Wednesday, December 31, 2014

Weathervane Wednesday ~ A very accurate model motorcycle

Weathervane Wednesday is an on-going series of photographs I post weekly.  I started by publishing weather vanes from the Londonderry area, but now I've been finding interesting weather vanes all across New England.  Sometimes my weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are interesting. Often, my readers tip me off to some very unique and unusual weather vanes, too!

Today's weather vane is from Concord, New Hampshire.

Do you know the location of weather vanes #189? Scroll down to see the answer!




Today's weather vane was seen on Route 3 in Concord, New Hampshire at the Heritage Harley Davidson dealership.  It is a very intricately detailed three dimensional Harley motorcycle.  You can even see the rearview mirror and the spokes on the tires.  I drove by, spotted this weather vane and had to make a uey to go back and get a photo!  I love this one!

Heritage Harley-Davidson has been open since 1982 and is the last second generation local family owned and operated Harley-Davidson dealership in New Hampshire.

Heritage Harley-Davidson, Concord, New Hampshire http://www.heritageh-d.com/


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The URL for this post is
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/12/weathervane-wednesday-is-on-going.html

Copyright (c) 2014, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Tuesday, December 30, 2014

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Ann Kelso, died 1754, Londonderry, New Hampshire

This tombstone was photographed at the Forest Hill Cemetery in East Derry, New Hampshire.


HERE LYES THE BODY OF MRS
ANN KELSO WIFE TO MR
ALEXANDER KELSO
DIED SEPTEMBER 4 1754 AGED
45 YEARS

Ann McMasters was married to Alexander Kelso on 27 December 173? by Reverend Thomas Thompson of Londonderry, New Hampshire.  Alexander Kelso was from Northern Ireland and he died on 15 September 1754, just eleven days after Ann died on 4 September 1754.   They had seven children- Margaret, Jonathan, William, Daniel, Alexander, Ann, and Elizabeth. 

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The URL for this post is
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/12/tombstone-tuesday-ann-kelso-died-1754.html
Copyright (c) 2014, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Monday, December 29, 2014

January 2015 Genealogy and Local History Event Calendar


January 2, Friday, noon – 1pm, Survival: Boston 1630, part of a new series of First Friday Brown Bag Lectures at the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts, FREE, presented by Rose A Doherty, registration required online at http://shop.americanancestors.org/products/survival-boston-1630?utm_source=twgnewsletter&utm_medium=newsletter&utm_campaign=twg718&pass-through=true (click on “Add to Cart” and check out, total will be $0.00).

January 7, Wednesday, 10 – 11am, New Visitor Tour of the New England Historic Genealogical Society Library Building, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts, FREEE.  No registration needed.

January 10, Saturday, 9am – 5pm, Building Community through Oral History, at the Hopkinton Town Library, 61 Houston Drive, Hopkinton, New Hampshire, A hands-on, one day workshop with historian Jo Radner will guide participants through designing oral history projects, effective interviewing, and preserving community stories.  Participants will leave with a repertoire of useful skills and a manual for future reference. Registration required.

January 10, Saturday, 3 - 6pm, Old Newbury Day Open House, at the Spencer-Pierce-Little Farm, 5 Little's Lane, Newbury, Massachusetts, celebrate the official purchase of the town of Newbury on 13 January 1701 with a tour of the 1690 manor house, hot cider and donuts in the visitor center, and then walk to the nearby town sponsored bonfire.  Call 978-462-2534 for more information. 

January 12, Monday, 6:30pm, Lost Boston, Author Talk, at the Charlestown branch of the Boston Public Library, by local author Anthony Sanmarco about the 68 losses to the Boston landscape including the Molasses Tank, Haymarket Square, Scollay Square and others he outlined in his new book.  FREE to the public. 

January 12, Monday, 7pm, Treasure from the Isles of Shoals:  How New Archaeology is Changing Old History, at the Stratham, New Hampshire Fire Department, 2 Winnicutt Road, Stratham, New Hampshire.  FREE to the public, contact 603-778-0434 for more information.

January 14, Wednesday, 6pm, Early American Crime & Criminals by author Anthony Vaver, at the Abbey Room of the Boston Public Library, Boston, Massachusetts.  Vaver shares stories from his books about British convicts sent to America, and stories about pirates, counterfeiters and murderers. Free to the public. 

January 14, Wednesday, 7pm Family Stories: How and Why to Remember and Tell Them, at the Merrimack Public Library, 470 Daniel Webster Highway, Merrimack, New Hampshire, presented by storyteller Jo Radner.  Snow date January 15 same time and place.  Free to the public.  Call the library for more information 603-424-5021.

January 16, Friday, 10:15am, A Woman That Keeps Good Orders: Women, Tavern Keeping, and Public Approval,  at the Community Church of Durham, 17 Main Street, Durham, New Hampshire, FREE to the public.  Please join in for coffee at 9am with the program to follow at 10:15am,

January 17, Saturday, 7pm, Colonial New Hampshire, presented by the Walpole Historical Society, at the Walpole Town Hall, 34 Elm Street, Walpole, New Hampshire, FREE to the public.  Call 603-756-3449 for more information.

