Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Weathervane Wednesday ~ Seen at the Beach

Weathervane Wednesday is an on-going series of photographs I post every week.  I started out by publishing only weather vanes from the Londonderry area, but now I've been finding interesting weather vanes from all over New England.  Sometimes these weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are very unique.  Often, my readers tip me off to some very special and unusual weather vanes.  This weathervane was photographed and sent in to me by a blog reader.

Today's weather vane is from somewhere in Massachusetts.

Do you know the location of weather vane #303?  Scroll down to see the answer...



Again, reader and fellow genealogy blogger Sara Campbell has sent in another great weathervane photo.  Sara has a summer house in Eastham, Massachusetts (on Cape Cod).  She photographed this heron weathervane seen over the dunes from Campground Beach in Eastham.  This beach is on the bay side of Cape Cod, and is known for its warm, calm water compared to the beaches on the Atlantic side.  

Herons and other wading birds are popular weathervanes for beach houses.  I've seen quite a few in New Hampshire, and we only have 13 miles of coastline! 

Click here to see the entire series of Weathervane Wednesday posts!

-------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~ Seen at the Beach", Nutfield Genealogy, posted October 26, 2016,  (  http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/03/weathervane-wednesday-seen-at-beach.html: accessed [access date]).

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Rev. Thomas Weld and wife Elizabeth, Rev. Nathaniel Prentice, early ministers at Nashua, New Hampshire

This tombstone was photographed at the Old Dunstable Burying Ground in Nashua, New Hampshire



REV.
THOMAS WELD
BORN JUNE, 1653;
SETTLED AS
THE FIRST MINISTER
OF THE CHURCH IN 
DUNSTABLE, DEC 1685
PROBABLY MASSACRED
BY THE INDIANS
WHILE DEFENDING THE
SETTLEMENT
JUNE 7, 1702
AEt. 49



REV.
NATH'L PRENTICE
BORN DEC. 1698
SETTLED AS THE
SECOND MINISTER OF
DUNSTABLE 1720
DIED FEB. 25, 1737
AEt. 39


ELIZABETH
WIFE OF
THOMAS WELD
DIED JULY 29,  1687
AEt. 31



The Old Dunstable Burial Ground is located on the Daniel Webster Highway, not far from the Massachusetts border.  The proximity to Massachusetts makes this part of the tax free city of Nashua a busy shopping area.  This impressive tombstone is in the southwest corner of the cemetery, away from the busy traffic and shopping malls on Daniel Webster Highway.  It was erected by the city more than 250 years after the death of Rev. Thomas Weld, the first minister at Dunstable, which became the city of Nashua.

According to the book The History of Nashua, page 176 “That portion of the above inscription which refers to the Rev. Mr. Weld’s being massacred by the Indians is legendary, and probably mythical, as there was no Indian War waging in 1702, nor for several years before or after that date.  It should be corrected.”    The next paragraph also reads: “Mrs. Elizabeth Weld was a daughter of Hon. Edward Tyng.  Her mother’s native place was Dunstable, England, and our Dunstable received its name in compliment to her.”

Rev. Thomas Weld is my 2nd cousin 11 generations removed.  We are both descendants of Edmund Weld (1559 - 1608), a cloth merchant of Sudbury, Suffolk, England.  Edmund's son Joseph Weld (1598 - 1646) was my 11th great grandfather and a settler at Roxbury, Massachusetts.  Joseph's brother, Rev, Thomas Weld (1595 - 1660) was a minister in Roxbury.  His grandson is the Rev. Thomas Weld who became the first minister of the first church at Dunstable.  This congregation still exists as the First Church of Nashua.

Rev. Thomas Weld was born 12 June 1653 in Roxbury, and died 9 June 1702 in Dunstable.  He was married twice, first to Elizabeth Wilson on 9 November 1681.  She was the daughter of John Wilson and Sarah Hooker (daughter of Rev. Thomas Hooker of Hartford, Connecticut).  His second wife was Mary Savage, the daughter of Habijah Savage and Hannah Tyng.  You can see that the book The History of Nashua was wrong about the wife buried here in Nashua with Rev. Weld.

The inscription about the Indian massacre is certainly wrong.  A diary by John Marshall of Dunstable has an entry for 1702 "Mem. on the 11th day of June last, Mr. Thomas Weld, the pastor of the Church of Dunstable was buryed he was an eminent preacher of the word of god, a man well beloued and much Lamented by them that knew him.  His death is justly to be accounted a great Loss to the pouince in genrall and to the poor town of dunstable in particuler.

I previously blogged about Rev. Thomas Weld at this link:
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2010/12/first-church-of-nashua.html   

A PDF from the Nashua Public Library of The History of Nashua,  1897, epitaphs from the Old Dunstable Burying Ground are on pages 175 – 183. 


------------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday ~  Rev. Thomas Weld and wife Elizabeth, Rev. Nathaniel Prentice, early ministers at Nashua, New Hampshire", Nutfield Genealogy, posted March 21, 2017, (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/03/tombstone-tuesday-rev-thomas-weld-and.html: accessed [access date]). 

Monday, March 20, 2017

My Grandmother’s Diary ~ Part 15, June 26 – July 7, 1920

1929 Children sleeping on a fire escape
http://www.gettyimages.com/license/514697594

How did people survive sleeping during heat waves before air conditioning?  You can find out how my grandmother survived this in her school girl diary.

This is the 15th installment of my grandmother's diary from 1920.  Her name was Gertrude Hitchings (1905 - 2001), and she was living on Elliott Street in Beverly, Massachusetts.  Gertrude was a 14 year old school girl when she kept this little journal.  The book is a tiny 3", and every Monday I publish a new section, with transcriptions of the tiny handwriting.  You can read the first installment HERE.  I'll post more of this diary every week for Amanuensis Monday.



