012, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Tuesday, May 22, 2012

Windham, NH ~ Revolutionary War Honor Roll






A TRIBUTE TO THE MEN
OF WINDHAM, WHO SERVED
IN THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR
1775 – 1783

CLYDE JOSEPH, CAPT.
GILMORE JAMES, CAPT.
COCHRAN ISAAC, LIEUT.
GILMORE JAMES, JR. LIEUT.
GREGG DAVID, LIEUT.
GREGG JOSEPH, LIEUT.
SENTER,      LIEUT.
RIED ABRAHAM, LIEUT.
GRAHAM ALEX, 2D LIEUT.
MORISON JOHN, 1ST SERGT.
DAVIDSON DAVID, SERGT.
DAVIDSON JAMES, SERGT.
DICKEY DAVID, SERGT.
DINSMOOR ROBERT, SERGT.
HOPKINS JAMES, SERGT.
KYLE EPRAIM, SERGT.
MCILVAINE WILLIAM, SERGT.
MORISON SAMUEL, SERGT.
LADD ELIPHALET, SERGT
THOM BENJAMIN, 3RD SERGT.
DICKEY WILLIAM, ENSIGN
COCHRAN JOHN, CORP.
McCOY JOHN, CORP.
MORROW ALEXANDER, CORP.
DINSMOOR ROBERT, JR. FIFER  CALLED RUSTIC BARD
ANNIS CHARLES
ANNIS EZRA
ARMOUR JOHN
BOLTON WILLIAM
BROWN ALEXANDER
BROWN  JAMES
BURROWS NATHANIEL
CABRUIS BARTHOMOMIE
CALDWELL  JAMES
CALDWELL  JOHN
CALDWELL JOSEPH
CALDWELL THOMPSON
CALWELL SAMUEL
CAMPBELL ARCHIBALD
CAMPBELL DAVID
CAMPBELL HENRY
CAMPBELL JAMES
CAMPBELL JOHN
CAMPBELL SAMUEL
CLARK GEORGE
CLOUGH DAVID
CLYDE DANIEL, JR
CLYDE WILLIAM
COCHRAN JOHN
COLLINS THOMAS
CORLISS JOSEPH
DARRAH ARTHUR
DARRAH WILLIAM
DARRAH WILLIAM S.
DAVIDSON JESSE
DICKEY JAMES
DINSMOOR JOHN
DINSMOOR SAMUEL
DUNLAP ADAM
DUNLAP THOMAS
DUTY MARK
DUTY WILLIAM
EASTMAN JAMES
GILMORE JOHN
GORDON WILLIAM
GRAHAM HUGH
GRAHAM JOHN
----

GREGG ALEXANDER
GREGG THOMAS
HALL EBENEZER
HADLEY STEPHEN
HALLOWELL JOHN
HARDY JACOB
HEPHILL JAMES
HEMPHILL NATHANIEL
HOPKINS AARON
HOPKINS JOHN
HOPKINS ROBERT
HUGHES JOHN
JAMESON JOHN
JOEL JOHN
JONES EDWARD
KARR THOMAS
KINKEAD JOHN
KITTREDGE ASA
KYLE JAMES
LADD TIMOTHY
McCOY WILLIAM
McILVAINE DANIEL
McILVAINE EBENEZER
McILVAINE JAMES
McKEEN WILLIAM
McMASTERS ALEXANDER
MANSFIELD JOHN
MARSHALL JOSEPH
MERRILL ROBERT
MONTGOMERY JOHN
MOORE HUGH
MORELAND JAMES
MORELAND WILLIAM
MORRIS MOSES
MORISON ROBERT
NEVINS DAVID
PARK ALEXANDER
PARK JOSEPH
PLANETT ABRAM
POLLEY JOSEPH
QUINTON DAVID
SHEDD NATHANIEL
SHEDD WILLIAM
SIMPSON ALEXANDER
SIMPSON JOHN
SIMPSON WILLIAM
SMILEY DAVID
SMILEY JOHN
SMILEY WILLIAM
SMITH WILLIAM, JR
SPEAR SAMUEL
STUART JOHN
STUART ROBERT
THOMPSON JAMES
THOMPSON JAMES S.
THOMPSON JONATHAN
THOMPSON PAUL
THOMPSON SAMUEL
VICKSHAM NICHOLAS
WAUGH JAMES
WAUGH ROBERT
WAUGH WILLIAM
WILLIAMS JOHN
WILSON GEORGE
WILSON JAMES
WILSON THOMAS

Click here to see the Windham, NH French & Indian War Honor Roll
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2012/05/amanuensis-monday-windham-new-hampshire.html 