January 17, Saturday, 10:30am to noon, Lecture- Lindencrest at the Millyard Museum, 200 Bedford Street, Manchester, New Hampshire presented by historian Ed Brouder, Free to members, regular admission fee for non-members, call 603-622-7531 for more information.  Lindencrest was an elegant mansion in the Queen city, and in the 1890s it was the scene of a scandal involving a widow, her teenaged daughter, a respected doctor and a bank executive who fled to South America.

January 17, Saturday, 2 – 3pm, Winter Weekends at the Phillips House, at the Phillips House Museum, 34 Chestnut Street, Salem, Massachusetts. $5 Historic New England members, $10 non members. Enjoy hot cocoa and cookies while viewing film clips of the Phillips family engaged in their favorite winter activities.  Tour the house to see family items usually not on display, including sporting equipment, postcards, photographs and artwork.  Registration required, call 978-744-0440 for more information. 

January 19, Monday, 2:15pm, Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire, at the Havenwood Heritage Heights Auditorium, 33 Christian Avenue, Concord, New Hampshire.  FREE to the public, Call 603 -229-1185 for more information.

January 28, Wednesday, 6pm, Get started on your Family History, at the Abbey Room of the Boston Public Library, Central Library.  Genealogist Rhonda McClure outlines the first steps to uncovering your genealogy.  FREE to the public.  

January 31, Saturday, 2 - 3pm, Sporty Saturday at the Phillips House, 34 Chestnut Street, Salem, Massachusetts, $5 Historic New England members, $10 nonmembers.  Kick off Super Bowl Weekend with a viewing of historic family films showing events like the Harvard football games and the Boston Marathon, canoeing and camping.  Registration required, please call 978-744-0440.  

February 11, Wednesday,  6pm, The Eliot School and the Catholic Exodus of 1859, by historian Alex Goldfeld at the Abbey Room of the Boston Public Library, Boston, Massachusetts.  Goldfeld explores the 1859 incident of a Catholic schoolboy who was severely beaten for not reciting the required Protestant prayers in a Boston public school classroom.  Free to the Public. 

February 25, Wednesday, 6pm Paddy on the Net: Using Irish Genealogy Databases, by genealogist Michael Brophy, at the Abbey Room of the Boston Public Library.  Brophy will discuss the many resources now available online for discovering your Irish ancestors.  Free to the Public. 

March 11,  Wednesday, 6pm Life Stories in White and Black from Forest Hills Cemetery, by historian Dee Morris at the Abbey Room of the Boston Public Library, Boston, Massachusetts.  Morris will describe the famous abolitionists and black citizens buried together at Forest Hill Cemetery - including William Lloyd Garrison, Edward Everett Hale, William C. Nell, and others.  Free to the public. 

April 29, Wednesday,  6pm, Sex, DNA and Family History, a lecture by Shellee Morehead at the Abbey Room of the Boston Public Library, Boston, Massachusetts.  Certified genealogist Shellee Morehead will explain genetic genealogy- the use of DNA for defining ancestral relationships.  Free to the Public. 

May 13, Wednesday, 6pm, Women and Physical Culture in Nineteenth Century Boston, a talk by Helaine Davis and Linda Stern at the Abbey Room of the Boston Public Library, Boston, Massachusetts.  This lecture is about how several pioneering women changed the face of sports and recreation in Boston at the close of the 19th century.  Free to the public.

May 27, Wednesday, 6pm, Finding Living Ancestors: Being a Genealogy Gumshoe, by genealogist Michael Maglio.  A discussion on how sometimes it is necessary to find a living relative in order to track down records, get a DNA sample, return a rare photo or family Bible, but finding the living can be as challenging as finding a dead ancestor.  Free to the public. 



On television!

Genealogy Roadshow, season 2 premieres January 2015 on PBS.  Check your local listings for times and channels in your area.
http://www.pbs.org/program/genealogy-roadshow/

Who Do You Think You Are? on TLC new season premiere on Tuesday, 24 February 2015 at 10 EasternTime, 9 Central.  
http://www.tlc.com/tv-shows/who-do-you-think-you-are 

Coming Soon!

New England Regional Genealogy Conference - NERGC- Providence, Rhode Island, at the Rhode Island Convention Center, 15 - 18 April 2015.  www.nergc.org

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The URL for this post is
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/12/january-2015-genealogy-and-local.html

Copyright 2014, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Saturday, December 27, 2014

Surname Saturday ~ BALCH of Beverly, Massachusetts

Balch House, Beverly, Massachusetts, circa 1679
operated by the Beverly Historical Society

BALCH

I’m glad to be writing about John Balch now, especially since I attended the Balch family reunion in Beverly, Massachusetts this fall, and at this meeting the newest edition of the Balch genealogy was debuted (see below).  It’s always fun to see your own name in print (check out pages 668 and 743!)  I’m also glad to write about the Balch family because the homestead of John Balch is still standing and is located just a few blocks from where I grew up in Beverly, Massachusetts.   For twelve generations in a row this lineage has lived in the city of Beverly.

