Saturday, January 30, 2016

Surname Saturday ~ SWETT of Newbury, Massachusetts



SWETT / SWEET / SWETE

John Swett, my 10th great grandfather,  was one of the original 91 grantees of Newbury, Massachusetts on 18 May 1642.  He died in Newbury on 13 January 1652.

John Swett’s son, Benjamin, baptized on 12 May 1624 in Wymondham, Norfolk, England, was my 9th great grandfather.  He married Hester Weare, a daughter of Nathaniel Weare, who was also one of the original Newbury grantees.   The Weare and Swett families removed together from Newbury to Hampton around 1662.  In 1670 Benjamin Swett received a grant of 100 acres from Hampton.   He became the captain of the militia.  During King Philip’s War he was killed at Black Point (Scarborough, Maine) in an Indian raid in 1677.

Benjamin Swett’s widow administered his estate in probate records found in Essex County, Massachusetts.  His estate was valued at 558 pounds, 19 shillings.  The widow remarried to Ensign Steven Greenleaf of Newbury in 1678. 

I descend from Benjamin’s son, Captain Joseph Swett (1658 – 1721) my 8th great grandfather, who was also the head of the militia and led a company to Saco, Maine in 1703.  He was several times a representative of Hampton to the General Court.   His son, Captain Benjamin Swett (1710 – 1762), my 7th great grandfather, was also the head of the Hampton militia (three generations!).


Some SWETT resources:

“The Swett Family”, New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Volume 6 [1852], pages 49 -  61.

Swett Genealogy:  Descendants of John Swett of Newbury, Massachusetts, by Everett Schemerhorn Stackpole, 1888.

History of Newbury, Massachusetts 1635 – 1902, by John James Currier, 1902.
I found this handy website  “John Swett of Newbury: A Collection of Genealogical Research Papers”  http://swett-genealogy.com/

My SWETT genealogy:

Generation 1:  John Swett, born about 1583 in Norfolk, England, died 13 January 1652; married to Phebe Unknown.  Five children.

Generation 2:  Benjamin Swett, baptized on 12 May 1624 in Wymondham, Norfolk, England and died in an Indian raid on 29 June 1677 in Black Point (now the town of Scarborough), Maine;  married on 1 November 1647 in Hampton to Hester Weare, the daughter of Nathaniel Weare and Sarah Unknown.  She was born about 1630 in England and died 16 January 1718 in Hampton Falls.  Eleven children.

Generation 3: Joseph Swett, born 21 January 1658 in Newbury, died before January 1721 in Hampton; married on 20 November 1701 in Hampton to Sarah Andrews, daughter of Thomas Andrews and Martha Baker.  She was born about 1670 in Boxford, Massachusetts.  Six children.

Generation 4:  Benjamin Swett, born 2 May 1710 in Hampton, died 6 June 1762 in Hampton Falls; married on 20 July 1732 in Hampton to Elizabeth Norton, daughter of Bonus Norton and Mary Goodhue.  She was born 31 March 1703 in Hampton and died 25 March 1759 in Hampton Falls.  Four children.  Benjamin remarried to Mary Green.

Generation 5:  Elizabeth Swett, born 29 May 1742 in Hampton Falls, died 12 August 1769; married on 24 July 1760 in Hampton Falls to David Batchelder, son of Josiah Batchelder and Sarah Page. He was born 13 January 1736 in Hampton Falls, and died 11 March 811 to Hampton Falls.  David remarried to Mary Emery in 1771 in Newbury and had eight more children.

Generation 6:  Elisha Batchelder m. Sarah Lane
Generation 7: Jonathan Batchelder m. Nancy Thompson
Generation 8: George E. Batchelder m. Abigail M. Locke
Generation 9:  George E. Batchelder m. Carrie Maude Batchelder m. Joseph Elmer Allen
Generation 10: Stanley Elmer Allen m. Gertrude Matilda Hitchings (my grandparents)


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Published under a Creative Commons License
Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Surname Saturday ~ SWETT of Newbury, Massachusetts", Nutfield Genealogy, posted January 30, 2016, ( http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/01/surname-saturday-swett-of-newbury.html: accessed [access date]). 

Friday, January 29, 2016

February 2016 Genealogy and Local History Calendar


January 30, Saturday, 9am, NEHGS Irish Genealogy Study Group, at the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  The Irish Study group meets on the last Saturday of the month to discuss research problems and share solutions. www.americanancestors.org

February 3, Thursday, noon - 1pm, Lunch and Learn: Saints, Strangers... & Merchant Adventurers?  at the Henry Hornblower II Visitor Center, Plimoth Plantation, Plymouth, Massachusetts.  Free for members, $8 non members.  A focus on the Elizabethan venture capitalists and land speculators behind Plimoth Plantation.  Meet some of these unknown characters, beyond the usual Saints and Strangers, with Pubic Historian Hilary Goodnow.  Register at this link: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/lunch-learn-saints-strangers-merchant-adventurers-speaker-hilary-goodnow-tickets-20562533090?utm_source=Development&utm_campaign=cea1dbbd57-Member_enews_December_2014&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_485720053f-cea1dbbd57-59482249&mc_cid=cea1dbbd57&mc_eid=8cf6024ba3   

February 5, Friday, noon – 1pm, Crime and Punishment in Early Massachusetts, at the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Presented by Rose A. Doherty as part the NEHGS First Friday Series.  Registration recommended, by not required, at this link: http://shop.americanancestors.org/products/crime-and-punishment-in-early-new-england?pass-through=true&utm_source=February+&utm_campaign=February+Calendar+of+Events&utm_medium=email

February 5, Friday, 6pm – 8pm The Presidential Plate, at the Monadnock Center for History and Culture at the Peterborough Historical Society, Peterborough, New Hampshire.  Enjoy a four course meal drawn from White House meals served by John Adams, Franklin Pierce, Theodore Roosevelt and Franklin Delano Roosevelt.  During dinner there will be a liberal sprinkling of historical tidbits about these presidents and their lives in the White House.  For more information, see this webpage http://monadnockcenter.org/event/the-presidential-plate/

February 6, Saturday, 10 – 11 am, New Visitor Tour at the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  FREE, no registration required.