Windham War of 1812 honor roll
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2012/05/windham-nh-war-of-1812-honor-roll.html

Photograph courtesy of Joan Normington, Windham, NH Historical Society.
Windham Historical Society website http://www.windhamnewhampshire.com/updated/museum.htm

Click here to see all the military honor roll transcription projects at Nutfield Genealogy and other genealogy blogs: http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2011/11/veterans-day-transcription-project.html


--------------------
Copyright 2012, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Monday, May 21, 2012

Amanuensis Monday ~ Windham, New Hampshire Honor Rolls

In 2010  I started a transcription project to transcribe the war honor rolls or memorial lists on the Londonderry Town Common.  Then I transcribed some of the honor rolls in Derry at MacGregor Park.  This Memorial Day week I will post the honor rolls from Windham, New Hampshire.  Instead of being outside in a park or on the common the Windham honor rolls are inside the Armstrong Building (the old library), which is now the Town Museum run by the historical society.

Today I will begin with the plaque that honors those who fought in the French and Indian Wars.  One name is listed at the bottom for the Mexican War, too.




A TRIBUTE TO THE MEN
OF WINDHAM, WHO SERVED
IN THE FRENCH AND INDIAN WARS
1744 – 1763

GREGG DAVID, CAPT.
MORISON SAMUEL, LIEUT.
THOMPSON SAMUEL, SERGT
CALDWELL WILLIAM
CAMPBELL DAVID
CAMPBELL WILLIAM
CASWELL RICHARD
CLYDE SAMUEL
COWAN JAMES
DINSMOOR JOHN
DINSMOOR ROBERT
DUNLAP HUGH
DUNLAP JAMES
DUNLAP THOMAS
GALT WILLIAM
GILMORE JAMES
GREGG JOHN
GREGG WILLIAM, JR
KINKEAD JOHN
KINKEAD ROBERT
KINKEAD WILLIAM
McADAMS JOHN
McADAMS WILLIAM
McdONNELL JOHN
McKEEN WILLIAM
MANN JAMES
MANN ROBERT
MORISON HALBERT
MORISON JOHN
MORROW JOHN
PARK JOSEPH
QUINTON HUGH
QUINTON WILLIAM
SMILEY HUGH
SMILEY WILLIAM
STUART JOHN
STUART ROBERT
TEMPLETON MATTHEW
THOMPSON HUGH
THOMPSON JAMES
THOMPSON SAMUEL
THOMPSON WILLIAM
TRUMBALL WILLIAM E.
VANCE JAMES

MEXICAN WAR

Photograph courtesy of Joan Normington, Windham, NH Historical Society.
Windham Historical Society website http://www.windhamnewhampshire.com/updated/museum.htm

Click here to see all the military honor roll transcription projects at Nutfield Genealogy and other genealogy blogs: http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2011/11/veterans-day-transcription-project.html

--------------------
Copyright 2012, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Sunday, May 20, 2012

2012 NH Mayflower Society Scholarship Luncheon

The Society of Mayflower Descendants in the State of New Hampshire was pleased to announce four Memorial Scholarship winners at the May 19, 2012 luncheon at Newick's restaurant in Dover, New Hampshire.   Our scholarship recipients are Lisa Demaine who will study civil engineering at the University of New Hampshire, Thomas Masison who will study pre-med at the University of New Hampshire, Julia Moy who will study neuroscience at Vassar College, and Roger Wayne Weeks who will attend Keene State College.

NH Mayflower Governor John Payzant, Roger Weeks,  Lisa Demaine,
Julia Moy, Thomas Masison and NH Mayflower Scholarship Chair Heather Rojo

The speaker at the meeting was Ann Beattie, past president of the Isles of Shoals Historical and Research Association who spoke about four centuries of historical facts and about the natural wonders on these scenic islands off our coast.

Ann Beattie

For more information on the New Hampshire Mayflower Society, and the 2013 scholarship program,  please see the website www.nhmayflower.org.

----------------------
Copyright 2012, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Saturday, May 19, 2012

Surname Saturday ~ Buckley of Salem, Massachusetts


BUCKLEY
In prosecution of this warant 
I have apprehended and brought the bodyes of 
Sarah Buckley and Marye Withredg and Rebekah 
Jacobs all of Salem velage according to the tener of 
the within written warrant: and have Likewise made 
delegant sarch at the house of Daniell Andrew and 
at the house of Georg Jacobs for them Likewise but cannot find them
p me *Jonathan Putnam Constable in Salem
Essex County Archives, Salem -- Witchcraft Vol. 1 Page 114 )
Dated 14 May 1692


William Buckley was a shoemaker.  He lived in Ipswich, Massachusetts between 1657 and 1674, and in Salem Village from 1681 to 1702.  They were prosperous at first, but their property was seized when they lost a lawsuit brought against them by the governor, Simon Bradstreet.  One of his sons was involved in another suit, and as payment William Buckley lost his table, chest and possibly his cobbler’s tools in the seizure.

