Tuesday, May 21, 2019

A Family History Visit to the Pyrenees

Uztarroz, Navarra, Spain
My mother-in-law, Maria, was born in the tiny village of Orbaiceta in Navarra, Spain.  This village now has less than 200 people (2017 census), and it is located in the Pyrenees.  It is the last village in Spain before the French border, and she was born in the last house up on hill above the village. You would have to cross over the mountains to France to find the next house.

When she was still a baby, her family removed to the next valley, to the village of Uztarroz, which has about 146 people according to the 2017 census (Wikipedia).  Her father was a carabinero, which was a type of border police, until this force was absorbed into the Guardia Civil in Spain.  The family moved many times during her childhood, especially during the Spanish Civil War.  She lived in Uztarroz until she was about seven years old, after her first communion. My mother-in-law never returned to Navarra or to her childhood villages. At least until this month!

We have tried to bring her to Navarra to see Orbaiceta and Uztarroz, and finally this year she agreed to take the trip. Earlier in May we visited her in Madrid, and took her by train to the city of Pamplona. Then we drove up into the valleys of Pyrenee Mountains to see these villages. Here are the photos of that trip!

The Church of Santa Engracia, where Maria had her first communion around 1940.
The church dates from the 1500s. 

Maria's First Communion, circa 1940

Just by luck, the first woman we met in the street
happened to be the mayor of the town. She
had the key to let us into the church. 

The altar inside Santa Engracia Church
Maria lived in this house, on the second floor,
until she was about seven years old

Next to her childhood house was this little bridge
over a stream. Maria is gesturing to tell us the
size of the rats that used to be found nearby! 


When we left Uztarroz we had to climb up out of one valley into the next valley to find the village of Orbaiceta
This is how the GPS looked climbing up the Pyrenees!
One switchback after another to climb the hills

Orbaiceta, Navarra, Spain (on the French border)

Vincent exploring San Pedro Church in Orbaiceta

The streets were so narrow, I couldn't get the entire church in the photo!
This is the church of San Pedro, where Maria was baptized.
1934, Maria's baptism
This typical house in the town of Orbaiceta is called an "horreo".
It was built on stone pillars, with the animals kept underneath.
The tiny streets of the village of Orbaiceta

The drive back to Pamplona was just as beautiful as
our trip up to the mountains. 




---------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "A Family History Visit to the Pyrenees", Nutfield Genealogy, posted May 21, 2019, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2019/05/a-family-history-visit-to-pyrenees.html: accessed [access date]).

Thursday, May 16, 2019

Nutfield, New Hampshire Genealogy Queries


The query table at the Founders Weekend celebrating
the 300th anniversary of the founding of Nutfield, New Hampshire

These queries were generated during the family reunion and history conference in East Derry, New Hampshire during Founders Weekend April 12 – 14, 2019.  Please peruse these queries to see if you can answer any or if you might know any additional information on these families.  I’ll be collecting more queries, and publishing them on my blog. I hope to find a permanent page or website for these “Nutfield Queries”.

Please post your answers in the comments, or feel free to answer directly to the contact information on each query.

Thank you!


ALEXANDER
Interested in communicating with descendants of Randall Alexander.  From Pat Treadway pgtreadway@gmail.com 

ANDERSON
Looking for info on a (Agnes) Nancy Anderson who was married to Alexander Miller 1725 – 1791. They left Londonderry NH around 1760 and helped establish Truro, Nova Scotia.  Alexander Miller was brother of James Miller who married Mary Alexander, daughter of Randall Alexander. James and Mary Miller left Londonderry and helped establish Belfast, Maine.  It appears the Nancy Anderson, daughter of James Anderson, was unmarried.  The Millers came from Maine to Londonderry.  From mikemck2002@yahoo.com 

Both Morrison’s and Parker’s books state 1st 16 settler James Anderson’s son Robert m. Agnes Craige. Morrison has them with 7 ch. Parker has then with 9 ch. The 8th is “Mary”. A land deed suggests that Robert was married to a “Mary” after “Agnes”. Looking for verification for or against this.  From Ken Bennett kbennettr@verizon.net

ARCHIBALD
Seeking sources of information about the ancestor of John T. Archibald, a Londonderry proprietor in 1722. From Paul Margolin  magslp@comcast.net 

