Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Weathervane Wednesday ~ Above a Former Elementary School

This is the 5th Anniversary of Weathervane Wednesday!  I've posted 256 different blog posts about historic and interesting weathervanes over the past five years.

I post a series of weather vane photographs every Wednesday.  This started with images of weathervanes from the Londonderry, New Hampshire area, but now I've found interesting weather vanes all across New Hampshire, New England and across the globe.  Sometimes my weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are interesting.  Often my readers tip me off to some very unique or unusual weathervanes, too!  If you know a great weather vane near you, let me know if you'd like to have it featured on this blog.

Today's weather vane was photographed in New Hampshire.

Do you know the location of weathervane post #273?  Scroll down to find the answer.




Today's weathervane was photographed above the former Ash Street School, on the corner of Bridge Street.  This building is now the digital marketing company SilverTech, Inc.  This school was built in 1874 with eight classrooms.  Because of the shape of the building each classroom has windows on three sides, and its design won a gold medal in 1876 at the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition.  This building was used as the Manchester school administration office until 2005, when it was bought and renovated by SilverTech in 2007.

The weathervane on the clock tower is a filigree arrow. This type of fancy cutwork in weathervanes was popular during the Victorian age when this school was built.  Both the arrow vane and the cardinal numbers are decorated with cut scroll work, which was made easier by newly developed machinery in the late 1800s.

In 1993 the clock tower was renovated, too, and the clockwork and all four wooden clock dials were completely restored.  It is still mechanically wound twice a week.  The clockworks inside are an 1874 Howard.  The wooden dials are finished with 23k gold leaf.  I couldn't find any information on the weathervane, nor if it was restored at the same as the clock tower.  It looks pretty spiffy with a zoom lens or binoculars!

A postcard of the Ash Street School
from the Manchester Historic Association website
catalog number 2012.514.019


The website for SilverTech in Manchester, NH  http://www.silvertech.com/

Click here to see the entire series of Weathervane Wednesday posts!

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Published under a Creative Commons License

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~ Above a Former Elementary School", Nutfield Genealogy, posted August 24, 2016,  (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/08/weathervane-wednesday-above-former.html: accessed [access date]).

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Halbert Morrison, age 2, Derry, New Hampshire

This tombstone is located at the Forest Hill Cemetery in Derry, New Hampshire


The infant's tiny tombstone is located next to his parent's graves


HALBERT
Son of John
Morrison Jr. &
Sally his wife,
died Jan. 10, 1831
AEt. 2 yrs 7 mo.
Here Halbert lies and peaceful is his
                                                rest,
No sorrows now invade his youthful
                                               breast
May guardian angels watch his
                                           little nest


According to The History of the Morison or Morrison Family, by Leonard Allison Morrison,  1880, page 225.

1946 “Dea. Halbert (John1) was born in Ireland in 1685, and died in Londonderry, N.H., June 6, 1755.  He lies buried in that beautiful cemetery, so elevated as to overlook a large extent of territory, and situated near Derry East Meeting-House.”  This was the spot the first settlers of Londonderry chose for their “long, last rest”; and there, in the peaceful blossom of mother-earth, many of them rest, in that sleep which shall be unbroken till the reveille call of the final morning.

Deacon Morison evidently emigrated to this country in 1718 with his brothers James and John, and the early Londonderry settlers, though he does not appear in Londonderry till 1735…  when he appeared upon the scene in Londonderry, and bought 122 acres of land, for “200 pounds”, of John and Christian McNeal.  His name occasionally appears on the records of Londonderry…  It is stated that he was married three times.  His last wife’s name is reported to be Jean Steele.  She died Oct. 19, 1753, aged 53 years.  He died June 6, 1755, aged 70 years… and side by side they rest together…”

Page 230
2003 “John4 (David3, Dea. Halbert2, John1) lived on the farm in Derry, N.H. his grandfather bought in 1735… Late in life he married Sarah, daughter of William Davidson, of Derry, N.H. He was respected by all; he died March 13, 1851, aged 85 yrs; she died Feb. 8, 1873, aged 69 yrs.  Soon after his death, the farm passed out of the possession of the Morrisons.
One child.
2004.  Halbert; d. Jan. 10, 1831, aged 2 yrs. 7 mos.” 

