Saturday, December 9, 2017

Surname Saturday ~ HENDERSON of Saco, Maine and Salem, Massachusetts


HENDERSON

In the late 1600s the early Maine settlers were in conflict with the Native people of the seacoast, and there were many massacres that killed people on both sides.  Large numbers of settlements were completely abandoned.  Many of these settlers fled to Salem and Marblehead, Massachusetts.  Some historians believe that the traumas experienced by many of these people, especially the children, may have led to the witch hysteria.

Peter Henderson (about 1649 – after 1700), my 9th great grandfather, was a fisherman from Saco, Maine. He married his probable brother’s step-daughter, Abigail Bully in 1670 in Saco (now Biddeford Poole, Maine).  The John Henderson who married Ellen Booth, the widow of Nicholas Bully is considered to be his brother or close kin.   In 1671 Peter was granted 12 acres of land next to John’s property.

Peter first appeared in the Salem records around 1677, after the first massacres in Maine.  In Salem Peter Henderson was known as a Master Mariner and “Fisher Captain”.  In 1683 he paid taxes in Salem and appeared in a lawsuit against Robert Bray, Sr., and Richard Bale “for abusive carriages on board to the master. Bale was fined and ordered to be whipped.”   Also in 1683 Peter Henderson’s ship “ketch, Sara, was chased ashore by pirates at Funchal [Madeira].  There was another incident with pirates in 1697 concerning Henderson’s ketch, Margaret.

Two of Peter’s sons, Peter and Benjamin, married two Beadle sisters, Elizabeth and Abigail.  See my BEADLE genealogy at this link:   https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/05/surname-saturday-beadle-of-salem.html   I descend from the daughter, Abigail Henderson (1676 – 1737), my 8th great grandmother, who married Jonathan Glover in 1699.  Abigail and Jonathan Glover were the grandparents of Major General John Glover (1732 – 1797) of Marblehead, the Revolutionary War hero.  Click this link for my GLOVER genealogy:  https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/09/surname-saturday-glover-of-salem-and.html

Some HENDERSON resources:

History of Saco and Biddeford, by George Folsom, 1830

Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire, by Sybil Noyes, Charles Thornton Libby and Walter Goodwin Davis, 1928-1939

“The Henderson Family of Salem” by G. Andrews Moriarty, Jr., Essex Institute Historical Collections, Volume 48 (1912), page 328. 


My HENDERSON genealogy: 

Generation 1:  Peter Henderson, born about 1649, died after 27 September 1700 in Salem, Massachusetts; married on 29 December 1670 in Salem to Abigail Bully, daughter of Nicholas Bully and Eleanor Booth.  She was born 1 February 1655 in Saco, Maine.  Five children.

Generation 2:  Abigail Henderson, born October 1676 in Salem, died 29 April 1737 in Salem; married on 31 March 1699 in Salem to Jonathan Glover, son of John Glover and Mary Guppy. He was born 13 April 1677 in Salem and died March 1736.  Six children

Generation 3: Jonathan Glover m. Tabitha Bacon
Generation 4: Daniel Glover m. Hannah Jillings.
Generation 5: Tabitha Glover m. Thomas Homan
Generation 6: Betsey Jillings Homan m. Jabez TREAdwell
Generation 7:  Eliza Ann Treadwell m. Abijah Hitchings
Generation 8:  Abijah Franklin Hithcings m. Hannah Eliza Lewis
Generation 9:  Gertrude Maria
Generation 10:  Gertrude Matilda Hitchings m. Stanley Elmer

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Surname Saturday ~ HENDERSON of Saco, Maine and Salem, Massachusetts", Nutfield Genealogy, posted December 9, 2017, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/12/surname-saturday-henderson-of-saco.html: accessed [access date]). 

Friday, December 8, 2017

Along the Pilgrim Trail ~ The Speedwell leaves the port of Delfshaven to join The Mayflower

Along the Pilgrim Trail, Part 20


Delfshaven, where the Pilgrim Fathers left Holland for the New World

After a year in Amsterdam, and eleven years in Leiden, the exiled Separatists decided to move to the New World.  In the Netherlands they were facing an imminent war with Spain, and they did not approve of the liberal Dutch culture.  They made an agreement with Merchant Adventurers in London to finance their voyage.  The Separatists traveled by boat from Leiden to Delfshaven where they gathered with friends and family to say goodbye before boarding the Speedwell on 22 July 1620.  They joined the Mayflower in Southampton and started out to cross the Atlantic for Virginia.