In 1681 the Buckley family sold their plot of land and became homeless.  They wandered and begged in the streets.  In 1692 Sarah and her widowed daughter, Mary Withridge, were arrested for witchcraft.  William Buckley convinced two pastors to speak in favor of his wife when she was arrested for witchcraft in 1692.   The Rev. William Hubbard stated "I have known the wife of William Buckley of Salem Village... ever since she was brought out of England, which is above fifty years ago... She was bred by Christian parents.... admitted as a member into the Church at Ipswich (of which he was the pastor) above forty years since.  I never heard from others, or observed by myself, anything of her which was inconsistent with her profession, or unsuitable to Christianity."  Sarah Buckley was still sent to prison.

After the trials were ended, those who had been arrested were released from jail as long as they could pay the room and boarding fees.  The very poor languished in prison, even though they had been declared innocent.  William Buckley spent his last shilling paying £10 to release his wife and daughter from jail after the Salem witch trials.  They had spent eight months in jail.

He survived another ten years after the witch trials, in obvious poverty.  His pastor, Rev. Joseph Green made the following entry in his diary: "January 2, 1702. Old William Buckley dyed this evening. He was at meeting the last Sabbath, and dyed with the cold, I fear for want of comforts and good tending. Lord forgive! He was about eighty years old.  I visited him and prayed with him on Monday and also ye evening before he dyed. He was very poor but I hope had not his portion in this life."

Mary Buckley, William’s daughter, was my 7x great grandmother.  In 1694, two years after the witch trials, she married Benjamin Proctor.  Interestingly, he was the son of John Proctor, and the stepson of Elizabeth (Bassett) Proctor, who were both arrested for witch craft and sentenced to be hung when found guilty. John Proctor was hung, and Elizabeth escaped execution because she was pregnant.  It seems that these families of the Salem accused and executed all had a close bond after the witch trials ended, and this bond seemed to last for a generation or two with many intermarriages.

My BUCKLEY lineage:

Generation 1:  William Buckley, probably born in England, died 2 January 1702 in Salem Village, Massachusetts; married Sarah Unknown.  Eight children.

Generation 2: Mary Buckley, born about 1664, died on 5 November 1748 in Danvers; married on 10 December 1694 in Lynn to Benjamin Proctor, son of John Proctor, executed as an accused witch, and Martha Unknown.  He was born on 10 June 1659 in Ipswich, and died in 1717.  Four children.

Generation 3: John Proctor married Lydia Waters
Generation 4: Lydia Proctor married Jonathan Flint
Generation 5: John Flint married Phebe Flint
Generation 6: Olive Flint married Luther Simonds Munroe
Generation 7: Phebe Cross Munroe married Robert Wilson Wilkinson
Generation 8: Albert Munroe Wilkinson married Isabella Lyons Bill
Generation 9: Donald Munroe Wilkinson married Bertha Louise Roberts (my grandparents)

For more information on the Buckleys:

The Salem Witch Trials Transcription Project at http://salem.lib.virginia.edu/home.html  or use this link to search for specific names http://salem.lib.virginia.edu/texts/salemSearch.htm  The image above was from this website. 

“Sarah Buckley wife of Richard Ingersoll and Joseph Proctor of Essex Co, MA 1650 – 1705”, The American Genealogist, Volume 79, Issue 4, pages 274-7

------------------------
Copyright 2012, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Friday, May 18, 2012

Friday Funny ~ Weird Search Terms for my Blog


I collect all the strange search terms readers use to reach my blog.  Using Google, Bing, Yahoo, Mocavo and other search engines, they all end up somehow at my blog.  I can see them on my statistics page.  Believe it or not, these are the actual word-for-word search terms!  I have not idea how some of these ended up at "Nutfield Genealogy".

Genealogy exercise gym in San Francisco  [someone please tell me if this is true!]

Ben Franklin and his coffin  [ ?  ! ]

pics of people born in navarra spain   [apparently Google understands “pics”?]

good pics of Liliuokalani  [again, why use the word “pics”?]

Practice chart write report give me six generations tree   [Is that you, Yoda?]

Sanderson Sisters Salem [ Disney movie buffs will scratch their heads at this one]


Images searched online that actually landed on my blog website ….