Archibald, Taylor, Wilson.  In particular 2nd generation families who went to Nova Scotia after 1760. From Dorian Hill dorianhill@comcast.net 

ALEXANDER
Any Information from Ireland on Alexander or Randall?  From Gail Pare  gmpare@comcast.net
Interested in Randall Alexander 1667- 1770 Janet Benson 1695 -? Wife and family son Samuel Alexander (1737 Nutfield)  Interested in John Cochran 1675 – 1725, James Cochran 1710 – 1794. From MaryJeanne Cofran Pantanella m.r.pantanella@gmail.com

AYERS
Looking for info on James McCurdy, born 1706, possibly in NH and his wife Elizabeth Ayers born 1707 probably in Londonderry, Ireland.  Interested in their history.  Their daughter Mary McCurdy, born 1732, married James Gregg, born 1725, son of John Gregg.  From Rob Woods robwoods6@yahoo.com


BOYES
James BOYES 1747 will of Londonderry NH names wife Margaret.  Also “my brother William CAVEY or CAREY. Are Margaret and William siblings?  Seek origins of CAVEY/CAREY and BOYES. What became of Margaret? From Nancy Smith familygenerations@gmail.com

BROWN
Thomas Brown, Chester, NH b. Ireland.  Known children:  John Brown, Samuel Brown, sister Elizabeth (Brown) Smith.  Seek family history – possible New Boston, Goffstown and Francestown later residences.  From Nancy Smith  familygenerations@gmail.com 

CAMPBELL
David Campbell 1660-1753 x Elizabeth
Henry Campbell 1697 - 1782 x Martha Black 1696 – 1778
William Campbell 1719 – 1776 x Mary Gregg 1723 – 1805
Was the above Mary Gregg descended from the James Gregg of 1718/19? If so what is the lineage? From Timothy Butterfield WRBFARM1@aol.com

CARGILL
Jennet (Smith) wife of Capt. David Cargill reportly dau. of John and Annis Smith.  Daughters married into McKeen and McGregor families.  Need Jennet Smith Cargill’s siblings.  From N. Smith familygenerations@gmail.com 


CLOUTIER
Interested in connecting with desendants of John Howland of the Mayflower and Zacharie Cloutier of Quebec.  From David J. McRae davidjmcrae@outlook.com 

COCHRAN
Interested in Randall Alexander 1667- 1770 Janet Benson 1695 -? Wife and family son Samuel Alexander (1737 Nutfield)  Interested in John Cochran 1675 – 1725, James Cochran 1710 – 1794. From MaryJeanne Cofran Pantanella m.r.pantanella@gmail.com

GREGG
David Campbell 1660-1753 x Elizabeth
Henry Campbell 1697 - 1782 x Martha Black 1696 – 1778
William Campbell 1719 – 1776 x Mary Gregg 1723 – 1805
Was the above Mary Gregg descended from the James Gregg of 1718/19? If so what is the lineage? From Timothy Butterfield WRBFARM1@aol.com

Looking for verifiable information on the parents of Capt. James Gregg and beyond. I have a name Capt. David Gregg and Jessie Stewart as father and mother, but my daughter has her doubts. I have John MacGregor/Gregg and Ann Palmer as David’s parents.  From Robert Woods  bobwoods38@gmail.com

HOWLAND
Interested in connecting with desendants of John Howland of the Mayflower and Zacharie Cloutier of Quebec.  From David J. McRae davidjmcrae@outlook.com 

HUMPRHIES
Seeking information on the William Humphries family.  From Gail Pare gmpare@comcast.net

KARR KERR CARR
See info on KARR/KERR/CARR.  John Karr captured by Indians 1724 with Thomas Smith his brother-in-law.  Possibly sister Martha Karr/Carr Smith.  Need dates of Martha, parents.  From Nancy smith familygenerations@gmail.com

LINDSAY
Who were the 1600s Lindsay families that went to Ulster plantations?  James Lindsey b. 1680 d. 1774 buried in Nutfield together with his wife Martha b. 1682 d. ?  Son James born in Ireland. B. 1702 c. 1776. Daughter Elizabeth between 1702 – 1710 married Matthew Clark 1722 died 1730, who were their three children?  Daughter Jenat married John Wallace, who were their 6 children?  From Fred_Lindsay@verizon.net 