When the Leiden congregation was in Delfshaven, they gathered at the Old Church.  This building was built in 1417 as St. Anthony Chapel, Anthoniuskapel, but after the Reformation it was a protestant church, Hervormde Gemeente Delfshaven.  Today it is known as the Pilgrim Fathers Church.  There are many displays and objects in the museum inside.

Pilgrim Fathers Church


"In 1608, a hundred English Puritans fled to the tolerant Netherlands to practice their strict religion.  They were welcomed in Leiden, where after nearly twelve years they decided to emigrate to the New World.  On July 22, 1620, "The Pilgrim Fathers" prayed together on the quays of Delfshaven for the last time, before half of them boarded the Speedwell for the New World.  But the Speedwell proved to be unseaworthy.  Only the Mayflower, the ship that joined the emigration in England, was capable of the journey.  After months of hardship and many deaths, they founded their colony in Plymouth, Massachusetts, where they managed to survive with the help of the Native Americans.  William Bradford was the leader of the colony for a good thirty years and decided to celebrate their first harvest with the Native American people.  This tradition is still celebrated as the holiday known as Thanksgiving."





A stained glass window inside the church
commemorating The Speedwell ship




What happened after the Separatists left Holland and joined the Merchant Adventurers' ship the Mayflower at Southampton? Stay tuned to this blog for the next post.


The Pilgrim Fathers Church, Delfshaven website (in English):
http://www.oudeofpelgrimvaderskerk.nl/en/   

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Part 1 of this series "Babworth, Nottinghamshire":

Part 2 of this series "Scrooby Manor"

Part 3 of this series “Gainsborough, Lincolnshire”:

Part 4 of this series "Harwich, Essex, home of the Mayflower"

Part 5 this series "Stephen Hopkins of Upper Clatford, Hampshire"

Part 6 of this series "William Mullins of Dorking, Surrey"

Part 7 of this series “Edward Winslow of Droitwich, Worcestershire”

Part 8 of this series "The Fullers of Reddenhall, Norfolk":

Part 9 of this series "John Howland of Fenstanton, Cambridgeshire":

Part 10 of this series "Tilley and Sampson of Henlow, Bedfordshire":

Part 11 of this series "William Bradford of Austerfield, Yorkshire":

Part 12 of this series "Francis Eaton of Bristol":

Part 13 of this series "James Chilton, Robert Cushman of Canterbury, Kent, England":

Part 14 of this series "Fishtoft, Lincolnshire where the Pilgrims were betrayed":

Part 15 of this series "Boston, Lincolnshire, where the Pilgrims were jailed":

Part 16 of this series "Immingham, Lincolnshire to Holland":

Part 17 of this series “In Exile in Amsterdam”:

Part 18 of this series “St. Pieterskerk in Leiden, The Netherlands”:

Part 19 of this series "Touring Leiden":


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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Along the Pilgrim Trail ~ The Speedwell leaves the port of Delfshaven to join The Mayflower", Nutfield Genealogy, posted December 8, 2017, (  https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/12/along-pilgrim-trail-speedwell-leaves.html: accessed [access date]). 

Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Weathervane Wednesday ~ Above an ancient church in Reddenhall, Norfolk, England

 I post another in a series of weather vane photographs every Wednesday.  This started with images of weathervanes from the Londonderry, New Hampshire area, but now I've found interesting weather vanes all across New England and across the globe.  Sometimes my weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are interesting.  Often my readers tip me off to some very unique or unusual weathervanes, too!  If you know a great weather vane near you, let me know if you'd like to have it featured on this blog.

Today's weather vane was photographed in England, with ties to New England history.

Do you know the location of weathervane post #340?  Scroll down to find the answer.




The St. Mary's church in Reddenhall, Norfolk, England has a bell tower with four small turrets, each with a gilded weathervane.  The four weathervanes are all split tail banners, known in the United States as "long john" banners because they look like a pair of long underwear in the wind.

The banner weathervanes are some of the oldest styles of weathervanes not just because they are very simple, but because they were fashioned to look like a banner or flag flying from a castle tower or steeple.  They originated in the middle ages.