Photo of William Tuttle 1635 [ ?  ! ]

Photo of Abiah Folger  [Ben Franklin’s mother]

Photo of Boston 1784  [really!]

1799 photos of Lowell MA  [not only is the year strange, but Lowell didn’t exist at this time]

Photo of the 1760 Boston fire  [only a time traveler with a camera ….]

Moses Platts 1673 Mayflower [no, he wasn’t on the Mayflower, and it sailed 53 years earlier]


Questions on Google?

Who photographed the Mayflower leaving England?   [Again, what’s with the time traveler theory?]

Where is Ben Franklin buried in Boston?  [He’s not!  He’s buried in Philadelphia!]

What is my great great grandmother’s enumeration district?  [I’ll forward this to Steve Morse]

Did my grandmother have any kids?   [She must have had at least one!]

Who is that genealogist on TV?  [I swear it wasn’t me… ]

What is the Blaisdell genealogy numbering?  [huh?]

Who is that famous woman genealogist?     [I’m too humble to take credit for this one]

Who is my great uncle?   [OK, I’m good, but I’m not that good!]

Who do I think I am?  [Send this one to Lisa Kudrow]


This one showed up this morning and I just had to add it in at the last minute....


Where do I find my grandfather's grave online? 


Click here to see my past "weird search term" post:
2011 http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2011/06/weird-search-terms-2011.html

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Copyright 2012, Heather Wilkinson Rojo 

Thursday, May 17, 2012

Two Cousins


Can you guess these two famous cousins of mine?  Both were named “Benjamin”.

Both men grew up within twelve miles of each other, near or in Boston, Massachusetts.  They were contemporaries and lived through the American Revolution.  One was considered a patriot, and one a traitor.

Both men were scientists, and both invented household items like stoves and forms of central heating.  Both were honored by European Scientific Societies.  Both developed theories in thermodynamics.

Both men were philanthropists and endowed educational pursuits in America.

Both men had illegitimate children.  

Both men were statesmen and politicians.  Both were honored in European royal courts.  One took a title of nobility, and the other refused to take a title.  Both were also considered philosophers.

I don’t know if they ever met, and neither was related to the other, but both are my first cousins, one 6 generations removed, the other 8 generations removed.

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Cousin #1, Benjamin Thompson AKA Count Rumford

If you have a can of Rumford Baking Powder on your shelf, you have seen his silhouette.  He was born in Woburn, Massachusetts on 26 March 1753, the son of Benjamin Thompson and Ruth Simonds.   Ruth was the sister to my 5x great grandfather, Caleb Simons (1720 – 1811).    At age thirteen he was apprenticed to a Salem merchant, where he learned mathematics and the physical sciences.  When the merchant lost his business due to the strained relations between Britain and the colonies, Benjamin Thompson returned home to Woburn to work in a dry goods store.  He eventually became a school teacher and took a few classes at Harvard.

In 1772 he served as a British major in a New Hampshire regiment.  When the war broke out he sided with the Loyalists.  When the British evacuated Boston in March 1776 he fled to England and left his New Hampshire wife behind.  He was elected to the Royal Society in 1779.  He returned to America briefly during the war and was knighted in 1784.  He served the Prince of Bavaria for the next 18 years (the Prince was a relative of King George of England). 

He was made a count of the Holy Roman Empire, and took the name “Count Rumford” for his former wife’s hometown (Rumford was the former name of Concord, New Hampshire). He was married to the widow of the famous chemist Lavoisier.  He wrote the theory that heat was a form of motion, and was the father of thermodynamics.  The Rumford fireplace was one of the inventions that changed chimney design forever after making rooms smoke free.  He endowed the Rumford chair of science at Harvard and the Rumford Medals of the Royal Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.  He is buried in the Auteuil Cemetery in Paris, France.

Cousin #2 Benjamin Franklin

Benjamin Franklin is the better known of the two cousins.  He was born on 6 January 1706 on Milk Street in Boston, the son of Josiah Franklin and Abiah Folger.  Abiah was the sister of my 7x great grandmother, Bethshua Folger (born about 1650 on the island of Nantucket).   Benjamin Franklin was the youngest son of a soapmaker.   At age 12 he was apprenticed to his brother James, a printer.  At age 17 Benjamin Franklin ran away to Philadelphia to start a new life.

In Philadelphia he became a printer, and started a subscription library in 1731.  This library continues today as The Library Company, a research library with rare books and manuscripts. He became a Freemason and entered into a common-law marriage with Deborah Read.  He had an illegitimate son, William, who would become the last Loyalist governor of New Jersey.