McCURDY
Looking for info on James McCurdy, born 1706, possibly in NH and his wife Elizabeth Ayers born 1707 probably in Londonderry, Ireland.  Interested in their history.  Their daughter Mary McCurdy, born 1732, married James Gregg, born 1725, son of John Gregg.  From Rob Woods robwoods6@yahoo.com

McGREGOR
Robert MacGregor Jr (1796 – 1881) son of Col. Robert McGregor, Esq. md. Mary Havens in Rhode Island? Ch. Born in RI  son David (1817 – 1891)  What was Robt. Doing in R.I? Other children? From cherribrew@comcast.net 

David MacGregor 1817 – 1891 b. RI,  son of Robert MacGregor and Mary Havens of RI. Siblings?  When back to NH from RI?  From cherribrew@comcast.net

McKEEN
Samuel McKeen’s 1751 wil mentions “my brother Adam Clark”. Who was Adam Clark? From Judy Mann judy.mann5@gmail.com

James McKeen 1728-1800 married “Margaret” supposedly “Alexander” surname. Was she local Alexander or from PA?  from Judy Mann  judy.mann5@gmail.com

Seeking information on all descendants of James McKeen and wife.  Need marriage record for John McKeen and Martha Cargill circa 1730 – 1732 from Jack MacKeen Mackeenresearch@verizon.net

Looking for information on Samuel McKeen 1703 – 1753 married 8/15/1723 Agnes Houston Clark (b. 1702? D.) That’s all I have.  From lisangelini@yahoo.com 

McPHERSON
McRoberts, Margaret = Johnson, James b. 1719 N. Ireland.  McPherson, Hugh b. ca 1750.  Nichols, David b. ca. 1750   In Nova Scotia – Any Nutfield connections?  From Dorian Hill dorianhill@comcast.net

McROBERTS
McRoberts, Margaret = Johnson, James b. 1719 N. Ireland.  McPherson, Hugh b. ca 1750.  Nichols, David b. ca. 1750   In Nova Scotia – Any Nutfield connections?  From Dorian Hill dorianhill@comcast.net

MOOR
Arrived 1720 Charter Samuel Moor and wife Mary
1720 Charter John Moore b. 1692 (nephew and adopted son of Samuel)
1724 Biological son of Samuel Moore b. 1683 and wife Jennet and 2 children, had 2 more in Londonderry.  Want marriage birth info. Where did they come from- Antrim, Northern Ireland Londonderry or Coleraine.  Any information or contacts working on MOOR helpful.  From Karen.johnson@sbcglobal.net 

NICHOLS
McRoberts, Margaret = Johnson, James b. 1719 N. Ireland.  McPherson, Hugh b. ca 1750.  Nichols, David b. ca. 1750   In Nova Scotia – Any Nutfield connections?  From Dorian Hill dorianhill@comcast.net

NUTT
William Nutt. He was on the brigantine “Robert” one of the five ships that arrived in Boston Harbor on August 4, 1718. He settled in Nutfield and worked as an apprentice of Captain David Cargill (Calgik).  He is not listed as one of the original families of Nutfield.  I’m looking for information on what he did between landing in Boston and settling in Nutfield and when he did settle there.  From Steven Davis  wonalancet@gmail.com

RANDALL
Any Information from Ireland on Alexander or Randall?  From Gail Pare  gmpare@comcast.net


RANKIN
Interested in any info on Hugh Rankin and his family history here and in Ireland (His grave is in Forest Hill Cemetery listed as Hugh Ranken) His daughter Agnes Rankin married John Gregg. Hugh’s wife was probably Agnes Dunlop.  But we know nothing of Rankin’s family.  From Rob Woods  robwoods6@yahoo.com 

REID
Martha REID wife of Robert Wear Sr. Need Info regarding her family (parents, sibs, etc.) Wear spelling WARE WEIR WIER.   From Margaret Clark clarkm227@gmail.com 

SHIRLEY
Our first ancestor in America, James Shirley of Chester, born according to the History of Hillsborough County, in 1649 in Scotland, went to Northern Ireland when he was 12 yrs old, came to Chester, NH in 1730, died 1754 Chester. Where, and if in Scotland? Where buried?  Son of James, John Shirley b. 1688 Ulster, died in Chester, some evidence he was the John Shirley in Aghadowey Session book.  From Lisa Hoag, daughter of Mary Shirley Hoag  lisahoag@gmail.com