The St. Mary's  or Church of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary  in Reddenhall was the parish church of the FULLER family of the Mayflower.  There has been a church here for about 1000 years, and the oldest part of the current church building dates from the 1300s.  The bell tower, where the four weathervanes are located, was begun in 1460 and finished after 1515.  I don't know if the weather vanes are original to the tower.




Click here to see the entire collection of Weathervane Wednesday posts!

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~ Above an ancient church in Reddenhall, Norfolk, England", Nutfield Genealogy, posted December 6, 2017, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/12/weathervane-wednesday-above-ancient.html: accessed [access date]).

Tuesday, December 5, 2017

Tombstone Tuesday ~ A Very Odd Symbol on a Tombstone in Reddenhall, England

This tombstone was photographed at the churchyard of St. Mary's in Reddenhall, Norfolk, England while we were on the General Society of Mayflower Descendants Historic Sites Tour.  The FULLER family from the Mayflower attended church here.


IN LOVING MEMORY OF
ELLEN
THE WIFE OF
JOHN JORDAN
WHO DIED APRIL 4TH 1900
AGED 91 YEARS


This strange symbol puzzled me.
Is it a dollar sign?  With three lines?
A strange secret organization?

Of course, the truth behind this interesting symbol is very ordinary.  It is just the letters I, H and S on top of each other, sometimes called a christogram.  The Greek letters Iota, Eta and Sigma are the three letter of the name of "Jesus".  The Roman version is the letters IHC.   Another christogram is the chi-rho which are the letters x (chi) and p (rho) on top of each other from the Greek for "Christ". 

See the Wikipedia article for Christogram

Have you seen this particular christogram on a tombstone?  The one that looks like a dollar sign with three lines?

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday ~  A Very Odd Symbol on a Tombstone in Reddenhall, England", Nutfield Genealogy, posted December 5, 2017, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/12/tombstone-tuesday-very-odd-symbol-on.html: accessed [access date]).

Monday, December 4, 2017

Along the Pilgrim Trail ~ Touring Leiden in The Netherlands

Leiden, The Netherlands

Along the Pilgrim Trail, part 19

Vincent and I recently took the General Society of Mayflower Descendants Historic Sites Tour of England, Wales and The Netherlands along with 41 other enthusiast participants (known as "The 43").  We traced the footsteps of the Separatists and the Mayflower passengers and crew all around these countries with some amazing tour directors, guides, historians and authors.  We were given access to places off the usual tourist trails, and behind the scenes.  We had a wonderful time, and I will be blogging more about this tour this month.

In my last blog post I described how the first places we visited in Leiden were St. Pieterskerk and Rev. John Robinson's home across the street.  Our tour group then walked around the corner to see the alley where William Brewster lived and had his printing press.  

SITE OF THE VICUS CHORALI (OR PILGRIM) PRESS, ON PIETERSKERKKOORSTEEG
(ST. PETER'S CHURCH, CHOIR ALLEY) LEIDEN, NETHERLANDS, IN THE (1609 - 1620)
HOME OF THE SEPARATIST PILGRIM FATHER, ELDER WILLIAM BREWSTER OF SCROOBY,
NOTTINGHAMSHIRE, ENGLAND, THE SPIRITUAL LEADER OF PLYMOUTH IN NEW ENGLAND
UNTIL HIS DEATH IN 1643 - 44.

THE GENERAL SOCIETY OF MAYFLOWER DESCENDANTS (USA 1897)
WALDO MORGAN ALLEN, GOVERNOR GENERAL
ON THEIR FIRST PILGRIMAGE 152 BY PLANES - TO THE NETHERLANDS AND ENGLAND
SEPTEMBER 22 - OCTOBER 6, 1955
335 YEARS AFTER THE SAILING OF THE MAYFLOWER


This little alley was renamed for William Brewster
Brewster descendants touching the wall of Brewster's house

Just a few blocks away was the little side street where the English Separatist James Chilton was stoned with a cobblestone during a religious riot on 28 April 1615.  There are existing records that show his daughter sought medical treatment for him due to his head injury after the attack.



Around the corner is the Leiden city hall, Staduis, where some of the Separatists had civil weddings recorded.  The Dutch custom of civil weddings was brought to New England by the English Pilgrim Separatists.  This building dates from the sixteenth century.