Feb 7 (and more), 2pm, Sundays, Sundays at the Forsyth, at the Forsyth Chapel, at the main entrance to Forest Hills Cemetery, 95 Forest Hills Avenue, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts.  Two Sundays in February, March and April.  Each presentation covers a topic that highlights the residents or grounds of Forest Hill Cemetery.  Light refreshments. $10 per person. Email marianne@foresthillscemetery.com or 617-524-0128 for more information.
Feb 7: Going to Town- by Anthony Sanmarco
Feb 21: Stories in Black and White- by Dee Morris
Mar 6: SS Pierce: A Boston Tradition- by Anthony Sanmarco
Mar 20: Women of the Theater - by Dee Morris
April 3: The History of Forest Hills Cemetery- by Anthony Sanmarco
April 17: The Other New England Patriots- by Dee Morris

February 7, Monday, 2pm, Family Stories:  How and Why to Remember and Tell Them, sponsored by the Wilmot Historical Society, at the Wilmot Community Association, 64 Village Road, Wilmot, New Hampshire.  Free to the public, presented by story teller Jo Radner.  She will share foolproof ways to mine memories and interview relatives for meaningful stories. Contact Rosanna Eubank-Dude for more information 603-526-6804.

February 9, Tuesday, 5:30 – 7:30pm, Introductory Genealogy Research Assistance, at the Worcester Public Library, Worcester, Massachusetts.  One on one assistance with a librarian.  Allow at least one week lead time for research on specific topics.  Please register online at the library website.

February 9, Tuesday, 7pm, Benedict Arnold:  Patriot and Traitor?  At the Hampstead Public Library, 9 Mary E. Clark Drive, Hampstead, New Hampshire, hosted by the Friends of the Hampstead Public Library. Free to the public.

February 10, Wednesday, 6pm, Spy Hub: Catholicism, Anti Semitism and Secret Intelligence in Wartime Boston, at the Commonwealth Salon, Boston Public Library, 700 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Boston College assistant professor Charles R. Gallagher describes a British covert operation in Boston in 1939- the subject of an upcoming book.  Free to the public.

February 16, Tuesday, , 5:30 – 7:30pm, Introductory Genealogy Research Assistance, at the Worcester Public Library, Worcester, Massachusetts.  One on one assistance with a librarian.  Allow at least one week lead time for research on specific topics.  Please register online at the library website.

February 16, Tuesday, 9am – 5pm, Scout Day at NEHGS, at the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts can early badges and explore millions of records on the shelves of the NEHGS library during winter vacation week.  Lectures in the morning and afternoon, and consultations with the experts.  Troops and individual scouts are welcome. FREE, please register at this link:  http://shop.americanancestors.org/products/scout-day-at-nehgs?pass-through=true&utm_source=February+&utm_campaign=February+Calendar+of+Events&utm_medium=email  

February 18, Thursday, 7pm, “If I am not for myself, Who will be for me?” George Washington’s Runaway Slave, at the Amherst Town Library, 14 Main Street, Amherst, New Hampshire, a living history presentation by Gwendolyn Quezaire-Presutti.  Free to the public.

February 18, Thursday, 5:30pm, Newport’s Black Giants: Race, Sport and Community, at the Newport Historical Society Resource Center, 82 Touro Street, Newport, Rhode Island, presented by sports historian Robert Cvornyek.  $5 per person, $4 with the Newport Winter Festival button, $1 for NHS members. Please RSVP 401-846-0813. 

February 20, Saturday, 10 – 11 am, New Visitor Tour at the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  FREE, no registration required.

February 20, Saturday, 10:30am, Picturing Class:  Lewis W. Hine Photographs Child Labor in New England, at the Millyard Museum, 300 Bedford Street, Manchester, New Hampshire, presented by historian and author Robert Macieski, associate professor of history at the University of New Hampshire at Manchester.  Free with regular admission.  Pre-registration required at 603-622-7531.  

February 20, Saturday, 1pm, A Storm of Witchcraft: The Salem Trials and the the American Experience, at the Centre Congregational Church, 5 Summer Street, Lynnfield, Massachusetts, sponsored by the Essex Society of Genealogists, a lecture by Emerson "Tad" Baker, Professor of History at Salem State University.  There is a brown bag luncheon before the lecture.

February 21, Sunday, 2pm, Civil War Boston, at the Wellesley Free Library, 530 Washington Street, Wellesley, Massachusetts.  Barbara Berenson discusses the history of Boston in the Civil War, with special emphasis on abolitionism.  Free to the public.  

February 23, Tuesday, 5:30 – 7:30pm, Introductory Genealogy Research Assistance, at the Worcester Public Library, Worcester, Massachusetts.  One on one assistance with a librarian.  Allow at least one week lead time for research on specific topics.  Please register online at the library website.


February 23, Tuesday, 7pm, Researching Maritime Ancestors in the National Archives, sponsored by the Central Massachusetts Genealogical Society at the American Legion Hall, 122 Elm Street, Gardner, Massachusetts, by genealogist Jake Fletcher.  Free to the public.

February 23, Tuesday, 7:30pm, Social Needlework: From Quilting Bees to Sewing and Knitting Circles, at the Masonic Temple, 19 Academy Street, Arlington, Massachusetts. Trace the colorful transition from co-operative needlework to social networking. Sponsored by the Arlington Historical Society.  Free to the public. 

 February 24, Wednesday, 6pm, Genealogy: Bringing Together Past, Present and Future, at the Montachusett Regional Vocational Tech School, 1050 Westminster Street, Fitchbury, Massachusetts, presented by genealogist Jack Fletcher. 

February 24, Wednesday, 6pm, History of the Hub: Resources for Local and Family History at the Boston City Archives, at the Commonwealth Salon, Boston Public Library, 700 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Presented by Martha Crilly, archivist for Reference and Outreach at the Boston City Archives.  Free to the public.

February 24, Wednesday, 7:30pm, Voices Beyond Bondage: An Anthology of Verse by African Americans of the 19th Century, at the Royall House & Slave Quarters, 15 George Street, Medford, Massachusetts.  A book talk by Erika DeSimone and Fidel Louise.  Free to the public.

February 25, Thursday, 7:30pm,  Case Closed on the 1873 Smuttynose Ax Murders, at the Bwerwick Academy, Jeppsesen Science Center, in Berwick, Maine, sponsored by the Old Berwick Historical Society, presented by historian J. Dennis Robinson, based on research for his popular book Mystery on the Isles of Shoals.  For more information info@oldberwick.org 

February 25 – 27, Winter Weekend Research Getaway at the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Register at this link: http://shop.americanancestors.org/collections/research-tours-programs/products/winter-weekend-research-getaway?pass-through=true  Escape to NEHGS for three days of research, consultations, lectures and social events.

February 27, Saturday, 2pm, American Sweepstakes:  How One Small State Bucked the Church, The Feds and the Mob to Usher in the Lottery Age, at the NH Historical Society, 30 Park Street, Concord, New Hampshire.  Presented by author and TV journalist Kevin Flynn as he talks about his new book.  Free to the public.