SMITH
Jennet (Smith) wife of Capt. David Cargill reportly dau. of John and Annis Smith.  Daughters married into McKeen and McGregor families.  Need Jennet Smith Cargill’s siblings.  From N. Smith familygenerations@gmail.com 

I am searching for the date of immigration of James Smith and wife Jean and location from which they came.  Earliest land acquisition in Londonderry that I have found was 1722.  From Richard Smith smithrl@roadrunner.com 

I am seeking the maiden surname and dates of birth and death of Jean Smith, widow of James Smith who died in Londonderry, NH in 1753.  Jean’s will was drawn in 1766, identifying James Todd as executor.  Will was proved in 1767 but date of death, burial location and age at time of death remain unknown to me.  She may have been residing with her daughter and son-in-law (Susannah and James Todd) at the time of her death.  It is not confirmed that they lived in Londonderry.  From Richard Smith smithrl@roadrunner.com

Thomas Brown, Chester, NH b. Ireland.  Known children:  John Brown, Samuel Brown, sister Elizabeth (Brown) Smith.  Seek family history – possible New Boston, Goffstown and Francestown later residences.  From Nancy Smith  familygenerations@gmail.com 


TAYLOR
Archibald, Taylor, Wilson.  In particular 2nd generation families who went to Nova Scotia after 1760. From Dorian Hill dorianhill@comcast.net 

WEIR
Our Robert Weir 1669 – 1843) born in Virginia ended up in Indiana. Is he any relation to the Nutfield WEIR?    From Jane Greiner glenarborgirl@gmail.com 

WILSON
Need info or citation for Olive Fox (wife of Alexander Wilson 1659- 1752) b. circa 1660? From Pam Wilson cyberpam@mindspring.com

Archibald, Taylor, Wilson.  In particular 2nd generation families who went to Nova Scotia after 1760. From Dorian Hill dorianhill@comcast.net 

What was the occupation of Alexander Wilson 1659 – 1752?  Who was his wife?  From plouffowler@gmail.com

What / Where are the NW Liberties of Londonderry, Ireland?  From Pam Wilson cyberpam@mindspring.com

Which London companies were granted land in/around Ballymony Ireland during the plantation, and what products or trades were featured? Thanks, from Richard F. Wilson RFWilson@mindspring.com 


Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Weathervane Wednesday - A Russian Bomber?

Today's weathervanes were spotted by a reader.  Can anyone add a back story (or any other information) to these mysterious weathervanes?  They are two of the most unique and unusual weathervanes I've seen.



These two weathervanes were spotted by Steve LeBel of New Hampshire.  He was on his way to visit Oldham Cemetery in Peru, Maine (my kind of field trip!) when he passed Greenwoods Road near Worthy Pond.  He spotted these weathervanes and took these photographs.  Both were located on the same property, and Steve guessed that "The owner has to be an aviation fan" and that "I believe it is a Russian TU-95 Bear that has been in service since 1956".

Steve also said "Having been in the Air Force during the Cold War, those planes were an icon of the Soviet Empire, our then enemy.  This plane is back in the news because it was used against ISIS in Syria... Here is an interesting link: https://twitter.com/hashtag/tu95  The plane on the cement post was set far back in the middle of the yard.  I believe the one on the building was a garage.  I was amazed by the accuracy and size of the planes. A rough guess is that they were about 6 feet long."

Does anyone out there know more about these weathervanes of the Russian bombers?

Photographs courtesy of Steve LeBel

--------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo and Steve LeBel, "Weathervane Wednesday - A Russian Bomber?", Nutfield Genealogy, posted May 15, 2019, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2019/05/weathervane-wednesday-russian-bomber.html: accessed [access date]).

Friday, May 10, 2019

Researching Your Ancestors in Concord, New Hampshire

The New Hampshire State Library

This blog post is part of the lecture I presented at the Founders Day event held in East Derry, New Hampshire on April 12 - 14.  I'll be covering the resources available for genealogical research in Derry, Londonderry, Manchester, Concord and Windham, New Hampshire.  All the links will be posted above under "Nutfield FAQ's"

In Concord there are four places to visit for genealogical information. The first two are The New Hampshire State Library and the New Hampshire Historical Society, and they are located side by side on Park Street across the street from the New Hampshire State Capitol Building.  The first, the State Library is free to the public, and the NHHS is a private organization, with memberships, but open to the public for a $7 admission fee (the research library, too).