SAT.  JUNE 26, 1920
Got up at 7.30 had breakfast
went over Mrs Butler’s at 9. Came
home had dinner.  Ethel
came down. Rus and Mr. Lowell
over to supper.  Went up to the
store after supper.  Home all
evening went to bed at 10.30

SUNDAY 27
Got up at 9 had breakfast
went over Mrs. Butler’s at 10.15
came home stayed home all morning
after dinner Mildred and I
went to walk up reservoir
Home all evening went to
bed out in the tent at 9.30.

MONDAY 28
Got up at 6.45. Went
over Butler’s at 9.  Came
home at 1 home all
afternoon reading home
all evening went to bed
in the tent at 10.

NOTE:   In these diary entries Gertrude mentions sleeping in the tent.  This was another version of sleeping outside on a sleeping porch during the hot summer weather.  In the days before air conditioning some people used to set up sleeping pavilions in their back yard.  That must have been fun!

The reservoir she mentions here must be the Folly Hill Reservoir, which was not far from Elliott Street. She mentions her brother Russell, his wife Ethel, her sister Mildred, and the boarder Mr. Lowell who was usually there on weekends.

TUES. JUNE 29, 1920
Got up at 7.45 went
over Butler’s all morning
went downtown for Mrs. B.
Helen and baby up all day
Went up Danvers played tennis
after dinner.  home all evening
and went to bed at 10.30

WEDNESDAY 30
Got up at 7.15 went
over Butler’s all morning
came home at 12.45. After
dinner went to ride with
Ella ??? came home
got supper.  Went out with the
bunch around here.  Bed at 10.30

THURSDAY, JULY 1
Got up at 7.15 went over
Mrs. Butler’s at 8.30 and went
downtown.  Down Ella’s all
afternoon.  After supper went
to walk with the kids
went to bed at 10.15

NOTE:  Gertrude mentions her sister Helen, her friend Ella, and going to work for Mrs. Butler (housework?). 




FRI. JULY 2, 1920
Got up at 7.15 went over
Butler’s all morning.  After
dinner went downtown with
Ida & Eunice got a pair of shoes
Came home at 5. After supper
Went riding with Ella and
Gladys.  Went to bed at 10.

SATURDAY 3
Got up at 7.30 went over to
Mrs. Butler’s all morning
worked home all afternoon
rained hard all day Mr.
Lowell over In the afternoon.
Stayed home all evening and
Read went to bed at 9.30

SUNDAY 4
Got up at 8.30 had break
fast at 9. Home all the morn
ing.  After dinner went to
walk came home at 5.
Stayed up all night watched
Bonfire went to bed at 1 A.M.

NOTE:  Gertrude mentions her friends Ida, Gladys and Ella; and her sister Eunice.  She mentions the boarder Mr. Lowell and working at Mrs. Butler’s house.  On the 4th of July she went to see a bonfire until well after midnight! I wonder if she slept out in the tent that night? 

MON. JULY 5, 1920
Got up at 8.30 went over
to Butler’s home all morning
Ellsworth, Helen & baby up Mr. Lowell
too.  After dinner went
down to Ella’s.  After supper
went to ride.  Came home watched
fireworks went to bed at 10.45

TUESDAY 6
Got up at 7.30 over Mrs.
Butler’s all the morning
Went down Ella’s after dinner
and then went down
town.  After supper went
down Ella’s a while, we
slept in the tent bed at 9.15

WEDNESDAY 7
Got up at 5 had break
fast at 6.45.  Went on the
Sunday school picnic up
to Idlewood had a
swell time home at 8.
Went to bed at 10.

NOTE:   The firework display was on the night after the 4th of July.  She mentions her sister Helen, brother-in-law Ellsworth, friend Ella, and the boarder Mr. Lowell.   Her Sunday school picnic was at Idlewood Park in Wenham where she “had a swell time”.  Gertrude hardly ever mentions church or Sunday school in her diary, but it was an important part of her life growing up.

Click here for another diary entry about Idlewood Park:

-------------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "My Grandmother’s Diary ~ Part 15, June 26 – July 7, 1920", Nutfield Genealogy, posted March 20, 2017, ( http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/03/my-grandmothers-diary-part-15-june-26.html: accessed [access date]). 

Saturday, March 18, 2017

Surname Saturday ~ WEBB of Salem

Salem, 1700

WEBB

Jonathan Webb (1690 – 1765), my 7th great grandfather, is another brickwall ancestor.  There are many possible WEBB families in the area from whom he might descend.  Several online trees have him as the son of John Webb and Susannah Cunliffe of Northampton, Massachusetts, which is very far from Salem, Massachusetts where Jonathan lived and died.  There were several possible Webbs right in Salem including a John Webb who bought land in 1669.  But now his ancestry is a mystery.

Jonathan Webb was a “coaster”, which meant he sailed fishing small boats up and down the coast of Massachusetts and New England.  He owned a house at the corner of Derby and Hardy Streets in Salem.  I find this amazing because the family continued to live in this neighborhood until my great grandfather was born!  He was also a deacon at the East Society church, where Rev. William Bentley would have his famous diary a few generations later.  The East Society church stood on Essex Street. 

His daughter, Mary (1724 – 1790), is my 6th great grandmother.  She married Joseph Cloutman and they lived on Webb Street, named after her father’s land.  Webb Street is still in existence in Salem,  at the end of Essex Street, near Collins Cove.   There are several streets in this area named after my ancestors- Webb, Boardman, Becket,  Lemon, and Beadle Lane which is now called Pleasant Street in Salem.