John Balch arrived in the New World as part of the Dorchester Company, which came to Cape Ann, Massachusetts to fish.  Some of these men decided to stay and settle, and eventually joined the colony at Salem headed up by Conant. These families are known as “The Old Planters”.  According to Charles Edward Banks in his book Planters of the Commonwealth, John Balch arrived in 1624 aboard the Zouch Phenix, a consort of the Unity, with the Balch, Woodbury and Gardner families.  Other Old Planter families include Trask, Jeffrey, Palfrey, Allen, Norman and Knight.  I descend from the families highlighted in yellow.

John Balch was granted land in Salem and in the area that is now the city of Beverly, Massachusetts. This land was bequeathed to his wife Annis/Agnes and to his oldest son Benjamin (my 8th great grandfather).  This is the land where the Balch house still stands, operated as a museum by the Beverly Historical Society.  Archeological digs in the front yard show that a much earlier house once stood there, probably John Balch’s original homestead.

Benjamin Balch married Sarah Gardner, the daughter of another Old Planter.  All his children were born in the Balch house.  He was married three times.  The Balch family was only slightly involved with the 1692 Salem witch hysteria.  There is a deposition by the wife of Benjamin Balch, Junior against Sarah Bishop, and a mention of the Balch family in a deposition by Mary Gage against Dorcas Hoar of Beverly.  Benjamin’s son, Freeborn Balch (1660 – 1729), married Miriam Moulton, who brother, John Moulton, was married to Elizabeth Corey, the daughter of Giles Corey who died while being tortured to confess as a witch on 19 September 1692 in Salem.

For the truly curious:

Descendants of John Balch, by Robin Balch Hodgkins (an update to Genealogy of the Balch Family in America by Galusha Balch, 1897), published by the Beverly Historical Society, Beverly, Massachusetts, 2014.

The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620 - 1633, by Robert Charles Anderson, New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, Massachusetts, 1995, page 84 -86.

My Balch Genealogy:

Generation 1:  John Balch, born in England and died 25 May 1648 in Salem, Massachusetts; married first to  Margery Unknown (mother of his children), she died 1682; he married second to Annis Unknown.   Three children.

Generation 2:  Benjamin Balch, born about 1628 in Beverly, died after January 1715 in Beverly, married first about 1650 to Sarah Gardner (mother of his children), daughter of Thomas Gardner and Margaret Frier; married on 5 February 1688/9 in Marblehead to Abigail Clarke; married third 15 March 1691/2 in Beverly to Grace Mallet.  Eleven children.

Generation 3:  Mary Balch, born about 1667 in Beverly, died 12 March 1737 in Beverly; married on 26 March 1689 in Beverly to Nathaniel Stone, son of Nathaniel Stone and Remember Corning.  He was born 15 September 1663 in Salem and died 23 February 1741 in Beverly.  Nine children.

Generation 4: Josiah Stone m. Dorithy Fuller
Generation 5: Josiah Stone m. Martha Ashby
Generation 6: Josiah Stone m. Susanna Hix
Generation 7: Eunice Stone m. Peter Hoogerzeil
Generation 8:  Peter Hoogerzeil m. Mary Etta Healey
Generation 9: Florence Etta Hoogerzeil m. Arthur Treadwell Hitchings
Generation 10: Gertrude Matilda Hitchings m. Stanley Elmer Allen (my grandparents)

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The URL for this post is
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/12/surname-saturday-balch-of-beverly.html

Copyright © 2014, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Friday, December 26, 2014

“The Fabulous Holts”

The Holt family plot at Oahu Cemetery, Honolulu, Hawaii
In 1954 Clarice B. Taylor wrote up a series of articles about the Holt family in Hawaii and had them published in the Honolulu Star-Bulletin from June 3rd to September 11th.  These stories are based on the history of the Holt family from Robert William Holt (1792 – 1862) born in England, married first in New England, and removed to Hawaii, married second to a native Hawaiian, and beyond as the numbers of descendants grew and grew.  They are not based on fact or proven by genealogical standards, but are a fun read because they are stories, not just dates, places and names.

Lisa Ululani Holt, a descendant, has transcribed all “The Fabulous Holts” articles and made them available as a PDF file.  As she states in her forward “Families all have their stories.  Much like the game‚ "telephone‚" where you whisper something to one person and it moves down the line, those stories can get distorted.  Such are the stories of the Holts.”

As Lisa, and other Holt descendants, and myself (a relative of Robert William Holt’s first wife, Ann Marie Stanwood Jones (1811 – 1832) ) all work on the Holt family genealogy, this document holds important clues as we sift through all the story details for facts, myths, and narratives.  For example, in Chapter 2, on page 2, it mentions that Robert William Holt left England for Boston, Massachusetts to be with a sister, Mary, around 1800. This is questioned on page 23.  Actually, Mary was the sister of his bride, Ann Marie.  So the story was true, just a little bit twisted over time.  This is part of the story that I helped to “untwist”, since my 4th great grandmother Catherine Plummer Jones was the sister to both Mary and Ann Marie and five other siblings- many of these Boston born siblings had ties to Hawaiian history.