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Published under a Creative Commons License

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday ~ Halbert Morrison, age 2, Derry, New Hampshire", Nutfield Genealogy, posted August 23, 2016,  (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/08/tombstone-tuesday-halbert-morrison-age.html: accessed [access date]).  

Saturday, August 20, 2016

Surname Saturday ~ SAWTELL of Watertown and Groton, Massachusetts


SAWTELL  SARTELL  SATELLE  SATELL  SATLE

There are several good sources of information on the SATELL family of New England.  The first is an article in the NEHGS Register “Richard Sawtell of Watertown, MA”, Volume 126 (1972), pages 3 – 17. One of the authors of this early article was John Brooks Threlfall who wrote a book Fifty Great Migration Colonists to New England and Their Origins in 2008 which updated a lot of the information on the SATELL family. 

Richard Sawtell, my 10th great grandfather, was baptized on April 7, 1611 at Aller, Somerset, England, the son of John Sawtell and Agnes Pittard.  There are many records in Somersetshire of the SAWTELL family.

The first record of Richard Sawtell in New England was on July 25, 1636 on the list of proprietors of Watertown, Massachusetts when he received Lot 8 in the 4th division as a single man.  His brother, Thomas Sawtell, was made a freeman in Boston in 1649, where he died childless in 1651 and named his brother Richard and a sister Ann Kendrick of Muddy River (Suffolk County Probate #111).

Richard Sawtell removed from Watertown to the new settlement of Groton in 1655, where he again received a large grant of land as one of the first, original proprietors.  He was made the first town clerk, and the records show that he was highly educated.  Richard’s homestead was one of five garrison houses in Groton.   There were several raids and massacres in Groton during King Philip’s War, so the family removed back to Watertown.   Two of his sons went back to resettle the town of Groton.  He was chosen to be a selectman in Watertown in 1689.

Richard Sawtell adopted the illegitimate son of Zechariah Smith in 1670.  In 1672 he sued Thomas, John and Joseph Smith for the child’s estate.  They were charged with illegally administering the estate.

In his will, dated May 16, 1692, Richard Sawtell left his lands in Groton and Watertown to his wife, with instructions to his son Obadiah to work the land in Groton, and instructions to his son Enoch to work the land in Watertown. 
Richard Sawtell is the ancestor of presidents Herbert Hoover and Richard Nixon.

My SATELL genealogy:

Generation 1:  Richard Sawtell,  son of John Sawtell and Agnes Pittard, was baptized on 4 April 1611 in Aller, Somersetshire, England, died on 21 August 1694 in Watertown, Massachusetts; married first on 5 February 1627 in High Ham, Somersetshire to Elizabeth Pople, daughter of William Pople.  Married second in 1637 to Elizabeth Waite, daughter of Phineas Waite and Mary Hubbard.  Eleven children with Elizabeth Waite, all born in Watertown.

Generation 2:  Hannah Satell, born on 10 December 1642 in Watertown, died 18 February  1723 in Woburn, Massachusetts; married on 13 July 1665 in Woburn to Increase Winn, son of Edward Winn and Joanna Unknown.  He was born 5 December 1641 in Woburn and died 14 December 1690 in Woburn.  Nine children.

Generation 3: Mary Winn m. Nathaniel Wyman
Generation 4: Increase Wyman m. Deborah Pierce
Generation 5: Increase Wyman m. Catherine Unknown
Generation 6: Jemima Wyman m. Colonel Joshua Burnham
Generation 7: Jemima Burnham m. Romanus Emerson
Generation 8: George Emerson m. Mary Esther Younger
Generation 9: Mary Katharine Emerson m. George E. Batchelder
Generation 10: Carrie Maude Batchelder m. Joseph Elmer Allen
Generation 11: Stanley Elmer Allen m. Gertrude Matilda Hitchings (my grandparents)

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Published under a Creative Commons License

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Surname Saturday ~ SAWTELL of Watertown and Groton, Massachusetts", Nutfield Genealogy, posted August 20, 2016, (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/08/surname-saturday-sawtell-of-watertown.html:  accessed [access date]). 