My sources for this information on Jonathan Webb come from The Essex Antiquarian, Volume 23, page 71 (property information), The Essex County Registry of Deeds, book 115, leaf 76, and the book The Driver Family: A genealogical memoir of the descendants of Robert and Phebe Driver of Lynn, Mass. , by Harriet Ruth (Waters) Cooke, 1889 (which is also available online at archive.org and at Google Book search).

My WEBB genealogy:

Generation 1:   Jonathan Webb, born about 1690, died before 1765; married on 23 March 1714 in Salem, Massachusetts to Priscilla Bray, daughter of Robert Bray and Christian Collins.  She was born 11 March 1690 in Salem and died after 4 Feb 1767.  Nine children.

Generation 2:  Mary Webb, born 17 December 1724 in Salem, died 21 March 1790 in Salem; married on 16 June 1747 in Salem to Joseph Cloutman, son of Joseph Cloutman and Mary Peters. He was born about 1720.  Four children.

Generation 3:  Joseph Cloutman m. Hannah Becket
Generation 4:  Mary Cloutman m. Abijah Hitchings
Generation 5:  Abijah Hitchings m. Eliza Ann Treadwell
Generation 6:  Abijah Franklin Hitchings m. Hannah Eliza Lewis
Generation 7:  Arthur Treadwell Hitchings m. Florence Etta Hoogerzeil
Generation 8:  Gertrude Matilda Hitchings m. Stanley Elmer Allen (my grandparents)


------------------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Surname Saturday ~ WEBB of Salem", Nutfield Genealogy, posted April 8, 2017, (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/03/surname-saturday-webb-of-salem.html: accessed [access date]). 

Surname Saturday ~ RANDALL of Boston, Another Brickwall Ancestor


I have two RANDALL lines, that seem to be completely unrelated. In 2015 I wrote a Surname Saturday post on Richard Randall (1633 – 1713) of Saco, Maine.  This second lineage starts with a possible 7th great grandfather,  Stephen Randall, a mariner who died in Boston before 18 May 1742.  He is a mystery and a brickwall since I do not know his origins or his parents’ names.  Nor do I know his birth date.

The first and earliest record I found for Stephen Randall was that he served as a private in the Colonial Wars from 22 November 1724 to 22 May 1725, 26 months, in Colonel Thomas Westbrook’s Company.  Next to his name it reads “Of Boston”.  The next record I found for Stephen Randall was a probate record granting his widow, Sarah, guardianship of his son “Andros a. about 4 in right of his father Stephen Randall of Boston late deceased, mariner, May 18, 1742”.   Sadly, just a few years later a man named John Hill was made guardian for “Andrus Randall, a. abt. 11, son of Stephen, mariner & Sarah, both deceased, Mar. 1749/50”.  I have not been able to find a death record for Stephen or Sarah, the parents.

In the Thwing Collection, Inhabitants and Estates of the Town of Boston, 1630 – 1822 there is a listing for Stephen Randall, who married Sarah Cannon on 16 January 1729.  Their children are listed as:

1. Abigail, born 20 March 1730
2. Elizabeth, born 7 January 1732/3
3. Mary, born 10 January 1734/5
4. Stephen, born 5 December 1736
5. Andros, born 20 February 1739

[Note that this record does NOT name a daughter named Sarah Randall.  In the Boston Births 1700 – 1809 there is a “Sarah Randall, daughter of Stephen and Sarah Randall, born 16 October 1729", so we know that there is a Sarah in this family group.  Another good clue is that a man named William Randall married Elizabeth Hill in Boston on 10 December 1691 [Torrey’s Marriages, Volume II, page 1247].  Could this be a relative to the mysterious John Hill who was named guardian to Andros Randall?]

In the Boston Marriages 1700 – 1809 there is a record:  “Benjamin Gardner to Sarah Kendall, Dec. 1, 1751 West Church”   Benjamin Gardner and his first wife Sarah Randall are my 6th great grandparents.  He was a Boston ropemaker who removed to Salem around the time of the Revolutionary War.  The Boston Marriages  record is a transcription of church records, famous for mistakes.  Could Sarah Kendall be a Sarah Randall?   Sarah (Randall/Kendall) Gardner died in 1781 in Salem, Massachusetts, the mother to three children:  Mary (my 5th great grandmother), Benjamin b. 1753, and Sarah b. 1755. 

Does anyone know the story behind this RANDALL / KENDALL / GARDNER mystery?  Please leave a comment below or email vrojomit@gmail.com

Thank you!


My previous blog post on Richard Randall of Saco, Maine:

My RANDALL? genealogy:

Generation 1:  Sarah (possible surname RANDALL or KENDALL) possibly born 16 October 1729 in Boston, daughter of Stephen Randall and Sarah Cannon, died in 1781 in Salem, Massachusetts; married on 10 October 1751 at the West Church in Boston to Benjamin Gardner.  He was born about 1720 in Boston and died 7 June 1797 in Salem.  Three children.

Generation 2:  Mary Gardner; married 24 June 1775 in Lynn, Massachusetts to Abijah Hitchings.  He was born 18 January 1753 in Lynn and died 27 March 1826 in Salem.  Four children.

Generation 3:  Abijah Hitchings m. Mary Cloutman

Generation 4:  Abijah Hitchings m. Eliza Ann Treadwell

Generation 5: Abijah Franklin Hitchings m. Hannah Eliza Lewis

Generation 6: Arthur Treadwell Hitchings m. Florence Etta Hoogerzeil

Generation 7: Gertrude Matilda Hitchings m. Stanley Elmer Allen (my grandparents)


----------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Surname Saturday ~ RANDALL of Boston, Another Brickwall Ancestor", Nutfield Genealogy, posted March 18, 2017, (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/03/surname-saturday-randall-of-boston.html: accessed [access date]).