February 27, Saturday, 7pm, Tavern Night at the Munroe Tavern, at 1332 Massachusetts Avenue, Lexington, Massachusetts.   Enjoy the Munroe Tavern while you taste a variety of Scotch whiskeys, eat Scottish dishes, and listen to Scottish music, songs and poetry.  Guests are encouraged to wear plaid. Men in kilts especially welcome! $50 members, $60 non-members.  Purchase tickets in advance at 781-862-1703.  

February 28, Sunday, 2pm, Winter Lecture Series: Commemoration of the 312th Anniversary of the 174 Raid- Raiding and Captive Taking along the New England and New York Borders 1688 - 1748, at Historic Deerfiled, in the Deerfield Community Center, Deerfield, Massachusetts.  Free to the public.  http://www.historic-deerfield.org/event/lectures/winter-lecture-series-harms-wayconflict-and-captivity-french-and-indian-war/?eID=18381

March, 2016,  Beginning the Journey of Genealogy, a four week genealogy course at the the Montachusett Regional Vocational Tech School, 1050 Westminster Street, Fitchburg, Massachusetts by genealogist Jake Fletcher.  See this link for more information: https://www.montytechnites.com/

March 1, Tuesday, 7pm, I Can’t Die But Once – Harriet Tubman’s Civil War, at the North Hampton Public Library, 237A Atlantic Avenue, North Hampton, New Hampshire, presented by living historian Gwendolyn Quezaire-Presutti.  Free to the public.

March 1, Tuesday, 7pm,  New Hampshire’s One-Room Rural Schools:  The Romance and the Reality, at the Exeter Historical Society, 47 Front Street, Exeter, New Hampshire.  A presentation by Steve Taylor on the lasting legacies of the one-room school and how they echo today.  Free to the public.

March 1, Tuesday, 5:30 – 7:30pm, Introductory Genealogy Research Assistance, at the Worcester Public Library, Worcester, Massachusetts.  One on one assistance with a librarian.  Allow at least one week lead time for research on specific topics.  Please register online at the library website.


March 5, Saturday (Rain Date, March 6), 10am - 4pm, Museum Clean Up Day at Plimoth Plantation, meet up at the Henry Hornblower II Visitor Center, Plimoth Plantation, Plymouth, Massachusetts.  Go behinds the scenes with a rake, a brush, a broom, or a needle and help the staff and volunteers get the museum exhibits ready for a new season! Free lunch for all participants.  Register by Tuesday, March 1st:  http://www.plimoth.org/springclean?utm_source=Development&utm_campaign=cea1dbbd57-Member_enews_December_2014&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_485720053f-cea1dbbd57-59482249&mc_cid=cea1dbbd57&mc_eid=8cf6024ba3   

March 6, Sunday, 9am – 4pm, Irish Family History Day, at the Courtyard Marriott, 275 Tremont Street, Boston, Massachusetts, sponsored by the New England Historic Genealogical Society, cost $85.  Register for a 20 minute one-on-one consultation session with an expert for an additional $30.  Questions?  Call 617-226-1226 or email education@nehgs.org.  Register online at http://shop.americanancestors.org/products/irish-family-history-day-1?pass-through=true&utm_source=Irish+Family+History+Day+-+Contributing+Members&utm_campaign=Irish+Family+History+Day+FY16&utm_medium=email

Planning Ahead:

March 11, Friday, 5:30 – 9:30, The Annual Genealogy Lock In, at the Memorial Hall Public Library, Andover, Massachusetts. Register for an evening of after hours genealogy research with exclusive access to databases, computers, microfilm and the Andover Room.  A light dinner will be served. $10 fee. Space is limited. http://www.mhl.org/genealogy-program/2015/annual-genealogy-lock


March 12, 19, and 26 (Three consecutive Saturdays), 2p m to 4pm , Workshop:  Getting Started in Genealogy with the New England Historic Genealogical Society, held at the New Hampshire Historical Society Library, 30 Park Street, Concord, New Hampshire. This class will introduce basic concepts in genealogy, tools for organizing your research, standard records and hints for conducting research.  For more information and pricing for members and non-members, visit nhhistory.org or call Wendy Olcott at 603-856-0621 to register by phone using a credit card.

March 26, Saturday, History Camp Boston 2016, at the Harriet Tubman House, 566 Columbus Avenue,  Boston, Massachusetts (Near the Mass. Ave T stop).  See this link for more information registration and schedule:  http://historycamp.org/boston-2016/

 April 16 and 17, Massachusetts Genealogical Council 2016 Seminar, at the Courtyard Hotel, Marlborough, Massachusetts.  Register online, see the website http://massgencouncil.org/index.php/2016seminar/register

April 30, The 2016 New England Family History Conference. For details see the website http://nefamilyhistory.com/

June 25, Saturday, 1pm to 4pm,  French Canadians in the Granite State, at the New Hampshire Historical Society, 30 Park Street, Concord, New Hampshire.  This is a workshop on advanced genealogy for those with specific interest in New Hampshire’s largest ethnic group, the French Canadians.  It will be led by the experts at the New England Historic Genealogical Society. For more information and pricing for members and non-members, visit nhhistory.org or call Wendy Olcott at 603-856-0621 to register by phone using a credit card.

September 15 – 17, New York State Family History Conference, at the Holiday Inn Syracuse, 441 Electronics Parkway, Liverpool, New York.

April 2017, NERGC 2017, at the Mass Mutual Center, 1277 Main Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Thursday, January 28, 2016

To all Nutfield Genealogy Blog Followers


To my dear blog readers and blog followers,

Each and every one of you is important to me.  I enjoy your email and comments very much, and many of you have become Facebook friends with me, or have joined my Facebook group “Nutfield Genealogy” https://www.facebook.com/nutfield.gen/?fref=ts   I appreciate all your comments, suggestions, humor and inquires.

I operate my blog on a blogging platform supported by Google.   Recently Google announced that they will be changing the way Google Friend Connect works for blog followers.  If you signed in to be a blog follower using anything other than a Google account, your name was removed from the follower list. This affects anyone who signed in using a Twitter, Yahoo, Orkut or OpenID account.  You can read the press release from Google at this link:  http://buzz.blogger.com/2015/12/an-update-on-google-friend-connect.html

If you were removed from the follower list, you will no longer receive notifications of new posts. You will need to sign up for a Google account and re-follow the blog.  Or you can look in the right hand column of my blog for the “Follow by email” link.  Just enter your email and you will receive an email notice every time I publish a new blog post.