I have a word file of a transcription of “The Fabulous Holts” written up by Holt descendant Sheri Iona about a dozen years ago, and I donated a printed copy to the NEHGS manuscript department.  Some of the resources listed below were also donated to NEHGS as part of a large genealogy of the Jones, Dominis and Holt families.  I don’t know if there has ever been a published version of “The Fabulous Holts”, other than the original newspaper articles.

Note:  as you are reading through these articles, please note that there are no articles 65 and 74.  The numbering system was in error as these were published in the Honolulu Star-Bulletin

Click this link for a PDF file of “The Fabulous Holts” transcribed by Lisa Ululani Holt:

Other Holt Family resources:

Recollections: Memoirs of John Dominis Holt 1919 - 1935 by John Dominis Holt, Ku Pa’a Publishing, Honolulu, Hawaii, 1993.  Also at the NEHGS library in the 7th floor stacks.

Robert William Holt: Founder of the Holt Family in Hawaii, by John Dominis Holt, Topgallant Publishing, Co, Hawaii, 1988 (my copy was purchased at the Bishop Museum in Honolulu, Hawaii) A copy is at the NEHGS library in the 7th floor stacks.

There was a Holt Genealogy manuscript written in 1974 compiled by Kaala Richardson Ridley, and expanded with notes by Sheri Iona in 2008.  It was never published in book form, but has been distributed to members of the family.   I donated a copy to NEHGS and it is available in the manuscript department.

Hawaii’s Holts Facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/253651931332203/

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The URL for this post is
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/12/the-fabulous-holts.html
Copyright © 2014, Heather Wilkinson Rojo


Thursday, December 25, 2014

Merry Christmas from Nutfield Genealogy!

My First Christmas!
Do you have a photo of your first Christmas, too?




The URL for this post is
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/12/merry-christmas-from-nutfield-genealogy.html
Copyright (c) 2014, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Wednesday, December 24, 2014

Weathervane Wednesday ~ Two Clocktowers

Weathervane Wednesday is an on-going series of photographs I post weekly.  I started by publishing weather vanes from the Londonderry area, but now I've been finding interesting weather vanes all across New England.  Sometimes my weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are interesting. Often, my readers tip me off to some very unique and unusual weather vanes, too!

Today's weather vane collection is from an island two hours by air from Boston.

Do you know the location of the weather vanes featured in collection #188? Scroll down to see the answer!





The Clocktower Mall at the Royal Dock Yards, Bermuda
seen from the street... 



and seen from the harbor

The Clocktower Mall was built in the Royal Navy Dock Yards of Bermuda as administrative offices in the 1800s.   In 1856 it was used as a warehouse for the British Royal Navy. The South Tower is a regular clock, and the North Tower is a one handed tide clock to mark high tide.  Each tower is 100 feet high.

The Royal Naval Dockyard was built in 1795.  The first construction laborers were sailors, and then slaves were used, followed by prisoners.  There are many fortifications, ramparts, warehouses, barracks and buildings including an admiral's residence.  It was a crucial naval yard for the War of 1812, World War I and World War II.  It was used as a naval shipyard until 1958.

Today the Clocktower Mall has many small shops and places to grab snacks, near the cruise ship terminal.  Nearby are larger shops, restaurants, art galleries and the "Frog and Onion" pub. Both clocks in the clocktowers are not functioning.

Shopping at the Royal Navy Dockyard webpage
http://www.dockyardtimes.com/dockyard-times-shop/166-shop-in-dockyard  

Shopping guide to the Clocktower Mall
http://www.thewestend.bm/category/shopping/clocktower-mall/  

Wikipedia article for the Royal Naval Dockyard in Bermuda
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Naval_Dockyard,_Bermuda  




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The URL for this post is
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/12/weathervane-wednesday-two-clocktowers.html

Copyright (c) 2014, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Tuesday, December 23, 2014

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Alice Scobey, died 1753, Londonderry, New Hampshire

This tombstone was photographed at the First Settlers area of the Forest Hill Cemetery in East Derry, New Hampshire.  It was cleaned at some point by the Friends of Forest Hill Cemetery, and you can see the before and after photographs posted at the memorial at the Find A Grave website by clicking here.


HERE LYES THE BODY OF
ALICE SCOBEY SHE DIED
AGUST 29 1753 AGED 29
YEARS.

The carving on this gravestone has been attributed to John Wright, the Scots Irish carver who was well known for his geometric and hieroglyphic gravestone markings in this area of New Hampshire.  You can see examples of his work, including this gravestone, at this link:  CLICK HERE.

This is a complete article on the work of John Wright (1702 - 1775) of Londonderry, New Hampshire, as a PDF file:
http://hne-rs.s3.amazonaws.com/filestore/1/2/8/4/2_42c271659b5633b/12842_baa039815612028.pdf


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The URL for this post is
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/12/tombstone-tuesday-alice-scobey-died.html
Copyright (c) 2014, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Monday, December 22, 2014

Blog Caroling “Over the River and Through the Woods”

This blog post was written for
Footnote Maven's Annual Tradition of Blog Caroling!
http://www.footnotemaven.com/2014/12/do-you-hear-what-i-hear.html

This original 1844 Poem had six stanzas and was titled “The New England Boy’s Song about Thanksgiving”.  It was published in the book Flowers for Children by Lydia Maria (Francis) Child.  The poem was later set to music by an unknown composer, and the words changed to reflect Christmas.