Friday, March 17, 2017

Uncle Don and Uncle Buddy

This photograph was taken at 10 Roosevelt Avenue in Hamilton, Massachusetts in the late 1930s.  It looks like it was winter because they are all bundled up in snowsuits and hats.



These are two of my mother's five brothers, Donald Franklin and Joseph Gilman Allen.  They are the two children born just before Mom out of the seven children in the Allen family.  No one ever called Joseph by his given name, he was always known as Buddy.  Both these uncles are still living in Massachusetts.  This photo is from my grandmother's album, and that is her handwriting on the margin.  She was always good about labeling her family photographs.  Well... most of them! 

-------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Uncle Donnie and Uncle Buddy", Nutfield Genealogy, posted March 17, 2017,  (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/03/uncle-don-and-uncle-buddy.html: accessed [access date]). 

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Weathervane Wednesday ~ A Fancy Sailing Ship

Weathervane Wednesday is an on-going series of photographs I post weekly.  I started out by publishing only weather vanes from the Londonderry area, but now I've been finding interesting weather vanes from all over New England.  Sometimes these weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are very unique.  Often, my readers tip me off to some very special and unusual weather vanes.

Today's weather vane was photographed in Massachusetts.

Do you know the location of weather vane #302?  Scroll down to see the answer...





Today's weathervane was photographed in Manchester-by-the-Sea, Massachusetts.  It is on a large cupola above the public library.  The library is located next door to the First Parish Church, which has a beautiful old weathercock I blogged about in 2014.  From this angle you can see both weathervanes!

We have photographed many sailing ship weathervanes in New England, but this is one of the most fanciful and imaginative.  The sails are decorated with stars, and the masts are decorated with fluttering banners.  It is only a two-dimensional weather vane, but it is whimsical and fun.  This library is located just a few steps from the harbor, and Manchester-by-the-Sea was the home of many sea captains and mariners over the years.  A sailing ship is the perfect choice for this location.  There are no cardinal points on this weather vane.

The stone library was designed by Charles F. McKim, a famous architect of many New England and American landmarks, including the Boston Public Library and New York's Penn Station.  The stained glass windows were designed by Tiffany.  You can read all about the history of this little gem of a library in the link below.

Manchester-by-the-Sea Public Library website:  http://www.manchesterpl.org/

First Parish Church, Manchester-by-the-Sea weathervane blog post:  https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/07/weathervane-wednesday-very-old.html  


Click here to see the entire series of Weathervane Wednesday posts!  


-----------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo,  "Weathervane Wednesday ~ A Fancy Sailing Ship", Nutfield Genealogy, posted March 15, 2017, (  http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/03/weathervane-wednesday-fancy-sailing-ship.html:  accessed [access date]).

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Catherine Fitch, wife of Ovid Houston, at Nashua, New Hampshire

This tombstone was photographed at the Old Dunstable Burying Ground on the Daniel Webster Highway in Nashua, New Hampshire


Memento Mori
ERECTED IN MEMOry
of Mrs Catherinah
Houston 2d wife
to Mr. Ovid
Houston who
departed this Life
Novr. 17th 1778 In
ye 45th year of her age.
Blessed are the dead
which die in the Lord.

closeup


Catherine Fitch died 17 November 1778 at age 45.  She married Ovid Houston, as his second wife, at Lincoln, Massachusetts on 25 December 1770.  The first wife, Jemima Colburn,  the daughter of Ezra Colburn and Thankful Richardson, born on 19 September 1747 in Dracut and died on 26 December 1765 in Dunstable, aged 27, is buried next to Catherine.  Jemima married Ovid Houston on 6 May 1762. 

Ovid Houston owned a tavern in Dunstable, near what is now the Tyngsborough depot.  The building was previously built by Henry Farwell, Jr. in 1727.   He had two children with Catherine, Lucy born in 1771, and Grant, born in 1772, who removed to Ashburnham, Massachusetts.

There is a surviving letter from Ovid Houston to Cyrus Baldwin, written from Dunstable on 4 August 1780 in the papers of Loammi Baldwin (1740 – 1807), held at the Houghton Library at Harvard University under the call number MS Am 1811.   I have previously written about Loammi Baldwin, soldier and civil engineer from Woburn, Massachusetts, at this link:

Ovid Houston’s name is mentioned several times in The Diary of  Matthew Patten of Bedford, NH: from 1754 - 1788, published 1903. Most of the mentions are of business transactions.   He is listed in the 1790 census of Tyngsborough as “Ovid Hewstin”. 

 A PDF from the Nashua Public Library of The History of Nashua, 1897  epitaphs from the Old Dunstable Burying Ground are on pages 175 – 183. 

----------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday ~ Catherine Fitch, wife of Ovid Houston, at Nashua, New Hampshire", Nutfield Genealogy, posted March 14, 2017, ( http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/03/tombstone-tuesday-catherine-fitch-wife.html: accessed [access date]). 

Monday, March 13, 2017

My Grandmother’s Diary ~ Part 14, June 14 – 25, 1920

My Grandmother’s Diary ~ Part 14, June 14 – 25, 1920

My grandmother (the girl on the left with the tennis raquet) and her tennis friends
Beverly, Massachusetts circa 1920.  Does anyone know the other faces in this photo? 

This is the 14th installment of my grandmother's diary from 1920.  Her name was Gertrude Hitchings (1905 - 2001), and she was living on Elliott Street in Beverly, Massachusetts.  Gertrude was a 14 year old school girl when she kept this diary.  The book is a tiny 3", and every Monday I publish a new section, with transcriptions of the tiny handwriting.  You can read the first installment HERE.  I'll post more of this diary every week for Amanuensis Monday.