New Hampshire State Library Genealogy Research Room
The New Hampshire State Library is the oldest state library in the United States, founded in 1717.  It is open free to the public, with a lovely genealogy research room.  There is an online catalog for items acquired form 1980 to today.  The genealogy room has over 2400 published family histories, town and county histories, town reports, town records, military indexes, legislative biographies, New Hampshire federal census records, and New Hampshire newspapers on microfilm.  They take research requests for up to ten photocopies (see the website below).

The New Hampshire Historical Society
The New Hampshire Historical Society research room is open to the public for a fee.  Members are free of charge.  All personal items must be placed in lockers, and all researchers must register at the librarian's desk. Appointments may be required to view some material. I would highly suggest contacting the librarian ahead of time for an appointment so the staff can pull the materials you would like to view.  There is a research service for a fee available for those who cannot visit in person.  See the website for more information on filling out the research request form, and the payment information.  Cameras are allowed, with permission, and the NHHS also charges a fee for high resolution image files of items in the collection.

The NHHS also has a great website with many images online, an online card catalog, and much information about the collections and the research room.  See the link below. There is also a link to the New Hampshire History Network, which includes collections from across the state.

The New Hampshire Vital Records and the New Hampshire State Archives

Across town, less than ten minutes away, at 9 Ratification Drive, is the building that houses both the New Hampshire Vital Records and the Archives.  They not only share the building, but they share the research room.   On the left is the New Hampshire State Archives and Records Management, and on the right is the New Hampshire Vital Records Administration.

These cabinets hold the birth, marriage, divorce, and death records

These boxes hold the cards with the records

Deborah Moore, of the Vital Records staff, holds a birth record
 There are volunteers on staff at the vital records research room to help you find your ancestors in the records.  The general public has access to birth records before 1911, and to deaths, marriages and divorces before 1961 for genealogy research. If you are an immediate family member with "direct and tangible interest" you are eligible to request and receive certified copies of vital records that are restricted due to their age.  These records are copies sent to Concord from the town and city clerks across New Hampshire.

The New Hampshire State Archives side of the reading room

The New Hampshire State Archives holds the documents and artifacts from the history of New Hampshire state government, and makes them available to the public.  Some of the items of genealogical importance include probate records, land title deeds (1630s - 1959 for some counties), petitions to the governor and legislature, all 40 volumes of the New Hampshire Provincial and State Papers (and cumulative index), military indices, censuses, name changes, naturalizations, voter checklists, warnings out, town records, town inventories, maps, paupers indices, and court records.


Places to Visit:

The New Hampshire State Library at 20 Park Street, Concord, New Hampshire
(603) 271-2616  https://www.nh.gov/nhsl/   Open Monday to Friday 8am to 4:30pm

The New Hampshire Historical Society Library at 30 Park Street, Concord, New Hampshire
(603) 228-6688  https://www.nhhistory.org/   Open Tuesday to Saturday 9:30am to 5pm
Members are admitted free, and admission is $7.  All researchers must register at the library desk, all cameras must be registered and the librarian on duty must give approval.

The New Hampshire Vital Records Administration, at 9 Ratification Way (formerly 71 South Fruit Street), Concord, New Hampshire.  (603) 271-4650  http://sos.nh.gov/vital_records.aspx 
The Research Room is open Monday to Friday 8:30am to 3:30pm.

The New Hampshire State Archives and Records Management at 9 Ratification Way, Concord, New Hampshire.  (603) 271-2236  http://sos.nh.gov/Arch_Rec_Mgmt.aspx    The Research Room is open Monday to Friday 8:30am to 3:30pm.  The genealogy page is http://sos.nh.gov/Genealogy.aspx

If you have ancestors from Concord you might also want to visit the local library and historical society:

The Concord Public Library, Concord Room Collection
45 Green Street, Concord, New Hampshire
(603) 225-8670  http://www.onconcord.com/library 
Open Monday - Wednesday 8:30 to 8:30, Thursday 11am - 5:30pm, Friday - Saturday 8:30 - 5:30, and Sundays (Sept to April) 1pm to 5:30pm

The Concord Historical Society, PO Box 1027, Concord, New Hampshire
http://concordhistoricalsociety.org/   
and on Facebook  https://www.facebook.com/Concord-NH-Historical-Society-123766490978765/


For the truly curious:

Index to Genealogies in New Hampshire Town Histories, by William Copely, New Hampshire Historical Society

Manchester Historic Association Collections (published 1899 – 1914 in 12 volumes)

New Hampshire Provincial and State Papers (40 volumes)

New Hampshire Genealogy and History at SearchRoots  http://www.nh.searchroots.com/


Blogs:




Cow Hampshire by Janice Webster Brown  http://www.cowhampshireblog.com/ 

------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Researching Your Ancestors in Concord, New Hampshire", Nutfield Genealogy, posted May 7, 2019, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2019/05/researching-your-ancestors-in-concord.html: accessed [access date]).