This morning I noticed that I formerly had over 350 followers, but now I have only 278 followers listed for my blog.  I'm very sorry that some of you were cut from notifications.  It is beyond my control, and I hope you will sign up by email to re-follow. 

 If anyone has questions, concerns, or comments, please comment below or email me at vrojomit@gmail.com

Thank you for reading my blog!

Heather Wilkinson Rojo




Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Weathervane Wednesday ~ Three Horses from one Town

Weathervane Wednesday is an on-going series of photographs I post weekly.  I started out by publishing only weather vanes from the Londonderry area, but now I've been finding interesting weather vanes from all over New England.  Sometimes my weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are very interesting.  Often, my readers tip me off to some very unique and unusual weather vanes.

Today's weather vanes are all from one town in New Hampshire .

Do you know the location of the weather vanes in post #245?  Scroll down to see the answer...

Horse #1


All three of these horse weathervanes are from Merrimack, New Hampshire.

This running horse was seen above Merrimack Vision Care on Daniel Webster Highway.  It's a nice big weather vane, visible from far away with no obstructions. This two dimensional weathervane has a beautiful green patina.  There are parking lots on three sides of this building, so you can pull over to admire this weather vane no matter which way the wind is blowing! 

Horse #2


This little weathervane is a two dimensional horse with a sulky.  It looks like a country doctor in his little two wheeled buggy.  It is extremely small, and mounted on a bird feeder in the side yard of a home on Bedford Road near Daniel Webster Highway.  
This weather vane is fun, but very hard to find! 

Horse #3



This weather vane was also found on Bedford Road in Merrimack.  It is a small sized two dimensional running horse mounted on a cupola above a garage at a private residence.  This one is small, but easy to see against the sky, and the yard is free from trees. The traffic really whizzes by at this location, so you have to look fast!  There is no place to pull over and admire this weathervane. 

All these weathervanes were photographed one afternoon last fall when I metup with Merrimack genealogy blogger June Stearns Butka of the "Dame Gussie's Genealogy Rants" blog.   She had told me that there were some great weather vanes in Merrimack, so I picked her up and we drove around town and found SIX weathervanes.  I've already posted three on previous Wednesdays.

Thanks, June!

Click here to see the entire series of Weathervane Wednesday posts!

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Published under a Creative Commons License
Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~ Three Horses from one Town", Nutfield Genealogy, posted January 27, 2016 ( http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/01/weathervane-wednesday-three-horses-from.html : accessed [access date]).

Tuesday, January 26, 2016

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Little 11 Year Old Benjamin Balch, died 1736 in Beverly, Massachusetts

This tombstone was photographed at the Abbott Hale Cemetery in Beverly, Massachusetts


HERE LYES BURIED
the BODY OF
BENIAMIN BALCH
ONLY SON OF
DEAC. BENI. BALCH
& MARCY HIS WIFE
WHO DEPARTED 
THIS LIFE AUG. 4th
1736 IN Ye 11th YEAR
OF HIS AGE.

This little boy, Benjamin Balch, was the youngest child and only son of the six children born to Benjamin Balch and his wife Mercy Leach.  Of their six children, only three daughters- Mercy, Martha and Deborah, lived to marry and have their own children.  Little Benjamin was born 22 September 1725 in Beverly, and died 4 August 1736 in Beverly.  His father, Benjamin Balch, was the son of Samuel Balch (1651 - 1723), my 7th great grand uncle, and his wife Martha Newmarch (1653 - 1720).   I descend from Samuel's sister, Mary (1667 - 1737) who married Nathaniel Stone. 

See the Descendants of John Balch, by Robin Balch Hodgkins, Beverly Historical Society, 2014, page 14 for more about Benjamin Balch and Mercy Leach.   I am a descendant of both the BALCH and the LEACH families.

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Published under a Creative Commons License
Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday ~ Tombstone Tuesday ~ Little 11 Year Old Benjamin Balch, died 1736 in Beverly, Massachusetts", Nutfield Genealogy, posted January 26, 2016 (  http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/01/this-tombstone-was-photographed-at.html: accessed [access date]).

Saturday, January 23, 2016

Surname Saturday ~ MARRIAN of Watertown, Massachusetts and Hampton, New Hampshire


MARRIAN/MARION/MARIAN

John Marrian settled in Hampton, New Hampshire where was listed as a proprietor and bought his first piece of land in 1645.  In 1646 he was granted two more acres by the town.  By 1671 he deeded land to the husbands of his daughters Elizabeth and Hannah, and in 1681 he deeded more land to his sons-in-law in exchange for their providing for himself and his second wife for the rest of their lives. 

It is thought that John Marrian was an early settler in Watertown.  Torrey’s New England Marriages have a marriage for John Marian and his wife Sarah pulled from the Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire, page 458.  This states that Sarah’s name was Sarah EDDY (unconfirmed).  He remarried to Margery, the widow of William Godfrey.  John Marrian’s daughter Hannah married his stepson, Isaac Godfrey.  I descend from his other daughter, Elizabeth, who married Henry Dearborn in 1666. 

There was an early shoemaker in Boston named John Marrian, but it is unknown if there was a kinship between the two men. 

More MARRIAN resources:

John Marrian is not mentioned in Hollick’s New Englanders in the 1600s, nor in Anderson’s Great  Migration series or directory.   Your best resources would be the Watertown and Hampton vital records and town histories, and the Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire by Noyes, Libby and Davis. I couldn’t find a recent article (nor an old one) on the MARRIAN family in the NEHGS database. 

My MARRIAN lineage:

Generation 1:  John Marrian, died about 1681 in Hampton, New Hampshire; married in Watertown to Sarah Unknown who died 26 January 1670/1 in Hampton (five children); married on 14 September 1671 in Hampton to Margery Unknown, widow of Deacon William Godfrey (no children).

Generation 2:  Elizabeth Marrian, probably born in Watertown, died 6 July 1716 in Hampton; married on 10 January 1666 to Henry Dearborn, son of Godfrey Dearborn.  He was baptized on 22 March 1633/4 and died 18 January 1725 in Hampton.  Seven children, and I descend from two of them.