MON. JUNE 14, 1920
Got up at 7.00 went to
school home 1.15 Marion
up after dinner.  Went to
Ella’s at 4. After supper went
up Danvers played tennis with
Bob.  Mr. Lowell over. Eunice’s
Birthday went to bed at 10.15

TUESDAY 15
Got up at 7.00 went to
school home 1.15 Stayed
home all afternoon it
rained.  Pa went up to
Russell’s.  Went out a
little while after supper
Came in 8.45 bed at 10.45

WEDNESDAY 16
Got up at 7.00 went to
school had an assembly home
at 1.15.  Home all afternoon
After supper Marion up.
Went to walk with Ethel up
Danvers. Went to bed at 10.00

NOTE:   The end of the school year is coming, and Gertrude had an assembly at school.  She mentions her first cousin Marion, and friends Ella and Bob.  Mr. Lowell was their boarder, who appears to come and go (traveling salesman?).   Pa visited Russell, the eldest son who was married to Ethel.   To “walk up [to] Danvers” was not far since they lived on Elliott Street, near the Danvers line.

THURS.  JUNE 17, 1920
                Rain
Got up at 9.00 had break
fast stayed home all
the morning as it
rained.  Home all after
noon, Eunice down to Helen’s
After supper Gordon & I went
to movies home 10.15 bed at 10.45

FRIDAY 18
              Rain
Got up at 7.15 went to
school.  Last day.  Got
home 1.15 stayed at
home all the after
noon.  Rained all day.
Home all evening tatting
Went to bed at 10.00

SATURDAY 19
Got up at 7.45 worked
around the house all
morning.  Home all after
noon.  After supper went down
to the beach (Fireman’s Day)  Came
home 10.15 bed at 10.30


NOTE:   School is out for the summer.    Gertrude mentions her sisters Eunice and Helen (who was married and lived nearby), and her brother Gordon.   Fireman’s Day was a day with a parade and drills by the city fire department, as well as a fundraiser.   It must have been held at one of the local beaches, but Gertrude didn’t mention which one she visited that day.



SUN. JUNE 20, 1920
Got up at 9.15 had
breakfast went over
golf links after strawberries
with Pa.  After dinner went to
walk with Ella.  Helen, Ellsworth,
Rus, Ethel & Mr. Lowell over home
all evening went to bed at 10.15

MONDAY 21
Got up at 7.45 had
breakfast at 8 stayed home
all morning tatting and
home all afternoon before
supper went to the store.  Went
out after supper came in
at 9.15 went to bed at 10.

TUESDAY 22
Got up at 7.30 had break
fast.  Home all morning went
to the store before dinner.
Home all afternoon had a thun-
der shower.  Home all evening
reading went to bed at 10


NOTE:  Gertrude mentions picking strawberries at the “golf links” with Pa.  They lived very close to what is now the Beverly Country Club, but in 1920 it was the United Shoe Golf Course.  Her Pa worked at the “The Shoe” as a draftsman.   She mentions her friend Ella, her sister Helen (married to Ellsworth), and brother Russell (married to Ethel), and the boarder Mr. Lowell. 

WED.  JUNE 23, 1920
Got up at 6.45 went
back to school got my points
came home 9.15 went to the
store.  Went up Ethel’s after dinner
After supper the whole family
went to Rus. (his birthday) came
home 10.45 went to bed at 11.15

THURSDAY 24
Got up at 8.00 had break
fast stayed home all
the morning.  Went out
after dinner around the town.
After supper went riding
with Gladys and Brick
went to bed at 10.30

FRIDAY 25
Got up at 7.15 had break
fast worked over to
Mrs. Butler’s all morning
& afternoon.  Before supper
picked strawberries.  After supper played
tennis with Bob went to bed at 10.15


NOTE:   Although school was closed for the summer, Gertrude went back to get her “points” (grades).  I wish I had a copy of that report card!  She mentions the whole family was a Russell’s house for his birthday.  She went riding (bicycles? Trolley car?) with friend’s Gladys and Brick.  More strawberries, and more tennis with Bob.  Was he one of her boyfriends? 

I don't have a report card from Gertrude, but my aunt found this
certificate tucked inside the little diary.  She graduated in 1923.
What was grade 13?


-----------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "My Grandmother’s Diary ~ Part 14, June 14 – 25, 1920", Nutfield Genealogy, posted March 13, 2017, (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/03/my-grandmothers-diary-part-14-june-14.html: accessed [access date]). 

Saturday, March 11, 2017

Surname Saturday ~ HUDSON of Boston, Massachusetts


William Hudson (1588 – 1661/2), my 11th great grandfather, and his three eldest sons were the some of the first people to settle in Boston, Massachusetts.  He was admitted to the Boston church as member number 67, which was in the winter of 1630 – 1631.  He was made a Freeman that next May 18th.   His wife, Susan, was admitted to the church in Boston as member number 123 later in 1631.   Susan gave birth to a fourth son, Nathaniel, on 30 January 1633/4.

William Hudson was a baker, and owned property in Boston.  He returned to Chatham, in Kent, England around 1645.  On 29 April 1656 he gave power of attorney to his two eldest sons, William, Jr. and Francis, to sell his properties in Boston.  It is assumed that he died in England and never returned to Boston.