Thursday, August 18, 2016

A New Hampshire Yankee in New York City - searching for family landmarks

In which we explore three boroughs of New York City (Brooklyn, Queens, and Manhattan) searching for landmarks like home addresses, schools, churches and places of employment...


Last weekend we did a whirlwind weekend trip to New York City to see where my husband grew up.  We brought my mother-in-law from Spain, so she could see all the places we only knew from stories and photographs.  It was a fun trip, and we covered a lot of miles in two days.  If you take a similar trip to New York City, a GPS and Google maps with street view is very important!

214 Montrose Ave, Brooklyn, NY
My husband was born in Manhattan while his father was working at the United Nations headquarters in New York City.  This is a prestigious address for employment, but their places of residence were much more modest.  At the time he was born, my husband lived at 214 Montrose Avenue in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn.  This was a two story apartment building where he grew up in the 1960s.

Montrose Avenue Subway Station

The two story original building was gone, and was replaced by this four story apartment building.  Most of the neighborhood was the same, including a laundromat across the street and the subway station on the corner.  One block down the street at 138 Montrose Avenue is the Most Holy Trinity church, flanked by the parochial elementary school and convent.  Vincent attended this school until fifth grade.  Vincent's Mom is still friendly with neighbors she met in this neighborhood over 50 years ago.

Most Holy Trinity, Brooklyn, NY



Vincent had his baptism and made his first communion in the Most Holy Trinity church.  Unfortunately it was closed when we dropped by, but we were able to get a photo through the window.  It is a lovely old church built by German immigrants in 1841.  It was almost burned to the ground by Bill "The Butcher" Poole's gang of "Know Nothings" (anti immigrant gang) in the 1850s during a period of anti-Catholic sentiment.  Holy Trinity is still a thriving community today, although the school has been closed.

PS 175, Forest Hills, Queens, NY

Around 1970 Vincent's family moved from Brooklyn to the Forest Hills area of Queens.  He attended 5th grade at PS 175 on 64th Street near Yellowstone Boulevard, where their apartment was located.  This school is now called the Lynn Gross Discovery School.  On that August Saturday the playground was full of kids and parents - kids speaking dozens of languages. It was a great sight!

A typical apartment building on Yellowstone Blvd.

We couldn't find the exact address where they lived on Yellowstone Boulevard.  The entire street was lined with brick apartment buildings that all looked alike.  This is the one that Vincent and his mother think was their home (or one similar to it!).

Nearby Yellowstone Boulevard was the site of the 1964 World's Fair in Flushing Meadows.  This spot held a lot of memories for Vincent and his mother.  She still has a souvenir plate and photographs of the World's Fair.  We stopped first at the Queen's museum, which by the way, was the United Nations headquarters in the 1940s before the Manhattan headquarters compound was completed in 1952.  Serendipity!  Inside the museum is an exhibit of 1964 World's Fair memorabilia and the "Panorama of New York" which was one of the rides back in the day.  It is no longer a ride, but it is still a huge scale model of the entire five borough area.

1964 World's Fair, Spanish Pavilion
That's Vincent and his mother in the middle!



Unisphere, 1964 World's Fair, NYC

The Queen's Museum building

Right behind the Queen's Museum is the iconic Unisphere which is often featured in movies and on TV.   This was a great time for a photo of Vincent and his mother.  The observation towers, which used to house a restaurant on top, are still standing nearby.  Maria told me that they ate in that restaurant at least once.

1964 World's Fair streetlights at Canobie Lake Park, Salem, NH



[Serendipity!  Canobie Lake Park in Salem, New Hampshire has many of the World's Fair features near the park entrance including some futuristic looking street lights and trash cans.  Check them out the next time you are there.  We lived nearby in Londonderry for 33 years and didn't know about this bit of trivia!  Apparently many World's Fair features were auctioned off after the fair ended, and this is where some of those items ended up.]