Over the river, and through the wood,
To Grandfather's house we go;
the horse knows the way to carry the sleigh
through the white and drifted snow.

Over the river, and through the wood,
to Grandfather's house away!
We would not stop for doll or top,
for 'tis Thanksgiving Day.

Over the river, and through the wood—
oh, how the wind does blow!
It stings the toes and bites the nose
as over the ground we go.

Over the river, and through the wood—
and straight through the barnyard gate,
We seem to go extremely slow,
it is so hard to wait!

Over the river, and through the wood—
When Grandmother sees us come,
She will say, "O, dear, the children are here,
bring a pie for everyone."

Over the river, and through the wood—
now Grandmother's cap I spy!
Hurrah for the fun! Is the pudding done?
Hurrah for the pumpkin pie!

Not only is this one of my favorite Christmas Carols, but there is a genealogical connection to my family tree.  My Dad used to sing this song for Thanksgiving, or anytime we were driving to my grandmother’s house when we were kids.  Especially in the winter when it was snowing.  Now I find myself singing this song whenever we are on any winter journey that takes us “over the river and through the woods”.  This is easy because we always seem to cross the Merrimack River at least once or twice not matter if we are traveling north, south, or east.  

Lydia Maria (Francis) Child (1802 – 1880) wrote this song in 1844 while remembering childhood visits to to her grandmother’s house.   Her two sets of grandparents were Benjamin Francis and Lydia Convers  AND Barrett Rand and Susanna Hopkins.    I’m not sure which set of grandparents she was writing about, but this home is still standing in at 114 South Street, Medford, Massachusetts.  You can read about the house and see a photo at the link listed below.   Whichever grandparents lived here, both her paternal grandmother, and her maternal grandfather were cousins to me.

Barrett Rand (1738 – 1788) is my 3rd cousin 7 generations removed.  Our common ancestors are both William Towne and Joanna Blessing of Salem, Massachusetts (my 10th great grandparents) or Robert Rand and Alice Sharp (my 9th great grandparents) of Charlestown, Massachusetts.    

Lydia Convers (1736 – 1768) is my 2nd cousin 6 generations removed.  Our common ancestors are from the CONVERS, SAWYER, CARTER and WRIGHT families of Woburn, Massachusetts.  
I have many TUFTS ancestors, and many of these TUFTS cousins married into the FRANCIS family of Medford, Massachusetts.  The house attributed to being Lydia Maria Child’s grandmother’s house is now owned by Tufts University in Medford.   It is no longer “in the woods” but in a very urban neighborhood near the Mystic River. 

Lydia Maria (Francis) Child was born 11 February 1802 in Medford, the daughter of Susannah Rand and Convers Francis.  She was educated at a female seminary and started her own private school in Watertown, Massachusetts.  She was the founder of a magazine Juvenile Miscellany, the first for children in the United States.  She was an author, abolitionist and a suffragette, but is best known as the author of the poem “Over the River and Through the Woods” that became the popular Christmas Carol.  She married David Lee Child in 1826, and later died on 20 October 1880 in Wayland, Massachusetts.    Her papers are kept at the William L. Clements Library at the University of Michigan, the American Antiquarian Society in Worcester, Massachusetts, the Boston Public Library and the Massachusetts Historical Society both in Boston, and her letters are at the Phillips Library at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts and have been published on microfiche as The Collected Letters of Lydia Maria Child.

The “Over the River and Through the Woods” house in Medford, Massachusetts http://gather.com/over-the-river-and-through-the-woods/

Wikipedia – Lydia Maria Child   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lydia_Maria_Child

American National Biography Online – Lydia Maria Francis Child http://www.anb.org/articles/15/15-00127.html


UPDATE -  Here is the link to this year's "Blog Caroling" post:
http://www.footnotemaven.com/2014/12/do-you-hear-what-i-hear.html

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The URL for this post is
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/12/blog-caroling-over-river-and-through.html
Copyright (c) 2014, Heather Wilkinson Rojo



Saturday, December 20, 2014

Surname Saturday ~ RINDGE, RING from Ipswich, Massachusetts


RINDGE/RING

Daniel Rindge arrived as an immigrant first to Roxbury, Massachusetts, and in 1639 he removed to Ipswich.  He bought the Emerson house in 1648 as his homestead.  He was a fisherman and also ran a tavern for several  years.  He was licensed to keep an “ordinary” but “not to draw beer above a penny a quart, and to provide meate [food] for men & cattell”.   In 1649 Daniel Ringe was ordered to “attend on the green (South Green) and the cow herd was obliged to keep the herd on one Sunday in four.”  [This ordinance referred to dividing up the duty of watching the cows]. 

Daniel Rindge’s will was dated 5 February and proved 25 March 1661.