William arrived in Boston with three sons, including Francis Hudson (1618 – 1700), my 10th great grandfather.  Francis was a ferryman and an innkeeper.  He ran the ferry between Boston and Chelsea (Winnisimmet), and had a license to sell liquors at his inn. His will was written in 1697 and it mentions his wife, Elizabeth, son-in-law Arthur Smith, a Perkins daughter, and grandsons Francis Hudson, Samuel Hudson, and his wife’s grandchild John Wheatley.  His death was recorded as 3 November 1700, at age 82,  in Boston by Judge Sewell as “one of the first men who set foot on the peninsula of Boston”. 

Francis Hudson owned land near the Winnissimmet ferry which was known as Hudson’s Point.  According to the book Historical Sketch of Copp's Hill Burying Ground, by John Norton, 1919 (unnumbered pages) "At the junction of Charter and Commercial Streets was "Ye Mylen Point", so called in 1635, and later known as Hudson's Point, whence Francis Hudson, the fisherman who became a ferryman, ran his ferry to Charlestown and Chelsea."  This spot is near the MDC skating rink along the harbor today, not far from the North Washington Street bridge to Charlestown.  

An interesting piece of trivia about Francis Hudson is that he was appointed to be “the culler of fish” in Boston in 1663 and 1664.  This was an inspector of fresh fish brought in by fishermen, who examined the catch before it went to market.  He was also voted in as “Measurer of Salt” in 1659.  These were important positions in the days when salt fish (cod) was an important business in New England.

I descend from Francis’s youngest child, Sarah Hudson (b. 1653) who married Arthur Smith in Boston about 1677.  They were my 9th great grandparents.  Arthur Smith was a shipwright.  They are buried at Copp’s Hill Burying Ground in the North End of Boston.  His epitaph supposedly reads “Here lyes intered ye Body of ARTHUR SMITH aged about 63 years died May ye 17 1708”, but I have not been able to find this headstone.

For the truly curious:

The Great Migration Begins, by Charles Robert Charles Anderson, Volume II, pages 1035 - 1037

The American Genealogist, Volume 17, page 14

Pioneers of Massachusetts, by Charles Henry Pope, 1900, page 246
Inhabitants and Estates of the Town of Boston, 1630 – 1822 (Thwing Collection) at www.americanancestors.org

A Documentary History of Chelsea, by Jenny Chamberlain Watts, and William Richard Cutter,  Volume 2, page 101

Early New England Families, 1641 - 1700. (Original Online Database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2013. (By Alicia Crane Williams, Lead Genealogist.)

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My HUDSON genealogy:

Generation 1:   William Hudson, born about 1588 in England; died after 17 Feb 1661/2 in England; married about 1613 to Susan Unknown.  Four sons.

Generation 2:  Francis Hudson, born about 1618 in England, died 3 November 1700 in Boston, Massachusetts; married first to Mary Unknown, born about 1620 in England and died 25 September 1694 in Boston.  Seven children.

Generation 3:  Sarah Hudson, born 27 November 1653 in Boston; married about 1677 to Arthur Smith.  He was born about 1645 and died 17 May 1708 in Boston.  Four children.

Generation 4: Sarah Smith m. Andros Cannon
Generation 5: Sarah Cannon m. Stephen Randall
Generation 6:  Sarah Randall m. Benjamin Gardner
Generation 7: Mary Gardner m. Abijah Hitchings
Generation 8: Abijah Hitchings m. Mary Cloutman
Generation 9: Abijah Hitchings m. Eliza Ann Treadwell
Generation 10:  Abijah Franklin Hitchings m. Hannah Eliza Lewis
Generation 11: Arthur Treadwell Hitchings m. Florence Etta Hoogerzeil
Generation 12:  Gertrude Matilda Hitchings m. Stanley Elmer Allen (my grandparents)

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Surname Saturday ~ HUDSON of Boston, Massachusetts", Nutfield Genealogy, posted March 11, 2017,  (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/03/surname-saturday-hudson-of-boston.html: accessed [access date]).

Friday, March 10, 2017

Top Ten Genealogy "Close Calls"



What’s a “Genealogy Close Call”?  It happens when I research an ancestor and realize that if fate didn’t intervene I wouldn’t be here today.  Some of our ancestors narrowly escaped disasters, only to live on and produce a descendant that led to YOU!   Read down the list, and you’ll instantly know what I mean.  I’m sure there are many “close calls” in your family tree, too.  Why don’t you tell me about some of these bits of serendipity in the comments?

Close Call No. 1:
John Howland (1592 – 1673) is my 9th great grandfather on both my mother’s side, and my father’s side of the family.  He had a very close call on his way to Massachusetts on board the ship Mayflower in 1620. Halfway across the Atlantic the Pilgrims encountered a great storm. For some unknown reason, the passenger John Howland was on deck instead of below with the other Pilgrims.  He fell overboard, but miraculously grabbed a rope that was hanging over the side of the ship, and he was hauled to safety.  Young John was described in William Bradford’s journal “though he was somewhat ill with it, yet he lived many years after.”  He later married Elizabeth Tilley, another passenger, and had many children, including the two daughters, Hope and Desire, from whom I descend.  If not for that rope, I wouldn’t be here today.

Close Call No. 2:
I have many ancestors who were involved in the 1692 Witchcraft Hysteria that hit Salem, Massachusetts. Three were hanged, many others were imprisoned, brought to trial, accused and otherwise abused.  The ones who were hanged (Bridget Bishop, John Proctor and George Jacobs) were past their prime, with grown children, so their deaths did not mean that my lineage never occurred.  However, I had one ancestress, Elizabeth Collston (b. 1676), my 7th great grandmother, who was arrested and imprisoned with her mother and grandmother.  At some point 16 year old Elizabeth Collston escaped.  And she escaped a second time weeks later!  Considering that she could have been brought to trial and hanged like the three ancestors mentioned above, she also could have died in jail because the conditions were appalling.  Lucky Elizabeth escaped, married in 1703, and had a daughter, Mary Collston, who was my 6th great grandmother.  Thank you Elizabeth!