Franklin became an author, first with Poor Richard’s Almanack, and then he became an inventor.  He never patented his creations, which included the lightning rod, the Franklin Stove, and bifocal glasses.  He became postmaster, and founded the American Philosophical Society.   He was awarded the Royal Society’s Copley Medal in 1753 and 1756 for his work with electricity.   In 1753 he was awarded honorary degrees from both Harvard and Yale.

Politically active, he traveled to London many times as a delegate for Pennsylvania against the Stamp Act.  He became a delegate to the Second Continental Congress and a member of the committee that drafted the Declaration of Independence. Following the Revolution he was Ambassador to France and minister to Sweden.   In 1787 he was a delegate to the Constitutional Convention. 

Benjamin Franklin died 17 April 1790 in Philadelphia and left 1,000 pounds to both Boston and Philadelphia for education to be used 200 years after his death.   Philadelphia’s portion had grown to more than $2 million and they spent it on scholarships, while Boston’s portion grew to almost $5 million which was used to found the Franklin Institute of Boston. 

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President Franklin Delano Roosevelt stated that Sir Benjamin Thompson ( Count Rumford), Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson were “the three greatest minds America has produced”.

Click here for a previous post on the "Count Rumford House" in Woburn, Massachusetts: http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2012/05/count-rumford-house.html

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Copyright 2012, Heather Wilkinson Rojo



Wednesday, May 16, 2012

Weathervane Wednesday ~ Another Eagle


This is part of an on-going series of photographs of weather vanes in the Nutfield, New Hampshire area (formerly Derry, Londonderry and parts of Hudson, Windham and Manchester).  Some of the weather vanes are historical, some are whimsical, and all are interesting.

Do you know the location of weather vane #44?   Scroll down to the bottom to see the answer!




This very grand eagle weather vane sits on top of a bell tower on a grand residence off Mammoth Road in Windham, New Hampshire, near the Londonderry border.  Last week I featured a whimsical weather vane with two cats on the cupola of an outbuilding on this same property.  Usually eagles weather vanes are found on civic buildings, but this elegant house can carry the theme well!  It was built in 1750 as a mill, and there is a dam, waterwheel and bridge over Beaver Brook in the backyard.

Here is a spectacular video of the Mill House decorated for Christmas, by WMUR, our local TV station:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kz6M5XeCHQk

Weather vane #43 was also located here, atop the carriage house behind the main house: http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2012/05/weathervane-wednesday-two-cats.html


Click here to see the entire collection of Weathervane Wednesday posts!


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Copyright 2012, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Founder's Park, Hampton - She has 17 names!


This reader hit the jackpot!  Karen K., the author of the genealogy blog "The Road Backward" at http://www.theroadbackward.com/ has seventeen of the surnames on the stones in Hampton, New Hampshire's Founder's Park in her family tree!  Batchelder, Dow, Drake, Godfrey, Green, Healey, Hussey, Marston, Moulton, Page, Palmer, Perkins, Prescott, Sanborn, Towle, Tuck and Weare.

I don't have room for all of those stones here, but I'll post a few:


DRAKE- Robert Drake was baptized at Halstead,  Essex, England in 1581.  Tradition says that he followed his sons to New England, but there is no proof.  He is seen first in the records of Exeter, New Hampshire, and then he settled in Hampton by 1645/6.  After I posted this, reader Chris Laabs Klauer commented that Robert Drake is her ancestor, too!  She is the author of the blog "Remembering Family" http://rememberingthefamily.blogspot.com/(see comments)


GODFREY- William Godfrey lived at Dedham, Massachusetts before removing to Hampton.  He was made a freeman here in 1640, and bought a house in 1648.  He became a deacon of the church in 1660 and held the position until his death in 1671. 


TUCK- Robert Tuck left England in 1636 and lived in Watertown and Salem, Massachusetts.  In 1638 he petitioned the court in Boston to live in Winnacunnet (Hampton).  He was granted land in 1644 and ran an "ordinary"- an inn for lodging, stabling and entertainment.  

Reader Lori Thornton, author of the blog "Smoky Mountain Family History" http://familyhistorian.blogspot.com/ commented on Facebook that she is the descendant of Perkins, Dearborn, Taylor, Sanborn, Batchelder, Gove and Tuck.  Most of those names have already been published in one of the posts I have done this week. 

My first post on Founder's Park, May 10, 2012 (here you will find the list of 43 surnames memorialized by the surname stones):
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2012/05/founders-park-hampton-new-hampshire.html

My second post on Founder's Park, May 11, 2012:
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2012/05/founders-park-some-family-names-to.html

My third post on Founder's Park, May 14, 2012
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2012/05/founders-park-more-family-names.html

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Copyright 2012, Heather Wilkinson Rojo