And within eyesight of the St. Catherine's hospital where Myles Standish was treated in 1601, as a British soldier during the war with Spain.  He was still living in Leiden when he was hired by the Separatists to act as their military advisor in 1620.  The chapel of this hospital is known as the protestant Waalse Kerk (Waloon Church).

St. Catherine's Hospital
WAALSE KERK
Originally a hospital chapel from the 13th
century.  After the Reformation used by the
French Church in the Netherlands

We then visited Jeremy Bangs' American Pilgrim Museum. This is a tiny place, so our group was divided into two sections, and then each section was divided in half so that one small group could gather in one room, and the other half of the group in the other.  This small two room museum is well worth visiting if you are ever in Leiden.  See the website:   http://www.leidenamericanpilgrimmuseum.org/index.htm



We were encouraged to ask questions, sit on the furniture,
and touch the books!  Quite an experience for descendants!





The tour ended here in Leiden on October 1st, but we lingered here to visit with some Hoogerzeil cousins until October 3rd.   In Leiden, the third of October is the day they celebrate liberation from a siege with Spain in 1574.  This celebration is a harvest festival that may have inspired the Separatists to celebrate Thanksgiving when they became known as "The Pilgrim Fathers" and settled in the New World. It is a very big party, and we got out of town just in time!

When the English Separatists left Leiden to go to Delfshaven to board the ship The Speedwell to join up with the ship The Mayflower, they left from this spot on this little canal in Leiden.  It is marked with a large memorial plaque listing the family names.  Many of these are not names related to the Mayflower, but some families came later.  Tomorrow I will blog about Delftshaven.  Stay tuned!


ALLERTON - ALSTON - BARKER
BARLOW - BASSETT - BLOSSOM
BOMPASS - BRADFORD
BREWSTER - BROWNE- CAREY
CARPENTER - CARVER - CHANDLER
CHILTON - COOKE - COOPER
CROCKSTON - CUSHMAN
CUTHBERTSON - DE LANNOY
DUNHAM - ENGLISH - FLETCHER
FULLER - GOODALE - GOODMAN
HANSON - HEALE - HOOKE
JENNEY - LEE - MAHIEU
MASTERSON - MINTER - MITCHELL
MORTON - NICHOLAS - NORRIS
PONTUS - PRIEST - RING
ROBINSON - ROGERS - SAMSON
SOUTHWORTH - STANDISH
SYMONSON - TILLIE - TINKER
TRACEY - TURNER - WHITE
WILLETT - WILLIAMS - WINSLOW
WOOD- WRIGHT

Vanaf hier vertrokken de Pilgrims uit
Leiden op weg naar de nieuwe wereld
1620 - 1647
From here the Pilgrims left Leiden
on their Journey to the new world
PA



Part 1 of this series "Babworth, Nottinghamshire":

Part 2 of this series "Scrooby Manor"

Part 3 of this series “Gainsborough, Lincolnshire”:

Part 4 of this series "Harwich, Essex, home of the Mayflower"

Part 5 this series "Stephen Hopkins of Upper Clatford, Hampshire"

Part 6 of this series "William Mullins of Dorking, Surrey"

Part 7 of this series “Edward Winslow of Droitwich, Worcestershire”

Part 8 of this series "The Fullers of Reddenhall, Norfolk":

Part 9 of this series "John Howland of Fenstanton, Cambridgeshire":

Part 10 of this series "Tilley and Sampson of Henlow, Bedfordshire":

Part 11 of this series "William Bradford of Austerfield, Yorkshire":

Part 12 of this series "Francis Eaton of Bristol":

Part 13 of this series "James Chilton, Robert Cushman of Canterbury, Kent, England":

Part 14 of this series "Fishtoft, Lincolnshire where the Pilgrims were betrayed":

Part 15 of this series "Boston, Lincolnshire, where the Pilgrims were jailed":

Part 16 of this series "Immingham, Lincolnshire to Holland":

Part 17 of this series “In Exile in Amsterdam”:

Part 18 of this series “St. Pieterskerk in Leiden, The Netherlands”:


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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Along the Pilgrim Trail ~ Touring Leiden in The Netherlands”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted December 4, 2017, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/12/along-pilgrim-trail-touring-leiden-in.html: accessed [access date]). 