Close Call No. 3:
My 7th great grandfather, William Munroe (1625 – 1718) was a Scots warrior in the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651.  The Scots lost the battle, and survivors were rounded up and marched without food to London to be shipped on board the John and Sarah to Boston to be sold into servitude.  If you read about the Scots prisoners of war, there were not many survivors of this bloody battle.  There were not many survivors of this forced march to London.  Some died on board the ship on their way to the New World. Somehow young William survived all this to be sold on the docks into servitude.  The Scots were not welcome in Puritan Boston, but most of these men survived and married and left many descendants.  William married in 1665 to Martha George and had four children, including my 6th great grandfather, George Munroe (about 1672 – 1747), and remarried twice more and had ten more children!  There are many descendants who feel quite grateful that William was a survivor!

Close Call No. 4:   
My 4th great grandfather, Johann Daniel Bollman (about 1751 – 1833) was born in Hammersleben, Saxony, Germany.  He was a surgeon, and a Hessian officer during the American Revolutionary War.  He served with Baron de Riedesel’s Brunswick Regiment.  They fought at the Battle of Bennington in August 1777 where about 200 Hessians were killed and 700 were captured.  Then they fought in September at the Battle of Saratoga where my ancestor was captured.  Most of the Germans were marched to prison camps near Boston.  However, since he was a doctor, he was one of the first men to be included in a prisoner exchange and sent to Halifax.  He settled in the town of Lunenburg, Nova Scotia – not far from Halifax.  He survived two bloody battles and being captured.  Dr. Bollman became a politician, as well as the town doctor.  He was a member of the House of Assembly and represented Lunenburg from 1793 - 1809.   He was a physician for 54 years and died at age 82.   Click this link to learn more about this ancestor:  https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/03/surname-saturday-bollman-my-hessian.html  

Close Call No. 5:
My 5th great grandfather, Levi Younger (1756 – 1806) served in the Revolutionary War as a seaman.  This wasn’t unusual because he was a mariner from Gloucester, Massachusetts.  However, what was unusual was that he was captured and sent to the prison ship “Favorite” in New York harbor.  If you read or Google what the conditions were like on those British prison ships you will wonder how Levi Younger survived this ordeal.  Then he was brought to Forten Prison at Gosport near Portsmouth in England.  Googling the story of Forten Prison will make your hair stand on end. Somehow young Levi survived all this, returned to Gloucester, and married in 1784.  He had five children, including Levi, Jr. (1786 – 1858), my 4th great grandfather.

Close Call No. 6:
Levi Younger, Jr. (1786 – 1858) is my 4th great grandfather.  His father  (see above) was captured as a seaman during the Revolutionary War.  Levi, Jr., was also a mariner, and when the War of 1812 occurred, he stepped in to serve his country in defense of the New England coast.  You guessed it – Levi was one of the many American sailors “impressed” into the British navy during the War of 1812.  He was listed as “refusing to do so service [and] have been punished”.  Like father like son.  He also survived his ordeal and was married in 1816 in Boston and had five children, including my 4th great grandmother, Mary Esther (Younger) Emerson described below.

Close Call No. 7:
This one is quite a story!  James Stilson, my 7th great grandfather, was born about 1680 in Maine near the Pemaquid River.  He was captured in 1689, along with his mother, two sisters and a brother, and taken by the Indians to Quebec, Canada.  His mother was redeemed after a few years, but James was not ransomed for 12 years.  He heard that a New England woman was still being held prisoner, and he went back to see her, and liked what he saw.  Her name was Hannah Odiorne, the widow of John Batson of Cape Porpoise, Maine.  He ransomed and married her in the Roman Catholic church of Notre Dame in Montreal.  They had both been baptized Roman Catholic during their captivity.  Their first child, Marie Anne Stilson dit Dutilly Odiorne was baptized Roman Catholic on 8 March 1707.  They were remarried in Boston upon returning to New England.   The baby baptized in Montreal is my 6th great grandmother, Hannah (AKA Marie Anne) who married Thomas Mead on 2 May 1725 in New Castle, New Hampshire.

Close Call No. 8:
Mary Esther Younger (1826 -1913) was my 3rd great grandmother. Her father was a mariner from Gloucester who lived in Boston.  Her mother died very young, leaving Esther motherless, and two little brothers also died at the same time.  Her father remarried, but there must be more to the story because Esther was adopted by her father’s sister and her husband, David Harris.  She was raised by the David Harris family (this was another longer story on how I puzzled out her real parents).   What kind of dreadful disease or accident took the mother and brothers? Was Mary Esther lucky to have survived?

Close Call No. 9:
George Emerson (1817 – 1890) was my 3rd great grandfather.  He was a young husband with a wife (Mary Esther Younger, above) and two small children when gold was discovered at Sutter’s Mills in California in 1848.  On February 4, 1849 George was one of the 100 members of the New England and California Trading and Mining Company that left Boston on board the ship Leonore for San Francisco.  Yes, he was “49er”!  They arrived 150 days later via Cape Horn in San Francisco Bay.  There are a few surviving diaries from other members of this group of gold miners, and one describes George Emerson as sick and dying, left by the side of a California creek to write his will.   Somehow George survived, and made his way home to Boston where he had six more children.  One was Mary Katharine Emerson, my great great grandmother.  She wouldn’t have been born if he had died in California, like many other 49ers.  Click this link to learn more about my '49er ancestor:  https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2009/08/george-emerson-forty-niner.html  