The last will and testament of Daniel Rindge of Ipswich, this 5th day of february, 1661. In the name of God, amen, I Daniel Rindge, being of pfect memory and understanding do dispose of what outward estate that God hath given me, and in the manner as followeth:
In the first place I commit my soul to almighty God and my body to decent buryall:

I give unto Mary, my beloved wife, one third part of my ffarme now in the hands of Daniel Davison, during the terme of her natural life; and after her decease to be divided amongst my three sonnes,--the eldest to have a double share thereoff.

I give and bequeathe unto my three sonnes, Daniel, roger and Isaack, my ffarme above Sd, to bee divided amongst them: the eldest to have a double part; then the two youngest to be equal, and they to take possession thereof at the age of one-and-twenty: my wives third part being reserved for her, during her life; and then her third part of be divided according to ye proportion above sayd.

I give and bequeathe unto my three daughters, Mary, Susanna, and Sarah, thirty pounds to each of them, and they to have possession thereof, at the age of sixteen, or at the time of their marriage.

I leave my house and lands now in ye possession of Thomas Wayt, unto my wife, * * and I will when my youngest two daughters shall bee of age, that if they desire it, they may have the same for their portions: allowing the overplus of their portions to my other Daughter, as part of her portion; or if they so desire it not, to be left to ye executors to dispose of for ye discharge of my daughters portions.

My mind and will is that if my eldest son shall dye without children, that his portion shall be left to the two younger Brothers, the elder of them two to have a double share thereof, provided that he allow to each of his sisters five pounds: and if both the eldest dye childless, the youngest to inherit their portions, allowing to each of my Daughters ten pounds, or if the youngest leave no children, the two eldest inherit his portion, the eldest having a double share: and if the two youngest leave no children the eldest to inherit their portions, paying to each of my Daughters Ten pounds.

If my wife marryeth, my mind is, her husband shall give sufficient security for what estate he is possessed of by my wife, for the discharge of my children's portions.

The remainder of my estate I leave to my wife to dispose of at her decease equally amongst all my children.

My mind is that if my wife marryeth, my children shall have liberty if they desire it, to be disposed of to good services, if they shall think meet to whom they are * * which so confirmed, I have here unto set my hand, this third day of February, 1661.

Daniell Ringe

I constitute and appoint my loving friends, Deacon William Goodhue, and Daniel Hovey, sen'r, of Ipswich, and my wife, executors and executrix of this my Last will and Testament and Rich'd Hubbard and John Dane, sen'r, overseers. In ye presence of Robert Kinsman, jun'r, and Richard Jacob.

Proved in Court, held at Ipswich, the 25th March, 1662, by the oath of Robert Kinsman and John Dane to be the will and testament of Daniel Ringe to the best of your knowledge,--by me

Robert Lord, Clerk


My RINDGE / RING genealogy:

Generation 1:   Daniel Rindge, died 6 February 1662 in Ipswich, Massachusetts, married Mary Kinsman, daughter of Robert Kinsman.  She was born about 1631 in Ipswich. Six children.

Lineage A:

Generation 2:   Mary Rindge, born about 1648, died 16 October 1732 in Ipswich; married on 20 October 1672 in Ipswich to James Fuller, son of John Fuller and Elizabeth Emerson.  He was born about 1647 and died 21 June 1725 in Ipswich.  Nine children.

Generation 3:  Dorothy Fuller, born 18 December 1684 and died 1756 in Beverly, Massachusetts; married about 21 October 1715 in Ipswich to Josiah Stone, son of Nathaniel Stone and Mary Balch.  Six children.

Generation 4: Josiah Stone m. Martha Ashby
Generation 5: Josiah Stone m.  Susanna Hix
Generation 6: Eunice Stone m. Peter Hoogerzeil
Generation 7:  Peter Hoogerzeil m. Mary Etta Healey
Generation 8: Florence Etta Hoogerzeil m. Arthur Treadwell Hitchings
Generation 9: Gertrude Matilda Hitchings m. Stanley Elmer Allen (my grandparents)

Lineage B:

Generation 2:  Sarah Ring, born 17 August 1659 in Ipswich, died after 1714; married 16 February 1680/1 in the Chebacco Parish of Ipswich to Joseph Andrews, son of John Andrews and Jane Jordan.  He was born about 1618 in England and died 20 April 1708 in the Chebacco Parish. Five children.

Generation 3: John Andrews m. Elizabeth Wallis
Generation 4: John Andrews m. Martha Cogswell
Generation 5: James Andrews m. Lucy Presson
Generation 6: Orpha Andrews m. Joseph Allen
Generation 7: Joseph Gilman Allen m. Sarah Burnham Mears
Generation 8:  Joseph Elmer Allen m. Carrie Maude Batchelder
Generation 9: Stanley Elmer Allen m. Gertrude Matilda Hitchings (my grandparents)

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The URL for this post is
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/12/surname-saturday-rindge-ring-from.html

Copyright ©2014, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Friday, December 19, 2014

Getting Ready for the Holidays? Photo Friday



Can you guess who this little girl is? Or does the name on the stocking give it away?

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The URL for this post is
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/12/getting-ready-for-holidays-photo-friday.html
Copyright (c) 2014, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Weathervane Wednesday - On a Faraway Island!