Lineage A:

Generation 3:  Sarah Dearborn m. Philemon Blake
Generation 4: Elizabeth Blake m. Samuel Lane
Generation 5: Samuel Lane m. Hepzibah Sleeper
Generation 6: Sarah Lane m. Elisha Batchelder
Generation 7: Jonathan Batchelder m. Nancy Thompson
Generation 8: George E. Batchelder m.  Abigail M. Locke
Generation 9: George E. Batchelder m. Mary Katharine Emerson
Generation 10: Carrie Maude Batchelder m. Joseph Elmer Allen
Generation 11: Stanley Elmer Allen m. Gertrude Matilda Hitchings (my grandparents)

Lineage B1:

Generation 3:  John Dearborn m. Abigail Batchelder
Generation 4:  Elizabeth Dearborn m. John Garland
Generation 5: Elizabeth Garland m. Richard Locke
Generation 6:  Simon Locke m. Abigail Mace
Generation 7: Richard Locke m. Margaret Welch
Generation 8: Abigail M. Locke m. George E. Batchelder (see above)

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Published under a Creative Commons License
Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Surname Saturday ~ MARRIAN of Watertown, Massachusetts and Hampton, New Hampshire", Nutfield Genealogy, posted January 23, 2016, ( http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/01/surname-saturday-marrian-of-watertown.html: accessed [access date])/ 

Friday, January 22, 2016

Walkway of the Presidents, San Juan, Puerto Rico ~ Photo Friday

How many US presidents have visited the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico?  Did you know that of the 44 total US presidents, only 9 have ever visited Puerto Rico?  Even if you count only the presidents since Teddy Roosevelt (from 1906 to today), of those 18 presidents only 9 have visited Puerto Rico.  Between Ford's unofficial visit in 1976 and Obama's visit in 2011, 35 years passed without a presidential visit - even though the age of jet travel would make it much easier than Teddy's visit via ship on the way from the Panama Canal in 1906.

In the city of San Juan, just across the street from the capitol building, statues of the presidents who have visited the island were erected in 2010.  An additional statue of President Obama was added after his official visit to Puerto Rico in 2011.  You can see these statues below...

Theodore Roosevelt



Herbert Hoover

Franklin Delano Roosevelt

Harry S. Truman


THE PEOPLE OF PUERTO RICO HONORS
THOSE THAT WHILE HOLDING
THE OFFICE OF
PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATE
WERE SO MOVED AS TO VISIT THE ISLAND AND ITS PEOPLE
WHILE RECOGNIZING THAT THOSE THAT HOLD THIS OFFICE LEAVE
THEIR IMPACT UPON THE LIVES AND AFFAIRS OF OUR NATION AND OUR WORLD.
THE VALUES THAT REPRESENT THEM WERE DELIBERATELY COMMISSIONED
AND MADE TO REPRESENT THE FIGURE OF EACH PRESIDENT AS A CITIZEN CALLED UPON
BY THE NATION TO SERVE AN INDIVIDUAL, AS PERSONS, WHOSE HUMAN SIDE SEEMS TO
BECKON US TO COME CLOSER WHERE BEFORE WE SEE ONLY THEIR FIGURES WITHOUT PEDESTALS
NOT ORNAMENTS AS THEY SEEM TO WALK UP TO MEET US, THE PEOPLE OF PUERTO RICO
AT THE HOUSE OF LAWS.

THIS
WALKWAY OF THE PRESIDENTS
HAS BEEN CONCEIVED TO HONOR THOSE THAT ENJOYED OUR HOSPITALITY
IN THE PAST, AS WELL AS THOSE THAT MAY DO SO IN THE FUTURE
SIXTEENTH LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF PUERTO RICO
FEBRUARY 15, 2010

HONORABLE THOMAS RIVERA SCHATZ  HONORABLE JENNIFER A. GONZALEZ COLON
PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE OF PUERTO RICO      SPEAKER OF THE REPRESENTATIVES


Dwight D. Eisenhower

John F. Kennedy

Lyndon B. Johnson

Gerald R. Ford

Barack Obama

For more about the official visits of US Presidents to Puerto Rico, see this article at Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_presidential_visits_to_Puerto_Rico


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Published under a Creative Commons License
Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Walkway of the Presidents, San Juan, Puerto Rico ~ Photo Friday", Nutfield Genealogy, posted January 22, 2016, (  http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/01/walkway-of-presidents-san-juan-puerto.html:  accessed [access date]). 

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Weathervane Wednesday ~ At a historic farm

Weathervane Wednesday is an on-going series of photographs I post weekly.  I started out by publishing only weather vanes from the Londonderry area, but now I've been finding interesting weather vanes from all over New England.  Sometimes my weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are very interesting.  Often, my readers tip me off to some very unique and unusual weather vanes.

Today's weather vane is from somewhere in New Hampshire.

Do you know the location of weather vane #244?  Scroll down to see the answer...




This running horse weathervane was photographed at the Swenson Farm on Wallace Road in Merrimack, New Hampshire.  It is an antique two dimensional weather vane with a nice patina.  The cardinal points are particularly elegant, with the fancy curlicue supports.  The running horse weathervane is by far the most popular weather vane for barns in New Hampshire.

The Swenson farm is a landmark in the town of Merrimack.  It has been operated by the Swenson family since 1959, and has a popular farm stand.  The barn and farmhouse appear to be much, much older.  Karen Swenson is the assistant gardener who participates in the Merrimack community garden in Wasserman Park on Naticook Road.

Thanks to genealogy blogger June Stearns Butka, for taking me out to find this weathervane.  She was tipped off to this great weathervane by a resident of this farm and we had permission to photograph this.  I'm glad we had permission because the barn sits on a private, dirt road, and I never would have found it without her assistance!

Click here to see the entire series of Weathervane Wednesday posts!

---------------------------------
Published under a Creative Commons License
Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~ At a historic farm", Nutfield Genealogy, posted January 20, 2016 ( http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/01/weathervane-wednesday-at-historic-farm.html : accessed [access date]).

Tuesday, January 19, 2016

Tombstone Tuesday ~ My 8th Great Grand Aunt, Mary (Norton) West, buried 1762 Beverly, Massachusetts

This tombstone was photographed at the Abbott Hale Burying Ground, Beverly, Massachusetts


Here lies ye body of
Mrs. MARY WEST
wife of Mr. SAMUEL
WEST who died April ye
28th AD 1762
In the 80th year
of her age.


Mary Norton was the daughter of George Norton and Mary Foxwell of York, Maine.  She was born on 18 January 1685 and died 28 April 1762 (she was only 77, not 80 years old, but our colonial ancestors tended to round up not being as vain about age as modern Americans).  On January 1701/2 she married Samuel West in Beverly, Massachusetts.  He was the son of Thomas West and Elizabeth Jackson.  Samuel West was born on 22 May 1674 in Beverly, and died 18 April 1725 in Beverly.  He was the brother to my 8th great grandmother, Mary West (1676 - 1758) who married Robert Woodbury.