Saturday, December 2, 2017

Surname Saturday ~ GUPPY of Salem, Massachusetts


GUPPY  / GUPPI / GUPPE / GUPPIE /  GUPPEY

Reuben Guppy (about 1601 – about 1684), my 10th great grandfather, was first recorded in the New World in Ipswich, Massachusetts in 1641.  That same year he was recorded in Salem, too.  In 1641 he was also in court “for running away to the eastward from his wife, who was about to be confined in childbirth and for stealing, blasphemy, lying and swearing”.   He was sentenced to be whipped. 

See this letter in the John Winthrop Papers, Vol. 1 -5, 1557 - 1649 database at www.americanancestors.org, Winthrop Papers, volume 4, pages 323 – 324.

"Thomas Gorges and Edward Godfrey to John Winthrop
To the Right Wor[shipfu]ll John Withrope Esqr. these present speed in Boston
Aggamenticus 1 March 1640/1
Most honoured Sir, one Reuben Guppy of late comminge into our plantation and pretendinge much Religeon and great zeal for the Ordinances of God was entertained by a planter, but since ther haue come diuers reports unto vs of his misdeameanors with you, and that fear of punishment doue him away, and likewise this day I haue reccaued a letter from Captain Vnderhill which expresseth the desier of Mr. Endicott to haue him returned which letter I haue sent you heerinclosd.  the desier we haue to satisfy his request, and to ridd such fellows out of our Prouince, which haue brought such a scandall on it haue caused vs to omitt noe opportunity of sendinge him, therfore by Sampson Salter, M[aste]r of the Makeshift you shall receaue him. resolued we are that this Prouince shall be noe refuge for Runnaways, for none comminge from another Plantation shall be entertained heer without a Certificate of good demeanour, or vppon the knowledge of some of the Inhabitants.  thus with our seruices tendered to you; commendinge you to the protection of the Almighty we Rest Yourse in all due respects
THO: GORGES
EDW: GODFREY”

Reuben Guppy is a terrific Black Sheep ancestor, who was in and out of court records for the rest of his life.  He left a lot of records for theft, lawsuits, dodging rent, and for turning in his neighbors for various crimes.  My favorite was a record by Sargeant Dixie who had seen Guppy stuff a hen in his breeches. [Essex Antiquarian, Volume 3 (1899), page 191 from Salem Quarterly Court Records, dated 30: 1: 1641] In another interesting case in 1657 he accused his neighbor Richard Pitfold of bestiality. [Essex Antiquarian, Volume 11 (1907), page 135]  However, the origins of Reuben Guppy are still unknown, and his exact birth and death dates are still undiscovered.

By 1650 he owned a lot of land which he deeded to his son John in 1681. This land was left to the granddaughter, Bethia Guppy who married Thomas Marston.  The land left the family when it was sold to Mr. and Mrs. Marston, of Boston, in 1769 for three pounds, six shillings and eight pence [Essex Register of Deeds, Book 125, leaf 278].

In 1648 Reuben Guppy was in Agamenticus again (now York, Maine) where he was found to be estranged from his wife and brought back to Salem, Massachusetts by the authorities.  That same year the court ordered “That the 2 eldest children of Reuben Guppy be placed out, the boy till the age of 21 years and the mayde till the age of 18 years.”  The girl was probably my 9th great grandmother, Mary Guppy, who was placed with the Verin family, and then with the John Porter, Sr. family.  Mary Guppy married John Glover in 1661.

The Guppy family was involved in a famous 1684 robbery of 500 pounds known as “The Corwin Robbery” [History of Salem, by Sidney Perley, Volume III, pages 184 – 188].  Reuben Guppy, his son John Guppy, and Abigail (wife of son John) were all accused. John, a former servant in the home of George Corwin, and several other former servants, an African slave named David, and several neighbors, plotted to steal the money.  John Guppy was named as an accessory to the crime. Two others, William Godsoe and his wife, were sentenced to be branded with the letter B in the forehead. Thomas Gatchell, Nathaniel Pickman and John Collier were sentenced to pay treble damages, be severely whipped 39 stripes or pay ten pounds (I wonder which one they chose?)  According to History of Salem,  page 187“The branding was done by constable Flinder, for which he was paid two pounds. The Godsoes disappeared from Salem”. 