United Nations Headquarters
Manhattan, New York
From Queens we traveled over the Hudson River to Manhattan to see the United Nations headquarters.  Unfortunately there are no guided tours of the General Assembly building on weekends, but we had a lot of fun walking around, eating lunch in the cafeteria, peeking in the bookstore and gift shop, and reminiscing.  Vincent's father was employed there during turbulent times in the 1960s and he witnessed Krushchev banging his shoe on the UN podium (a month before Vincent was born),  the Bay of Pigs incident, the Vietnam War, Civil Rights and other exciting history.

The new Freedom Tower in Lower Manhattan
see through the car roof window

After our walk around the UN, we drove the length of Manhattan down Fifth Avenue to see the new Freedom Tower and Battery Park.  We also drove up to Hastings on Hudson, where my mother-in-law used to work for a publisher named Morgan and Morgan in the 1960s.   This is a cute little village in Westchester County.  Maria used to take the train from Brooklyn, to Grand Central Station, and then all the way to Hastings on Hudson every day (19 miles north).  The little storefront that used to be the publishing office is now a driving school.  Morgan and Morgan published photography books, including books by Ansel Adams.  Maria remembers meeting Ansel Adams in the office in Hastings on Hudson!

The former offices of Morgan and Morgan Publishers


Maria at work at Morgan and Morgan
in the late 1960s

Although this is all recent family history, my husband and his mother had not been back to see all these locations since the 1970s.  It was fun to listen to them reminisce as we toured New York.  I hope you will take the time to bring your family back to see where you and your loved ones lived, worked, worshipped and went to school, too.

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For the truly curious:

PS 175 Lynn Gross Discovery School  http://schools.nyc.gov/SchoolPortals/28/Q175/default.htm

1964 World's Fair at Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1964_New_York_World%27s_Fair

The Queen's Museum
http://www.queensmuseum.org/  

A YouTube video of Most Holy Trinity Church at Christmas Time
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A6b6Ks8Cbbo

Most Holy Trinity Church, Brooklyn, Facebook Page
https://www.facebook.com/Roman-Catholic-Parish-of-Most-Holy-Trinity-St-Mary-28302113051/  

United Nations Visitor's Center
http://visit.un.org/


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Published under a Creative Commons License

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "A New Hampshire Yankee in New York City - searching for family landmarks", Nutfield Genealogy, posted August 18, 2016, (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/08/a-new-hampshire-yankee-in-new-york-city.html: accessed [access date]).

Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Weathervane Wednesday ~ Take Two! A Replacement Weathervane

It's Weathervane Wednesday!

I post a series of weather vane photographs every Wednesday.  This started with images of weathervanes from the Londonderry, New Hampshire area, but now I've found interesting weather vanes all across New England and across the globe.  Sometimes my weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are interesting.  Often my readers tip me off to some very unique or unusual weathervanes, too!  If you know a great weather vane near you, let me know if you'd like to have it featured on this blog.

Today's weather vane was photographed in New Hampshire.

Do you know the location of weathervane post #272?  Scroll down to find the answer.




In 2012 I published a "Weathervane Wednesday" of this weather vane, but it looked like this:



It appears that sometime in the last few years the Friendly's on South Willow Street in Manchester, New Hampshire replaced their old, familiar weather vane with the cursive letter "F" for a simple outline of an ice cream cone.  I don't want to appear cynical, but as a historian and as a genealogist who deals with handwriting, and a lot of old fashioned handwriting from generations past, is this due to the fact that handwriting is not taught in school anymore?   Don't children recognize the letter "F" for "Friendy's" or do they need the obvious ice cream cone?

To see my original 2012 "Weathervane Wednesday" post, click here:
http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2012/12/weathervane-wednesday-brought-to-you-by.html

Click here to see the entire series of Weathervane Wednesday posts!

-------------------------------

Published under a Creative Commons License

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~ Take Two!  A Replacement Weathervane", Nutfield Genealogy, posted August 17, 2016,  (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/08/weathervane-wednesday-take-two.html:  accessed [access date]).

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Tombstone Tuesday ~ John and Mary (Hogg) Stinson, buried in Derry, New Hampshire

This tombstone was photographed at the Forest Hill Cemetery in Derry, New Hampshire.