Mary Norton is my 4th cousin 10 generations removed via my NORTON lineage, as a descendant of Bonus Norton (1657 - 1719) of Ipswich, Massachusetts and Hampton, New Hampshire.

Mary Norton and Samuel West had nine children, all born in Beverly, Massachusetts.

------------------------------

Published under a Creative Commons License
Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday ~ My 8th Great Grand Aunt, Mary (Norton) West, buried 1762 Beverly, Massachusetts", Nutfield Genealogy, posted January 19, 2016, (  http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/01/tombstone-tuesday-my-8th-great-grand.html:  accessed [access date]). 

Saturday, January 16, 2016

Surname Saturday ~ DEARBORN of Exeter and Hampton, New Hampshire

The DEARBORN memorial stone at
Founder's Park in Hampton, New Hampshire

DEARBORN

Godfrey Dearborn, a weaver from Hannah, Lincolnshire, signed Reverend Wheelwright’s Combination at Exeter, New Hampshire in 1639.  Around 1648 he removed from Exeter to Hampton and settled in the West End. His house was built on 73 Exeter Road in North Hampton.   His wife, “Goody Dearbarn”, was a member of the Hampton meetinghouse in 1650 and given a pew.  He had six children, mentioning “three daughters” in his will, and his sons Thomas, Henry and John by name.

The will of Godfrey Dearborn of Hampton, 1680

I Godfreey Dearbarne of Hampton in the provenc of New Hampshier in New England Being aged and Inferme of Body * * *
I give and Bequeath Unto Dorothy Dearbarn my loveing wife for the term of her life my Dwellinng House & Barne & orchyard and the Use and Improvementt of all my land both Areable land pastuer & marsh land for her Comfortable subsistenc Duering the terme of Her life, and the use and Improvementt of all my moveables within Dores and withoutt Duering the terme of her life
Itt I doe Give and bequeath Unto my Grand Child Ann Shatredg that now liveth with mee one two year old Heffer which she is to Receive att the End of Her time yt she is to live with mee
Itt I Doe Give Unto my sone Thomas Deararne my Dark Browne horse which I Use to Rid on
Itt I Doe Give Unto my son Thomas and Henry Dearbarn all the Rest of my Cattle thatt shall Remaine att the Decease of the longest liver of mee or my wife Excepting Sheep and swine which are other wayes Disposed of
Itt my will and pleasure is thatt all the Sheepe and swine that shall Remaine att my wives Decease shall be Equally Divided betwixt all my Grand Children yt shall be then living: and the Division to be made by my Executors & over seers
Itt I Doe Give and Bequeath Unto my Son John Dearbarn my House barne and house lott and all my land both Areable land pastuers medows & marshes and all Towne Rights and priveledges thereunto belonging and all my tooles and Carts & other Implements of Husbandry: and I Doe appointt my son John Dearbarne to bee my Exectuer to this my will and the Estate the which he is to Enter Upon and possesse att my wives Decease and to bee and Remaine to him and his Heires for Ever
Itt I Doe ordaine and Appointt my two Eldest sons Thomas Dearbarne and henry Dearbarne to bee my over seers to this my last will and testamentt whom I appointt to see to the managmentt of my Estate thatt my wife may have a Comfortable living outt of itt Duering the terme of her life
And for whatt Houshold stuff I shall leave thatt my wife shall have the use and Improvement thereof Duering the terme of her life, and then to bee Equally Devided Between my three Daughters only leaving itt to my wives liberty to Dispose of whatt was her owne before I maried Her viz one fether Bed & boulster & Rug & Coverlett and her Greatt Bible & her Red flannell petticoate to ye wife of John morse
And this my last will and testamentt I Conferme with my Hand & Seale Affixed therto this fourteenth Day of December in the year of our lord one thousand Six hundred & Eighty
His
Godfrey Dearbarn X [seale]
Mark & Seale
Signed Sealed & Declared
to bee ye last will of Godfrey
Dearbarn in pr of
Samuell Dalton senr Mehetable Dalton
This was sworn to ye 26 of agust: 86 by mehetable Dalton alice [alias] Simins befor mee
Henry green Justis Peace

Godfrey Dearborn had several famous descendants including General Henry Dearborn (1751 – 1829) of the Revolutionary War who also served as Secretary of War under President Thomas Jefferson.    The city of Dearborn, Michigan was named for General Dearborn, as well as Fort Dearborn (1803) in Chicago. During World War II another Fort Dearborn was established in what is now Odiorne Point State Park in New Hampshire.   

General Dearborn had a son, Henry Alexander Scammell Dearborn (1783 – 1851) who was an Adjutant General of Massachusetts and a Massachusetts statesman.  He wrote many books on botany and was the first president of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society.

Some DEARBORN genealogy resources:

Provincial Papers, Documents and Records Relating to the Province of New Hampshire from 1686 to 1722, edited by Nathaniel Boulton,  Volume 1, page 133

The New England Historic Genealogical Register, “Lincolnshire Origin of Exeter Settlers”, Volume 68, pages 68 – 72

History of the Town of Hampton, New Hamphire: From Its Settlement in 1638, to the Autumn of 1892, by Joseph Dow, 1893, pages 659 – 672

The Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire, by Sybil Noyes, Charles Thornton Libby and Walter Goodwin Davis, reprint 1972, pages 189 – 190.

An old book with some mistakes:
The Dearborns of Hampton, New Hampshire: Descendants of Godffrey Dearborn of Exeter and Hampton, by Joseph Dow, 1893  [available to view online at Archive.org, Ancestry.com  and the Hathi Trust website]

There is also a manuscript at the NEHGS library for a Dearborn family genealogy by Edmund Batchelder Dearborn on microfilm and in the manuscript department.  See CS71 .D285 for the microfilm and Mss C 2993 for the manuscript.  

NEHGS also has a compiled genealogy of the Dearborn family by Henry Alexander Scammell Deaborn (see above) Mss C 4653  as well as his personal papers and letters Mss 859

--------------------

My DEARBORN Genealogy:

Generation 1:  Godfrey Dearborn,  son of William Dearborn of Willoughby, Lincolnshire and his wife, Agnes Hay, was baptized  on 24 September 1603 in Willoughby and died 4 February 1686 in Hampton, New Hampshire; married first before 1632 to Unknown;  married second 25 November 1662 in Hampton to Dorothy Unknown, widow of Philemon Dalton.  Six children, and I descend from two.