Reuben Guppy was still living in 1684.  He had deposed in court in 1665 that he was 60 years old, which would place his birth at about 1605.

Some GUPPY resources:

The History of Salem, by Sidney Perley
The Genealogical Dictionary of New England by James Savage, 1969, Volume II, page 324

My GUPPY lineage:

Generation 1:  Reuben Guppy, born about 1601 probably in England, died after 1684 in Salem, Massachusetts; married Eleanor or Ellen.  Four children.

Generation 2:  Mary Guppy, born about 1640; married 2 January 1661 in Salem to John Glover, son of Charles Glover and Elizabeth Unknown.  He was born about 1638 in Salem, and died May 1695 in Marblehead, Massachusetts. Eight children.

Generation 3:  Jonathan Glover m. Abigail Henderson
Generation 4:  Jonathan Glover m. Tabitha Bacon
Generation 5: Daniel Glover m. Hannah Jillings
Generation 6: Tabitha Glover m. Thomas Homan
Generation 7: Betsey Jillings Glover m. Jabez Treadwell
Generation 8: Eliza Ann Treadwell m. Abijah Hitchings
Generation 9:  Abijah Franklin Hitchings m. Hannah Eliza Lewis
Generation 10: Arthur Treadwell Hitchings m. Florence Etta Hoogerzeil
Generation 11: Gertrude Matilda Hitchings m. Stanley Elmer Allen

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, “Surname Saturday ~ GUPPY of Marblehead”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted December 2, 2017, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/12/surname-saturday-guppy-of-salem.html: accessed [access date]). 

Thursday, November 30, 2017

December 2017 Genealogy and Local History Calendar


Genealogy Events Calendar

For last minute updates, see the "Nutfield Genealogy" Facebook page at this link:
https://www.facebook.com/nutfield.gen

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November 30, Thursday, 6:30 – 8pm, Genealogy Research at the New Hampshire Historical Society, at the Wolfeboro Public Library, 259 S. Main Street, Wolfeboro, New Hampshire, sponsored by the Lakes Region Genealogy Interest Group.  Presented by NH Historical Society’s Library Director Sarah Galligan.  Free to the public.
November 30, Thursday, 6pm, Revolution Song: A Story of American Freedom, at the Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Presented by author Russell Shorto.  $10 per person, register online at www.masshist.org/events 

November 30, Thursday, 6- 8pm, Marlborough Genealogy Workshop, at the Peter Rice Homestead, 377 Elm Street, Marlborough, Massachusetts.  Use the archives, discuss your research, share ideas with others. Free wifi, bring your devices. 

December 1, Friday, noon – 1pm, New England’s Hidden Histories:  The Race to Rescue our Earliest Manuscript Church Records, at the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Presented by Dr. James F. Cooper of the Congregational Library.  Free to the public. 

December 1, Friday, 5pm – 8pm, Dulcimers in the Parlor – A Candlelight Event, at the John Woodcock Garrison, 362 North Washington Street, North Attleboro, Massachusetts.  The historic garrison and grounds will be festooned with holiday greenery, while three dulcimers play in the parlor.  Light refreshments will be served. $5 adults, $3 children under 14.

December 1, Friday, 5 – 8pm, Home for the Holidays, at the Sarah Orne Jewett House Museum and Visitor Center, 5 Portland Street, South Berwick, Maine.  An open house with hot cider, handcrafted holiday gifts, make your own ornament and tours of the Sarah Orne Jewett House Museum.  Free to the public.

December 2, Saturday, 9:30 – noon, Irish Study Group , at the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Free to the public.  Everyone is welcome to stay and use the library afterwards. Contact Mary Ellen Grogan at megrogan@ix.netcom.com for more information.

December 2, Saturday, 2pm, Sugar and Spice: Gingerbread History, at the Metropolitan Water Works Museum, 2450 Beacon Street, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts.  Presented by Clara Silverstein of Historic Newton.  View a magical display of gingerbread houses, hear a talk about the history of ginger, and kids are welcome to try decorating a cookie. 

December 2, Saturday, New Visitor Tour of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 99 -101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Free to the public.  You don’t need to be a member.  Tour attendees are welcome to use our library after the tour. No registration necessary.