MEMENTO MORI
ERECTED                       LIKEWISE
In Memory of                 In memory of
  Mr. John Stinson            Mrs. Mary Stinson
who departed                  relict of     
          this Life                   Mr. John Stinson
Febry ye 6th AD        who died Octr.
1785                        4th 1793
      In the 89th                  In the 90th year
Year of his                   of her age
age                                 

John Stinson was born about 1695 and died 5 February 1785 in Londonderry, New Hampshire.  He immigrated to Portsmouth in 1727 and married Mary Hogg.  She was born about 1703 and died 4 October 1793.  Mary Stinson was enumerated in the first federal census in 1790 in Londonderry.

John and Mary Stinson had ten children.  Several sons went on to settle in Starkstown (now Dunbarton, New Hampshire).   Another son, David, was killed by the Indians when captured along with the Stark brothers (John and William) on 28 April 1752 along the Pemigewasset River in Northern New Hampshire.  One of the Stinson daughters, Mary, married Captain William Stark.  Another daughter, Betsey (Jane),  married Stephen Holland, the British Spy around 1751.  You can read all about this Loyalist spy at this link:  


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Published under a Creative Commons License

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday ~ John and Mary (Hogg) Stinson, buried in Derry, New Hampshire", Nutfield Genealogy, posted August 16, 2016, (   http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/08/tombstone-tuesday-john-and-mary-hogg.html:  accessed [access date]). 

Saturday, August 13, 2016

Surname Saturday ~ WINN of Woburn, Massachusetts


Edward Winn, my 10th great grandfather, came to New England about 1635 with his wife and three eldest children.  On 8 February 1640/1 Edward Winn was listed as one of the original men of the town of Woburn, Massachusetts.  The first European child born in Woburn was his fourth child, and my 9th great grandfather, Increase Winn.

Edward Winn was made a freeman on 10 May 1643 in Woburn.  He is mentioned frequently in the Woburn town history, town records, and served as a selectman in 1669.  There is now a Winn Street in Woburn, and just by coincidence, our daughter lived off Winn Street in her first apartment after graduating from college. 

Edward Winn’s will [Middlesex Probate (6:11-2, File #25243)]  was dated in Watertown, Massachusetts on 6 May 1682 and proved 6 October 1682.  It mentions his son Increase Winn, Sarah Winn (daughter of son Joseph), three Cleaveland grandchildren and three Polley grandchildren.  The probate inventory was taken on 11 September 1682 by Deacon Josiah Converse and Ensign James Converse of Woburn, ancestors on my paternal side. 

Some notable descendants of Edward Winn include both President Herbert Hoover (1874 – 1964) and President Grover Cleveland (1837 – 1908).

For More WINN information:

Genealogy of the Cleveland and Cleaveland Families, Edmund Janes Cleveland, 1899, three volumes

History of Woburn, Massachusetts, Samuel Sewall, 1868

“Doubt About the English Origins of Edward Winn and Moses Cleveland of Woburn, Mass” by Martin Hollick, in  MASSOG: A Genealogical Magazine for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts,  Volume 32, pages 57 – 58.

My WINN genealogy:

Generation 1:  Edward Winn, died 5 September 1682 in Woburn, Massachusetts; married to Joanna. Four children.  Married second to Sarah Beal.  Married third to Ann Unknown, widow of Nicholas Wood and William Page. 

Generation 2:  Increase Winn, born 5 December 1641 in Woburn, died 14 December 1690 in Woburn; married on 13 July 1665 in Woburn to Hannah Satell, daughter of Richard Sawtell and Elizabeth Pople.  Hannah was born 10 December 1642 in Watertown, Massachusetts, and died 18 February 1723 in Woburn.  Nine children. 

Generation 3: Mary Winn, born 1 May 1670 in Woburn, died 7 June 1743 in Woburn; married on 28 June 1692 in Woburn to Nathaniel Wyman, son of Francis Wyman and Abigail Reed.  He was born 25 November 1665 in Woburn and died 8 December 1717 in Woburn.  Twelve children.   Mary remarried on 30 November 1720 in Woburn to John Locke, son of William Locke and Mary Clark.  No children.