Lineage A:

Generation 2:  Henry Dearborn, baptized on 22 March 1634, died 18 January 1725 in Hampton;  married on 10 January 1666 in Hampton to Elizabeth Marrian, daughter of John Marrian and Sarah Unknown.  She died 6 July 1716 in Hampton.  Seven children, and I descend from two.

Lineage A1:

Generation 3: Sarah Dearborn, born 9 November 1675 in Hampton, died after 1741; married on 20 January 1697/98 in Hampton to Philemon Blake, son of Jasper Blake and Deborah Everard.  He was born 23 May 1671 in Hampton, and died after 1741.  Eight children.

Generation 4: Elizabeth Blake m. Samuel Lane
Generation 5: Samuel Lane m. Hepzibah Sleeper
Generation 6: Sarah Lane m. Elisha Batchelder
Generation 7: Jonathan Batchelder m. Nancy Thompson
Generation 8: George E. Batchelder m.  Abigail M. Locke
Generation 9: George E. Batchelder m. Mary Katharine Emerson
Generation 10: Carrie Maude Batchelder m. Joseph Elmer Allen
Generation 11: Stanley Elmer Allen m. Gertrude Matilda Hitchings (my grandparents)

Lineage A2:

Generation 3: John Dearborn, born 10 October 1666 in Hampton, died 22 November 1750 in Hampton;  married on 4 November 1689 in Hampton to Abigail Batchelder, daughter of Nathaniel Batchelder and Deborah Smith.  She was born 28 December 1667 in Hampton and died 14 November 1736 in North Hampton.  Eight children.

Generation 4:  Elizabeth Dearborn, born 31 August 1692 in Hampton, died 10 March 1770 in Rye, New Hampshire; married on 12 January 1716 in Hampton to  John Garland, son of Peter Garland and Sarah Taylor.  He was born 13 April 1692 in Hampton and died about 1741.  Two children.

Generation 5: Elizabeth Garland m. Richard Locke
Generation 6:  Simon Locke m. Abigail Mace
Generation 7: Richard Locke m. Margaret Welch
Generation 8: Abigail M. Locke m. George E. Batchelder (see above)

Lineage B:

Generation 2: Sarah Dearborn, born about 1641, died 21 August 1714; married about 1660 in Hampton to Thomas Nudd, son of Roger Nudd and Joan Unknown.  He was born 6 January 1629 in Omesby, Norfolk, England and died 31 January 1713 in Hampton.  Seven children.

Generation 3: Hannah Nudd m. Francis Page
Generation 4: Sarah Page m. Josiah Batchelder
Generation 5: David Batchelder m. Elizabeth Swett
Generation 6: Elisha Batchelder m. Sarah Lane  (see above)


-----------------------------------------

Published under a Creative Commons License
Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Surname Saturday ~ DEARBORN of Exeter and Hampton, New Hampshire", Nutfield Genealogy, posted January 16, 2016,  (  http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/01/surname-saturday-dearborn-of-exeter-and.html: accessed [access date]). 

Thursday, January 14, 2016

Robert A. Allen, died 9 January 2016

My first cousin, Robert Arthur Allen, Jr.



Craig Allen, Bob Allen, Jr.
Bob Allen, Sr.
and grandson


from the website www.legacy.com published on the Union Leader website 13 January 2016 http://www.unionleader.com/

RAYMOND - Robert A. "Bob" Allen Jr., 57, of Raymond died unexpectedly Saturday Jan. 9, 2016, after being stricken ill. He was born in Ipswich, Mass., on Dec. 25, 1958, the son of Robert A. Allen Sr. and Joyce (Wood) Allen, and lived in Raymond for the past 11 years.Bob was a U.S. Army veteran and was currently employed as a manager for the Essex Management Group in Haverhill, Mass., where he worked for the past 25 years. He also served the town of Raymond as a firefighter since 2004. He is survived by two sons, Christopher Short and his wife, Michelle, of Sandown, Craig Allen and his wife, Alessa, of Nottingham; one daughter, Courtney Allen, and her fiance, James Goudreault, of Haverhill, Mass.; his father, Robert A. Allen Sr., and his wife, Diane, of Rochester; his mother, Joyce (Wood) Allen of Haverhill, Mass., the mother of his children, Janet Allen of Haverhill, Mass.; two brothers, Chris Allen and Corey Marshall; four sisters, Bonnie Allen Madigan of Bradford, Mass., Theresa Trumbull of Nottingham, Rebecca Allen of Plaistow, Kimberly Reid of Portsmouth; five grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by a brother, John Allen, and two sisters, Catherine Trumbull and Patricia Allen Rivers..

SERVICES: His funeral will be held on Friday at 10 a.m. in the Berube Comeau Funeral Home, 47 Broadway, Haverhill, Mass. Burial will be private.Visiting hours at the funeral home will be held on Thursday evening from 5 to 8 p.m.

Berube-Comeau Funeral Home
47 Broadway
HaverhillMA 01832
978-373-5668

Wednesday, January 13, 2016

Weathervane Wednesday ~ A Cat on the Roof!

Weathervane Wednesday is an on-going series of photographs I post weekly.  I started out by publishing only weather vanes from the Londonderry area, but now I've been finding interesting weather vanes from all over New England.  Sometimes my weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are very interesting.  Often, my readers tip me off to some very unique and unusual weather vanes.

Today's weather vane is from somewhere in New Hampshire.

Do you know the location of weather vane #243?  Scroll down to see the answer...





The fun twist for this weathervane is that it was reported to me by genealogy blogger June Butka Stearns of the blog "Dame Gussie's Genealogical Rants".  I picked up June one afternoon and we rode around Merrimack, New Hampshire and she pointed out SIX new weather vanes for me to photograph!

This little cat weathervane was spotted above a private residence on Wire Road in Merrimack.  It's very small and June wouldn't have noticed it at all if she hadn't been looking for another weather vane that had been reported to her off Wire Road.  It was also very difficult to photograph from the road, but here are the results!

This weathervane is a two dimensional cat.  Cat weathervanes are extremely rare.  I see many more weather vanes for dogs, and even so dogs are much rarer than horses, roosters and eagles.

Click here to see the entire series of Weathervane Wednesday posts!


-------------------------------
Published under a Creative Commons License
Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~ A Cat on the Roof!", Nutfield Genealogy, posted January 13, 2016 ( http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/01/weathervane-wednesday-cat-on-roof.html : accessed [access date]).