December 2, Saturday, 10am – 1pm,  American Girl Doll Tea Party, at the Millyard Museum, 200 Bedford Street, Manchester, New Hampshire.  $10 per person, includes a tour of the museum, lunch, and a craft.  Bring your doll and join us for a historical tea party!  Space is limited; please call for a reservation at 603-622-7531.  Children must be accompanied by an adult.

December 2, Saturday, 2pm – 4pm, Book Signing with Robert Perreault, at the Millyard Museum, 200 Bedford Street, Manchester, New Hampshire.  Free to the public.  A short talk by the author of Images of Modern America: Manchester with photographs taken between 1971 and 2005 of the city of Manchester.  The book is for sale in the museum shop for $22.99.  

December 5, Tuesday, 6pm, Christmas Traditions in Boston with Anthony Sammarco, at the Boston Public Library, in the Commonwealth Salon, 700 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Free to the public.  A lecture by author Anthony Sammarco.  His book will be for sale at the talk.

December 5, Tuesday, 6pm – 9pm, “The Hands-On History Workshop: Ghost of Christmas Present: The Transformation of Christmas in America” by Guest Scholar Stephen Nissenbaum, at the American Antiquarian Society, 185 Salisbury Street, Worcester, Massachusetts.   Participants will explore the AAS collections which are rich with material for Christmas – books, children’s literature, manuscripts, letters, periodicals, sermons, music and a wide variety of ephemera.  $30 per person with a light dinner.  Please register at:  http://www.americanantiquarian.org/hands-history

December 6, Wednesday, 6pm – 7:30pm, “The Hero of Dear Old Halifax”: The Massachusetts Relief Effort Following the Halifax Explosion of 1917, at the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts.   Free to the Public.  Register here please:  https://shop.americanancestors.org/products/hero-of-dear-old-halifax

December 6, Wednesday, 5pm, Boston in a Jar:  Marshmallow Fluff and Boston’s Candy Industry, at the Boston Public Library, in the Commonwealth Salon, 700 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Presented by Mimi Graney. Free to the public.

December 6, Wednesday, 7pm, Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry with David Dearborn, at Memorial Hall Library, 97 Main Street, Andover, Massachusetts.  Led by NEHGS retired Senior Genealogist David Dearborn.  Free to the public.

December 7, Thursday, 6pm – 8pm, The Old Colony History Museum After Hours – Gingerbread Jubilee, at the Old Colony History Museum, 66 Church Street, Taunton, Massachusetts.  Decorate a few gingerbread houses, drink some holiday cheer, wear your ugly holiday sweater, and meetup with other young professionals (21 and older) for an evening of cocktails and holiday fun. 

December 7, Thursday, 6:30pm, Who is American?  Chinese Exclusion, Japanese Internment & Today, at the Old South Meeting House, 310 Washington Street, Boston, Massachusetts. Hosted by the Chinese Historical Society of New England, the New England Japanese Citizens League, and the Boston Asian Film Festival.  Free but tickets are required at this link: https://osmhdec7-17.brownpapertickets.com/ 

December 8, Friday, noon – 3pm, Christmas at the Nickels-Sortwell House, 121 Main Street, Wiscassett, Maine.  $5 members of Historic New England, $10 non-members.  Experience a nineteenth century Christmas.  Tour rooms in this historic home decorated by the Garden Club of Wiscasett, and the barn exhibit of wreaths decorated by local businesses.

December 8, Friday, 7:30pm, What did You Miss: Deep Diving into your Research with Dave Robison, at Brandeis University, Mandel Center for the Humanities, Room G3.  Sponsored by TIARA (The Irish Ancestral Research Association), Inc.  Presented by Dave Robison, professional genealogist.  

December 9, Saturday 1:30pm,  Documentation Without Tears, at the Goodnow Library, 21 Concord Road, Sudbury, Massachusetts.  Sponsored by the Middlesex County  Chapter of the Massachusetts Society of Genealogists.  Presented by Denise Picard Lindgren. Free to the public. 

December 9, Saturday, 9:30am - 10:30pm, Fireside Chats and Open House at the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 99 - 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts. FREE to the public. Hear from our family history experts during the day on topics such as Irish research, Puritan pedigrees, DNA and the Mayflower.  Complimentary hot drinks and sweet snacks.  Special "in store only" pricing on charts, books and gifts!  9:30 Irish research 11:30 Puritan Pedigrees, 1:30 Early Vermont  3:30 Mayflower and DNA. 