Generation 4: Increase Wyman m. Deborah Pierce
Generation 5: Increase Wyman m. Catherine Unknown
Generation 6: Jemima Wyman m. Joshua Burnham
Generation 7:  Jemima Burnham m. Romanus Emerson
Generation 8:  George Emerson m. Mary Esther Younger
Generation 9: Mary Katharine Emerson m. George E. Batchelder
Generation 10: Carrie Maude Batchelder m. Joseph Elmer Allen
Generation 11: Stanley Elmer Allen m. Gertrude Matilda Hitchings (my grandparents)

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Published under a Creative Commons License

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Surname Saturday ~ WINN of Woburn, Massachusetts", Nutfield Genealogy, posted August 13, 2016,  ( http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/08/surname-saturday-winn-of-woburn.html: accessed [access date]).

Friday, August 12, 2016

A Treasure box of Documents, Ephemera and Photographs from a Dear Cousin

My dear first cousin, Lani Wilkinson, sent me this treasure box recently.  Her parents both died recently, within a year of each other, and Lani and her sister Debbie are cleaning out the house.  She was kind enough to think of me when they uncovered a lot of paperwork and unidentifiable photographs, and sent me this big box of goodies.



This branch of the Wilkinson family lives in California.  When my grandparents retired, they sold the family house in Beverly, Massachusetts, where four generations had lived, to my Dad.  They went out to California to live with my uncle and cousins.

Since my cousins lived on the West Coast and only visited Massachusetts a few times, they could not identify many of the photos.  I've been working through the photographs, with the help of some of my New England first cousins, to label all the subjects.

My grandmother's naturalization.  She was originally naturalized in Salem,
Massachusetts in 1936,  This certificate was issued in 1963.

The documents and ephemera held no surprise, and have not led to any new genealogical discoveries, but they are some wonderful items including my grandmother's naturalization papers, and her father's (my great grandfather!) naturalization.  There are deeds including the house in Beverly where all those generations lived.  The usual death records, marriage records and other vital records which will be so helpful for some upcoming supplemental Mayflower lineage applications I would like to file.  (I've been waiting for some death certificates from California, and now I have them!)

From left to right, back row -
Dorothy Pogson Davis , Hilda Roberts Pogson, Bertha Roberts Wilkinson (my grandmother), Bertha Pogson Tarbox, Marion Hurd Pogson (wife of Arthur Pogson)
front row - "Beaty" Beatrice Pogson

Some of the old photos are of the Roberts family, which arrived from Leeds, Yorkshire, England via Ellis Island in 1915.  My great grandparents, John Peter Bowden Roberts (1865 - 1925) and Emma Frances Warren (1865 - 1927), immigrated with my great uncle Horace and grandmother Bertha Louise Roberts (1897 - 1990).  They came to Beverly, Massachusetts to join their daughter, my great aunt Hilda (1891 - 1990), who had married a first cousin, Herbert Pogson (1889 - 1971).  Some members of the Roberts and Pogson family had immigrated to Massachusetts before them.  Grammy used to visit these relatives on her visits to New England. It will be fun trying to pick out "who is who" in these photos from the 1940s through the 1980s.

Bertha Louise Roberts and Donald Munroe Wilkinson
4 September 1971
My paternal grandparents
As a teenage genealogist I was lucky that I had the chance to discuss the family tree with my grandmother in the 1970s and 1980s.  I wish I knew then all the tips and research ideas I now know.   I think it was all my grandmother's stories about England and Ellis Island that originally contributed to my being bitten by the genealogy bug.

My grandmother's birth record from Leeds, Yorkshire 30 September 1897

And so, all my grandparents precious photos were passed on to my uncle, and then to my cousins, who thought of me when they found them.  I promise to take good care of them for the future generations.  I look forward to posting more photographs and stories as I sort through the treasure box.

Mom and Me, 1963 Easter
I'd never seen this photograph before! What fun!

Thank you for thinking of me, Lani!  We can't wait to see you here in New England later this year!

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Published under a Creative Commons License

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "A Treasure box of Documents, Ephemera and Photographs from a Dear Cousin", Nutfield Genealogy, posted August 12, 2016, (  http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/08/a-treasure-box-of-documents-ephemera.html:  accessed [access date]).