Tuesday, January 12, 2016

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Elizabeth (Goldsmith) (Quarles) Haskell, died 1765 Beverly, Massachusetts

This tombstone was photographed at the Abbott Hale Burying Ground in Beverly, Massachusetts



Here lies buried ye Body of
Mrs. ELIZABETH HASKELL
The wife of
Capt. ROBERT HASKELL
who died January ye 8th
1765.  Aged 77 Years


Elizabeth Goldsmith was born about 1688, the daughter of Zacheus Goldsmith and Mary Hutton of Wenham, Massachusetts.  She married first to Francis Quarles on 23 June 1715 in Beverly.  She married second to Robert Haskell in April 1735 in Ipswich ( marriage intentions filed in Beverly on 14 March 1724/5).  

Robert Haskell was born 17 February 1694 in Beverly, the son of William Haskell and Ruth West.  Ruth is my 8th great aunt, and I descend from her sister, Mary West (1676 - 1758) who married Robert Woodbury.   Robert Haskell was a Captain in the local militia, not a sea captain.  

---------------------------

Published under a Creative Commons License
Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday ~ Elizabeth (Goldsmith) (Quarles) Haskell, died 1765 Beverly, Massachusetts", Nutfield Genealogy, posted January 12, 2016 (  http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/01/tombstone-tuesday-elizabeth-goldsmith.html: accessed [access date]).

Sunday, January 10, 2016

Top Ten Blog Posts for 2015


Every month on the 10th I post some sort of “Top Ten” list.  It’s very funny that two of these Top Ten posts made the Top Ten list for 2015!  Of the top ten posts, only three were written in 2015, which I find very interesting, too.  

My blog is not monetized.  I don’t promote advertising, and I have no affiliate links. So checking out my stats is only an activity I do out of pure curiosity and fun.  If there are patterns, I just ignore them because I write for fun, for my family, and for the pure enjoyment of receiving comments and feedback from readers.

Here are the top ten blog posts from Nutfield Genealogy -  in reverse order…

#10. "Plan ahead for genealogy research without Family Tree Maker – Part 1 of an ongoing series"
                The retirement of Family Tree Maker software was big news late in 2015, and this post barely made it to the top 10 list.  It barely made a little over 1,000 hits this past month according to my statistics.  Not bad for a post from just a few weeks ago.

#9.   "Hezekiah Wyman and the Legend of the White Horseman"
                This blog post is from 2011 and gets a lot of hits around Patriot’s Day (April 19th- the anniversary of the Battles of Lexington and Concord- when this episode in history took place).  I’m not sure why so many people are googling the story of Hezekiah Wyman, the guerilla sharp shooter who picked off many of the British regulars as they retreated back towards Boston. It’s a good story, but rarely found in any history books.

#8.  "The Five Kernels of Corn Myth at Thanksgiving"
                This is another perennial favorite, and gets hundreds of hits every Thanksgiving since it was first published in 2013. I should try a re-write next Thanksgiving with updated information.

#7.  "Ten Things to Know About Researching a Pilgrim in Your Family Tree"
                This post blew up my statistics for 2015, and made November one of my best months, passing over 60,000 hits over all for that month.  Pilgrim stories are very popular on my blog (see #8 above).

#6.  "A Funny Thing Happened on Our Way to Pick up Photo Prints"
                This is another perennial favorite, and was picked up by Pinterest last year and still gets most of its hits referred from Pinterest.  This is interesting since I stopped using Pinterest around the same time that this post was published.  I guess the blog post sharing on Pinterest has taken on a life of its own with me even promoting my blogs anymore.

#5.  "Fruitlands exhibit of “New England Portraits” "
                Two years ago this blog post was picked up by a knitting website (one of the featured folk art portraits shows a woman knitting), and went on a mini viral trip that still draws a lot of knitters to my blog from the "Ravelry" website.  I hope they learn to love genealogy as much as knitting!

#4.  "Surname Saturday ~ FOWLE of Charlestown and Woburn, Massachusetts"
                It is very funny to me that this particular family FOWLE made the top ten list.  They are not a very well known family.  Didn’t come on the Mayflower. No Revolutionary War generals. No presidential or royal connections.  Its a true mystery why the FOWLE post has thousands of hits.

#3.   "10 Unexpected Places to Find Family History Online"
                This blog post from earlier in 2015 has over 6,000 hits and still gets hundreds of hits each month.  It will be interesting to see if it remains popular and stays on the top ten list next year, too.

#2.  "Flora Stewart – Black History Month in Londonderry"
                The photo of former house slave Flora Stewart that was published with this blog post went viral on Pinterest two years ago.  It was picked up by several African American websites and chat groups, and  I still get many hits from some very interesting Black history websites.  I’m glad this one was so popular, and that this obscure housemaid from Londonderry, New Hampshire is becoming so famous online!

#1.  "A Favorite Christmas Gift!  You might want one, too!"
                OK, this one is barely about genealogy, but it continues to be a favorite on my blog.  Right away, back in 2012 it was picked up by Pinterest, Buzzfeed,, Tipsted and other crafty type websites and blogs. It has over 200,000 hits and grows by leaps and bounds, especially every Christmas and Mother’s Day.  This past month It gained another 18,000 hits. I hope that a few of the crafty readers also pick up a love of family history and check out my other blog posts, too!

Top Ten Traffic Sources for 2015

1. Google
2.  BuzzFeed
3. Pinterest
4.  Facebook
5.  Nutfield Genealogy
6.  Bing
7.  Yahoo
8.  Google.UK
9.  Tipsted
10.  Clark Howard

Other odd facts-
      First blog post -  27 July 2009
      Total posts 2077
      Published comments (minus spam)  4161
      Page views all time history  1, 521,235 (as of January 1, 2016)

Top Five Search Keywords (phrases)
1.  "White Horse"
2.  "Nutfield Genealogy"
3. "Flora Stewart"
4.  "Thanksgiving Proclamation"
5. "Tombstone"

Total Blog Posts by Year
2009  - 75 posts
2010  - 337 posts
2011  - 341 posts
2012  - 346 posts
2013  - 349 posts
2014  - 309 posts
2015  -  291 posts  (In the last two years I moved and then had a grandbaby- good excuses?)

Total number of views of these pages:

"Surnames to 9 Generations"                 16,640
"Descendants of Thomas Wilkinson"    11,665
"Descendants of Samuel Wilkinson"       7,649
"Awards"                                                  6,180
"Honor Roll Project"                                6,169 (this has moved to its own webpage)
"New England Genealogy Bloggers"       5,709

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Published under a Creative Commons License
Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Top Ten Blog Posts for 2015", Nutfield Genealogy, posted January 10, 2016, (  http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/01/top-ten-blog-posts-for-2015.html: accessed [access date]).