Thursday, May 9, 2019

Researching Your Ancestors in Manchester, New Hampshire


This blog post is part of the lecture I presented at the Founders Day event held in East Derry, New Hampshire on April 12 - 14.  I'll be covering the resources available for genealogical research in Derry, Londonderry, Manchester, Concord and Windham, New Hampshire.  All the links will be posted above under "Nutfield FAQ's".

American Canadian Genealogical Society
Don't be put off by the name, but the American Canadian Genealogical Society is a great small genealogy library on Elm Street in downtown Manchester for anyone to do their family history research. There is free parking and a great staff of volunteers waiting to assist you with your family tree, even if your ancestors are not French Canadian.  I did much of my Mayflower lineage research here when I first applied to the Mayflower Society, and I don't have a single French Canadian ancestor.  The collection is heavily weighted towards the French speaking records in the French speaking provinces, especially the Roman Catholic records. However, it is also a genealogy society, with general genealogy information, local and state histories, and a store with genealogy charts and gifts.  It is also an affiliate Family History Center with computer access to the LDS collections in Salt Lake City.

It is helpful to make an appointment ahead of time with the staff, and they will arrange to have a research assistant available to help.  They will also pull all relevant material and have it waiting for you when you visit.  There is a lunch room with snacks and drinks available, and a waiting area for friends and family members who accompany you to the ACGS.  Very thoughtful!  See the link below for more information.

The Manchester Historic Association Research Facility

The Manchester Historic Association Research Center is located diagonally across the street from the Manchester Public Library.  You can park once, and spend hours doing your family research in both facilities.  The Manchester Historic Association is a private organization, so it's members are welcome free, but there is an admission fee for non-members.  If you are unable to visit in person, there is a research service for fee, too (see the website for details).  The card catalog is online, as well as a photo database of over 900 images of Manchester.

The collections include the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company Records including employee cards from 1911 to the 1930s, Manchester school registers, a large library of books, business and family papers, photographs, oral histories, the Dignam Music Collection, biographies of notable residents, and more. See the finding aids online at the website.  The Manchester Historic Association also operates the Millyard Museum at 200 Bedford Street.

The Manchester Public Library
The Manchester Public Library has a main building on Pine Street, facing Victory Park, and diagonally across from the Manchester Historic Association.   There is an online card catalog and research services available (see the website for details and fees).  You will want to visit the New Hampshire Room for the local history resources (Limited hours and by appointment – collections include town histories, biographies of NH residents, Manchester history and government, genealogies of NH families.  There are also computers with access to Ancestry.com )

Manchester City Hall
The Manchester City Archives are located in the basement of the City Hall on Elm Street. This is where the city stores the historic records dating back to the days of Derryfield and the former Derryfield meetinghouse in the 1700s.  There are vital records for Manchester, city directories, oral histories, photograph collections,  tax records (real estate, poll, and other)  welfare records, including the “overseers of the poor”, and non-city recors such as photographs, postcards, personal papers and business records. The archives are available only with an appointment made at least 24 hours in advance, and are open only during city hall's regular hours. See the website below.  All requests must be made in writing (not by phone or email). 


Places to visit:

American Canadian Genealogical Society,  at 4 Elm Street, Manchester, New Hampshire
The ACGS will be moving soon!  Stay tuned for the new address!
(603) 622-1554   https://acgs.org/    Members free, $10 day fee for non-members
Open Wednesdays 9am - 4pm, Fridays and Saturdays 9am - 4pm, Sundays 1pm - 4pm

Manchester Historic Association Research Center, 29 Amherst Street, Manchester, New Hampshire
Open Saturdays 10am – 4pm, Wednesday 10am – 3pm, and by appointment (send a detailed email to library@manchesterhistoric.org )   Free to members, $8 adults, $6 seniors and college students, $4 children 12 - 18, and free to children under 12. 