Weathervane Wednesday is an on-going series of photographs I post weekly.  I started by publishing weather vanes from the Londonderry area, but now I've been finding interesting weather vanes all across New England.  Sometimes my weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are interesting. Often, my readers tip me off to some very unique and unusual weather vanes, too!

Today's weather vane is from an island two hours by air from Boston.

Do you know the location of weather vane #187? Scroll down to see the answer!



Gibbs Hill Lighthouse, Bermuda

The view from the lighthouse

The view from the road

This unusual weathervane is mounted on a concrete column at the base of the Gibbs Hill Lighthouse in Bermuda.  Gibbs Hill is located 245 feet above the beach, and the cast iron lighthouse is another 117 feet.  There are 185 steps to the beacon at the top of the lighthouse.

The weathervane is a giant arrow, with no cardinal points. It was originally installed on top of the lighthouse in 1846, but in 1988 it was removed to place a radar scanner up there.  The radar is used to guide ships thorough the reefs surrounding Bermuda.  This weathervane was damaged in a wind storm in February 2014, but has since been restored.

Gibbs Hill Lighthouse, Bermuda website     http://bermudalighthouse.com/

Click here to see the entire series of 187 different Weathervane Wednesday posts! 

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The URL for this post is
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/12/weathervane-wednesday-on-faraway-island.html
Copyright (c) 2014, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Agnes Fisher, died 1747, Londonderry, New Hampshire

This tombstone was photographed at the Forest Hill Cemetery in East Derry, New Hampshire.  It had been cleaned by the Friends of Forest Hill in 2009.  If you would like to see a before and after photograph, please click on this link to the entry at the Find A Grave website.


HERE LIES BURIED
THE BODY   OF
MRS AGNES THE
WIFE OF MR SAMUEL
FISHER,  WHO
DEPARTED THIS 
LIFE APRIL 17th
1747 IN THE 21st
YEAR OF HER AGE

Agnes Taylor was born 6 March 1725 in Londonderry, New Hampshire, the daughter of Janet Wilson and Matthew Taylor.   She married Deacon Samuel Fisher, who was born in Ireland on 29 July 1722 and died 10 April 1806 in Londonderry.  Samuel was married three times, and Agnes was his first wife.  He also married Agnes Wilson  and Sarah Barber (both buried at the Old Hill Cemetery in Londonderry with Samuel).  He had a total of 12 children, 76 grandchildren and 53 great grandchildren according to an obituary posted at his memorial at Find a Grave.  Click here to read his memorial and obituary. 

Agnes died 17 April 1747 in Londonderry.  She was only 21 years old, and she died in childbirth.  Her daughter Nancy Fisher was born the same day as her mother's death, and she grew up to married David Ela.  Nancy lived to be 90 years old, and died on 19 February 1837 and is buried at the Forest Hill Cemetery, too, not far from her mother's grave.

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The URL for this post is
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/12/tombstone-tuesday-agnes-fisher-died.html
Copyright (c) 2014, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Monday, December 15, 2014

Weird Search Terms for My Blog 2014


Google                                                           My Comment

Skelton family massitustice                                     Apparently spelling doesn’t count on Google?
Ferdinand & Isabella weathervane                           Now THAT would be cool!
Secret documents Alan Bartlett Shepard                     THAT would be even cooler
Mirskidok                                                                ???
Norton Howland Bearse Adams Benson Clark          Narrow your search
Lundundairy                                                             Ha!
New Hamster                                                          How about West Vir-gerbil?
kuai maryot weather station                                      I don’t know how google found me with this, but
                                                                               I did have a photo of the Kauai Marriott weather station
                                                                               Believe it or not!

Images searched online that actually landed on my blog website ….
Photos of Salem witch hangings                               Yeah, right
Photo Winthrop Fleet                                               Sure, with my iPhone…
Photo Mayflower Compact signing                           OK, I’ll use my iPhone, and get a selfie this time


Questions on Google?
Are there any photos of my father online?                [this is sad]
Whose the astronot from NH?                                 5 points off for spelling

Just Plain Odd…
Cemetery property for sale flyers
Victorian steel hats
Boston Alaska Chinese vase
Salem witch shoes                                   


Close, but no cigar… these are names of kin
                                     (no one else would know these names),
                                     if you are the cousin who googled these please identify yourself!

Jonathan Glover Lee NH 1800s put in insane asylum
Peter Hoogerzeil Beverly Mass
Abijah Franklin Hitching book author
Reverend Ingraham Ebenezer Bill



For the truly curious:

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The URL for this post is
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/12/weird-search-terms-for-my-blog-2014.html
Copyright © 2014, Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Saturday, December 13, 2014

Surname Saturday ~ WALLIS of Gloucester (Rockport), Massachusetts


WALLIS

Most people think that John Wallis of Gloucester, Massachusetts is the brother of Nathaniel Wallis of Beverly, Massachusetts.  Both men lost family members during hostilities with the Native American Indians up in Maine. Both men moved to Massachusetts, and five of John’s nine children lived in Beverly with the children of Uncle Nathaniel Wallis.  Nathaniel’s death was recorded in Beverly as being born in Cornwall.  There is no proof one way or another if the two men were brothers. 