December 9, Saturday,10:30 am,  Family Stories: How and Why to Remember and Tell Them, at the Hooksett Public Library, Village Depot Room, 31 St. Mary’s Way, Hooksett, New Hampshire. Hosted by the White Mountain Woolen Magic Rug Hooking Guild.  This is an interactive program by storyteller Jo Radner, who will share her foolproof ways to mine memories and interview relatives for meaningful stories. Free to the public.

December 9, Saturday, 7pm, Harnessing History:  On the Trail of New Hampshire's State Dog, the Chinook, at the Madbury Town Hall, 13 Town Hall Road, Madbury, New Hampshire.  Bob Cottrell will discuss the history of Arthur Walden and his Chinooks.  Snow date of January 10th.  Sponsored by the Madbury Historical Society.  Free to the public. 

December 11, Monday, 6:30pm, Songs of the Season: Explore the Massachusetts Connection to Some Festive Favorites, at the Langley Adams Library, 185 Main Street, Groveland, Massachusetts.  Lauren Towler will presnt the origins of several seasonal songs that have a Massachusetts connection.  Free to the public.

December 12, Tuesday, 6pm – 8pm, The Spirit of Christmas Past: Four centuries of Christmas in New England, at the Eustis Estate, 1424 Canton Avenue, Milton, Massachusetts.  An illustrated lecture of the development of the celebration of Christmas from when it was outlawed in 17th century New England up until the 20th century.  $10 members of Historic New England, $15 non-members.  Refreshments to be served following the presentation.

December 13, Wednesday, 6pm, The Slave’s Cause, at the Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Presented by Manisha Sinha of the University of Connecticut.  $10 per person.  Register online at www.masshist.org/events  


December 16, Saturday, The 243rd Anniversary Boston Tea Party Reenactment, at the Old South Meeting House, 310 Washington Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Witness the debate over the tea tax, then join the procession to Griffin’s Wharf and witness the destruction of the tea by the Sons of Liberty.  Fee for the meeting inside the Meeting house. 

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "December 2017 Genealogy and Local History Calendar", Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 30, 2017, (  https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/11/december-2017-genealogy-and-local.html: accessed [access date]).

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Weathervane Wednesday ~ An Ancestral Church Found by Accident

I post another in a series of weather vane photographs every Wednesday.  This started with images of weathervanes from the Londonderry, New Hampshire area, but now I've found interesting weather vanes all across New England and across the globe.  Sometimes my weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are interesting.  Often my readers tip me off to some very unique or unusual weathervanes, too!  If you know a great weather vane near you, let me know if you'd like to have it featured on this blog.

Today's weather vane was photographed in England.


Do you know the location of weathervane post #332?  Scroll down to find the answer.






This gilded weathercock is on top of the steeple of St. Martin's church in Dorking, Surrey, England.  We photographed it while stopping in Dorking with the Mayflower Historic Sites Tour a few weeks ago, to see the home of William Mullins, a Mayflower passenger.  I remembered that I had several ancestors who lived and were married in Dorking at St. Martin's, and we saw the church near the Mullins home.

The weathercock is an ancient Christian symbol, and can be seen on many churches in Europe, and in early colonial era churches in the United States. This church dates from the 1100s, and replaced an older building. The 210 foot spire was added in the 1870s, so the weathercock may not be as old as the rest of the building.  In the photograph we noticed a ladder up to the weathervane, so it might be undergoing repairs or gilding this year. It is a three dimensional weathercock, with spread wings. 

My 9th great grandparents, Roger Bassett and Ann Holland were married here at St. Martin's church in Dorking on 27 April 1623.  My 8th great grandfather, William Bassett was baptized here on 30 May 1624, and he came to the New World at age 11 in 1635, with his mother and stepfather, Hugh Burt, who settled in Lynn, Massachusetts.  

Click here for my BASSETT surname blog post:
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2015/05/surname-saturday-bassett-of-lynn.html  


The St. Martin's, Dorking website:
http://www.stmartinsdorking.org/welcome-to-our-church/index.html  

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~  An Ancestral Church Found by Accident", Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 29, 2017, ( 
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/11/weathervane-wednesday-ancestral-church_29.html: accessed [access date]).