Close Call No. 10:
My great great grandfather, Abijah Franklin Hitchings (1841 – 1910) served twice in the Civil War. His second enlistment brought him with Company H, 19th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry to the Battle of Fredricksburg where he was shot in the leg on 13 December 1862.  He was discharge for his wounds on 25 July 1863 at Boston.  His leg wound was horrific, but he refused to let them amputate.  He suffered for the rest of his life from terrible diseases like necrosis.  I have a 100 page pension report with lots of pages of medical reports from his annual trips to the medical facilities at the Old Soldier’s Home in Chelsea, Massachusetts.  He walked with a cane for the rest of his life.  Fortunately, he was well enough to marry on 22 September 1864 and had two children, including my great grandfather, Arthur Treadwell Hitchings (1868 – 1937).   Personally, I think this is quite a miracle since we all know how terrible the medical attention was during the Civil War battles (not just from TV, but from historical accounts), and he lived through infections and necrosis in the years before antibiotics became available.  Look up necrosis – it’s quite nasty.   Click this link to learn more about A. F. Hitchings:  https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2009/11/how-to-find-your-american-veteran.html   


The image above is from the journal Blast from the Ram's Horn, 1902, page 249 https://archive.org/stream/blastsfromramsho00unse/blastsfromramsho00unse#page/n256/mode/1up

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Alona Tester, an Australian genealogy blogger, was inspired by this blog post and wrote her own about her Australian ancestors and their "Close Calls".  You can read these stories at this link:
http://www.lonetester.com/2017/03/genealogy-close-calls/

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Top Ten Genealogy "Close Calls", Nutfield Genealogy, posted March 10, 2017, (  http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/03/top-ten-genealogy-close-calls.html: accessed [access date]). 

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Weathervane Wednesday ~ A Long Horn Cow on the New England Coast

I post a series of weather vane photographs every Wednesday.  This started with images of weathervanes from the Londonderry, New Hampshire area, but now I've found interesting weather vanes all across New England and across the globe.  Sometimes my weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are interesting.  Often my readers tip me off to some very unique or unusual weathervanes, too!  If you know a great weather vane near you, let me know if you'd like to have it featured on this blog.

Today's weather vane is from somewhere in New Hampshire.

Do you know the location of weathervane post #301?  Scroll down to find the answer.






Usually on coastal roads in New England you can see plenty of weathervanes with lobsters, whales, ships and sailboats.  This is the first time I've seen a long horn steer anywhere on the coast, or anywhere in New England!

This is a finely detailed three dimensional weather vane. We took photos from every side of the building to get views of all the legs and horns.  There is also a great patina on this weathervane, although it is only 15 years old. The feathers and arrowhead on the arrow vane are gilded, and the letters representing the cardinal points are white or silver (we couldn't tell from our distance below the building).

Currier's Leather Gallery was established in 1982, and has been in this location on Route 1A since 2001.

Currier's Leather Furniture
75 Lafayette Road, Hampton Falls, NH
http://www.curriersleather.com/

Click here to see the entire series of Weathervane Wednesday posts!


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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~ A Long Horn Cow on the New England Coast", Nutfield Genealogy, posted March 8, 2016, (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/03/weathervane-wednesday-long-horn-cow-on.html: accessed [access date]).

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Deacon John Davidson and his wife Mary (Lancaster), Windham, New Hampshire

These tombstones were photographed at the Cemetery on the Plain, Windham, New Hampshire.


In memory of
DEA. JOHN
DAVIDSON
Died Oct. 25, 1835
AEt. 85
Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord



In Memory of
Mrs. Mary Davidson
wife of 
Dea. John Davidson
who died Jan 31, 1829
Aged 81 years

Blessed are the poor in spirit for
theirs is the kingdom of heaven.


Deacon John Davidson was the son of John Davidson, and the grandson of William Davidson, a Scots Irish immigrant.  He was born 5 March 1750 in Tewksbury, Massachusetts, and died 25 October 1835 in Windham, New Hampshire; married on 10 November 1774 to Mary Lancaster, daughter of Henry Lancaster and Dorothea Harvey.  She was born 16 June 1747 in Amesbury, Massachusetts. 

John Davidson was one of the first settlers in Belfast, Maine in 1770 along with other men from Windham including Deacon John Tuffts, Lieutenant James and John Gilmore.  He returned to Windham several times because of the hardships of life in Maine.  He married and lived with his wife in Maine, but when the Revolutionary War broke out they returned to Windham again, but they were very poor having left their possessions in Maine.  He served in the Revolutionary War.  Later in life he was made an elder in the Windham Presbyterian church, under the Reverend Samuel Harris. 

Children:

1. John, born in Belfast, Maine 1775, m. Abigail Prouty
2. Dorothy, born in Belfast, 1777 m. Thomas Tuffts
3. Sarah, born in Belfast 1779 m. Allenson Senter
4.  James, born in Windham, 1781 m Jan Davison, daughter of Francis Davidson
5. Henry, born in Windham, 1783 m. Jane Wear Dinsmoor
6. Mary, born 1785, m. Samuel Senter
7. Anna, born 1787, m. John Armstrong
8. William, born 1790, m. Clarissa Dinsmoor


The History of Windham in New Hampshire, by Leonard Morrison, 1883, pages 428 – 432 for a sketch of the John Davidson genealogy.


See also Reminiscences of John Davidson, a Maine Pioneer: Communicated to the New England Historical and Genealogical Register by Alfred Johnson, 1916 (available online at Google Books).  

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday ~ Deacon John Davidson and his wife Mary (Lancaster), Windham, New Hampshire", Nutfield Genealogy, posted February 7, 2017, ( http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/03/tombstone-tuesday-deacon-john-davidson.html: accessed [access date]).