The Manchester Municipal Archives and Records Center, in City Hall basement, One City Hall Plaza, Manchester, New Hampshire
(603) 624-6455    Open Monday - Friday 8am - 5pm by appointment only

                
Manchester Public Library, at 405 Pine Street, Manchester, New Hampshire
(603) 624-6550  http://www.manchester.lib.nh.us/ 
Open Monday, Tuesday, Thursday,  9:30am - 8:30pm. Wednesday and Friday 9:30am - 5:30pm, Saturdays 9:30am - 2:30pm

        
For the truly curious:

The History of Manchester, Formerly Derryfield, in New Hampshire, by Chandler Eastman Potter, 1856  (online at Archive.org )

Manchester on the Merrimack, by Grace Holbrook Blood, 1975

Willey's Semi-centennial Book of Manchester, by George Franklyn Willey, 1896

Manchester Historic Association Collections (published 1899 – 1914 in 12 volumes)


Blogs:


Cow Hampshire by Janice Webster Brown  http://www.cowhampshireblog.com/ 


--------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Researching Your Ancestors in Manchester, New Hampshire", Nutfield Genealogy, posted May 9, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2019/05/researching-your-ancestors-in.html: accessed [access date]). 

Saturday, May 4, 2019

Please Volunteer for the Honor Roll Project for Memorial Day 2019

Dunbarton, New Hampshire

Please join me in the Honor Roll Project.  Volunteers are taking photos of war memorials and honor rolls, posting them on their blogs and websites, and transcribing the names of all the people listed.  These transcriptions make the names available for search engines, and the names will be available for people searching for family, ancestors and friends.

I started this project in 2010 with the photos of the Londonderry Civil War monument, and then followed with the other war monuments on the town common, Derry’s MacGregor Park and other local honor rolls.  Other bloggers and photographers were invited to participate.  We now have contributions from nearly all the United States, and from five other countries.  The email and comments I have read are truly inspiring, and it makes it well worth the effort to transcribe names when you read how family members found their fathers and grandfathers online, or how families searching their family trees find ancestors who served in the Civil War or World War I. 

"I never knew my ancestor was in the Civil War until I Googled his name and found it on your blog! Thanks so much for your project - Charles Chase" 13 Dec 2011

" Thank you! Aina Bernier- daughter of Ernest Albert Bernier, Jr." 27 Jan 2011

If you would like to participate this year, I will be posting a compilation post of all the participating bloggers on Memorial Day, May 27th, 2018 .  All contributions will be permanently available on the Honor Roll Project website at https://honorrollproject.weebly.com/    Every November for Veteran’s / Armistice Day I publicize this project for more volunteers and contributors, and again in May I publicize the project for Memorial Day .

To participate, leave me a comment below or an email at vrojomit@gmail.com   All you need to do is photograph a local honor roll or war monument, and transcribe the names.  If you have a blog, post the story, photos and transcriptions and send me the permanent link for the Honor Roll Project.  If you don’t have a blog, I can post the photo and names for you and add it to the Honor Roll Project, giving you full credit for the photography and transcription.  Or contact your favorite genealogy blogger, and they would be happy to post your photo and transcription, too. 

This is a simple way of saying “Thank You” to all the veterans in our communities- past and present. 

The Honor Roll Project Page:  https://honorrollproject.weebly.com/    

Friday, May 3, 2019

Researching Nutfield Ancestors in Londonderry, New Hampshire


This blog post is part of the lecture I presented at the Founders Day event held in East Derry, New Hampshire on April 12 - 14.  I'll be covering the resources available for genealogical research in Derry, Londonderry, Manchester, Concord and Windham, New Hampshire.  All the links will be posted above under "Nutfield FAQ's"

The Londonderry Leach Public Library has quite a few genealogical resources in the main reading room. There is a book case full of genealogy books and reference materials. The library computers can access Ancestry, Biography in Context, and Heritage Quest (also available from home).  There is a 35 page PDF of the "Historical and Genealogical Holdings" at this link:
http://londonderrynh.org/Pages/LondonderryNH_LeachLibrary/Reference%20Services/REFPDF/HisHold


Most of the historical resources are held in The History Room behind the reference section of the library. You must sign in at the reference desk for key to this locked room.  All coats and bags must be stored in a locker before you enter this room.