John Wallis (about 1627 – 1690) was my 8th great grandfather. He lived in Falmouth, Maine until he became a refugee in Massachusetts during the Indian war of 1675,  and he lived in the Fifth Parish of Gloucester, also known as Sandy Bay, which is now Rockport, Massachusetts.  John Wallis was a fisherman in both Maine and Massachusetts. 

John Wallis married Mary Phippen, who had been born in Hingham, Massachusetts.  An interesting article in the NEHGS Register found that she remarried after John Wallis’s death to John Black of Beverly, Massachusetts.  In a 1771 document found in the Joshua Woodbury papers at the Maine Historical Society  was this tidbit:

“…the deposition of Jonathan Woodbury of Beverly who is now in the eighty ninth year of his age testifieth and saith that he well remembers that Josiah Wallis and James Wallis of Gloucester and Joseph Wallis and Benjamin Wallis of Beverly and Elizabeth the wife of Joseph Morgan were all the reputed children of John Wallis and that after the death of the said John his widow was married to my next neighbor John Black and their lived until her death and further says not”

Just a few years later another husband was uncovered in another NEHGS Register article (see below for the volumes and page numbers).  She married Samuel Morgan in 1692 and he died in 1698.  She married Black later.  Mary’s daughter, Elizabeth, married Joseph Morgan in 1700 in Beverly (step siblings) and Mary’s son, Joseph Wallis married Elizabeth Black on 13 January 1701/2 (step siblings again!)

Samuel Morgan (about 1650 – 1698) was previously married to Elizabeth Dixey (1641 – 1690), my 8th great aunt in another lineage.  His mother, Margaret Norman (1615 – 1693) is my 9th great grand aunt, sister to my 9th great grandmother Alice Norman, and also sister to my 9th great grandfather John Norman.  Mary’s third husband, John Black (born about 1642) is my 8th great grand uncle in another lineage, too, brother of Persis (Black) Follett, my 8th great grandmother.

Confused yet?

The Purpoodock settlement was located near what is now Cape Elizabeth, near Portland, Maine.  It was attacked in 1675 during King Phillip’s War.   His daughter, Elizabeth (Wallis) Morgan; daughter in law, Mary (Standford) Wallis, and her three children, were all killed in Purpoodock, Maine by Indians in 1703.  Purpooduck was abandoned after this attack and resettled again in 1719.   In 1724, during another attack in Fox Harbor, Maine, John Wallis lost 3 grandsons and the husband of a granddaughter.  

James Wallis (about 1668 – 1744) was born in Maine and married Martha Stanford of Maine about 1685.  He bought land in Gloucester around the time of the 1703 attack in Maine.  Later he lost three sons to the Fox Harbor attack in 1724, and his son Benjamin was captured.  In his 1731 will, James Wallis stated that if his son Benjamin returned he was to have a share equal to his brother Jonathan.  There are no further records of Benjamin.

For more information on the WALLIS family:

The John Wallis Family of Cape Ann, Massachusetts” , The New England Historic Genealogical Register, Volume 152, pages 286-310, 391- 414,  Volume 153, pages 29 – 51, 183 – 206, 293 – 318, 489 – 98.

“Mary (Phippen) (Wallis) Black”, The New England Historic Genealogical Register, Volume 153, pages 291 – 293.

“Another Husband for Mary (Phippen) (Wallis) (Morgan) Black:  Samuel 2 Morgan (Robert1)  of Beverly, Mass.”, The New England Historic Genealogical Register, Volume 160, pages 99 – 100. 

My WALLIS genealogy:

Generation 1:  John Wallis, born about 1627, possibly in Cornwall, England, died on 13 September 1690  at the Fifth Parish in Gloucester (now Rockport), Massachusetts; married about 1660 to Mary Phippen, daughter of Joseph Phippen and Dorcas Wood.  She was baptized on 5 March 1643/44 in Hingham, Massachusetts and died after 29 April 1691.  Nine children.

Generation 2: James Wallis, born about 1668 in Maine, and died before 31 March 1744 in Gloucester, Massachusetts;  married about 1685 to Martha Stanford, daughter of Robert Stanford and Mary Howland.  She was born about 1672 in Maine and died after 17 August 1731 in Gloucester.  Seven children.

Generation 3: Elizabeth Wallis, baptized on 25 February 1694 in Beverly, Massachusetts and died before 7 November 1757 in Ipswich, Massachusetts; married on 6 December 1716 in Gloucester to John Andrews, son of Joseph Andrews and Sarah Ring.  He was born on 1 June 1691 in the Chebacco Parish of Ipswich, and died in October 1762 in the Chebacco Parish.   Eight children.

Generation 4:  John Andrews m. Martha Cogswell
Generation 5:  James Andrews m. Lucy Presson
Generation 6:  Orpha Andrews m. Joseph Allen
Generation 7: Joseph Gilman Allen m. Sarah Burnham Mears
Generation 8: Joseph Elmer Allen m. Carrie Maude Batchelder
Generation 9:  Stanley Elmer Allen m. Gertrude Matilda Hitchings

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The URL for this post is
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/12/surname-saturday-wallis-of-gloucester.html

Copyright © 2014, Heather Wilkinson Rojo