The History Room contains all the town reports, the New Hampshire Provincial and State Papers, local histories, and the early records of Londonderry.  There are file folders with family information in the glass cabinet pictured above.  Below you can see what these folders, contain, and a photo of the BOYD family folder. If you have genealogy charts, reports and stories to add to these folders, please contact the reference librarian.


The BOYD family folder


The Londonderry Historical Society also is a wonderful resource for information about your Nutfield ancestors.  The museum complex on Pillsbury Road is open by appointment, by chance, and on special occasions such as Old Home Day in August. The staff and board members of the Historical Society can answer your questions about Londonderry history, and the displays inside the Morrison House, Parmenter Barn, and Blacksmith Shop contain many artifacts from early Nutfield history right up to the early 20th century.






Places to visit:

Londonderry Public Library, 276 Mammoth Road, Londonderry, New Hampshire
(603) 432-1132   http://londonderrynh.org/Pages/LondonderryNH_LeachLibrary/index 

Londonderry Historical Society, 140 Pillsbury Road, Londonderry, New Hampshire
(603) 432-2005   http://www.londonderryhistory.org/
Open on Old Home Day, special events, and by appointment. Monthly meetings usually at the public library (check the website)


For the truly curious:

The History of Londonderry, comprising the towns of Derry and Londonderry, N. H, by Rev. Edward L. Parker, 1851

Willey’s Book of Nutfield, by George Frankyn Willey, 1895

Index to Genealogies in New Hampshire Town Histories, by William Copely, New Hampshire Historical Society

Irish Settlers of Southern New Hampshire, by James Francis Brennan, 1910

Manchester Historic Association Collections (published 1899 – 1914 in 12 volumes)

New Hampshire Provincial and State Papers (40 volumes)

New Hampshire Society of Genealogists   http://nhsog.org/  

Blogs:


Nutfield History by Paul Lindemann  https://www.nutfieldhistory.org/ 

Cow Hampshire  by Janice Webster Brown  http://www.cowhampshireblog.com/

Forgotten Journeys by Timothy McQuaid https://forgottenjourneys.blogspot.com/ 

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Researching Nutfield Ancestors in Londonderry, New Hampshire", Nutfield Genealogy, posted May 3, 2019, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2019/05/researching-nutfield-ancestors-in.html: accessed [access date].

Thursday, May 2, 2019

Researching Nutfield Ancestors in Derry, New Hampshire

This blog post is part of the lecture I presented at the Founders Day event held in East Derry, New Hampshire on April 12 - 14.  I'll be covering the resources available for genealogical research in Derry, Londonderry, Manchester, Concord and Windham, New Hampshire.  All the links will be posted above under "Nutfield FAQ's".

The Derry Public Library has many resources to help you with your genealogical research. The computers in the reading room have access to American Ancestors (The New England Historic Genealogical Society, only accessible at the library), Ancestry Plus (only accessible at the library),  and Heritage Quest (may be used at home, and this includes digitized books such as Willey's Book of Manchester, immigration records, census information, etc.).  There are how-to books on genealogy, and some general genealogy resources in the reference section. You can access the card catalog online at home to plan your visit.

The New Hampshire Room at the Derry Public Library holds all the historical resources. These include Derry town history, New Hampshire state history, notable Derry residents and local genealogical research.  Some of these are available online such as the Derry News Archives, The Derry Obituary Index (this index points to obituaries from the Derry News, which are on microfilm in the New Hampshire Room, the Historic House Survey, The Derry Public Library Scrapbook 1926 - 1943, Derry Town Reports 1858 - 2008, and the Forest Hill Cemetery Plot Finder, and a database of Historic Postcards of Derry.



The MacGregor coat of arms stained glass window was installed
in the old part of the library.  In 1926 Henry F. MacGregor's will
left money to buy land and build a new library, which was dedicated in 1927



If you visit the New Hampshire Room in person you will find lots of town histories, yearbooks, maps, folders of newsclippings, interviews, and more to assist you with your research. There is a microfilm reader and files of microfilm of Derry News (1880 - 2017), Nutfield News (2005 - 2017), Derry Enterprise (1905 - 1919), and Derry Times (1903 - 1908).  The more you poke around in this room, the more you will find!

Derry History Museum

The Derry History Museum is also a valuable resource.  The staff is knowledgeable of Derry History and can answer your questions.


Places to visit:

Derry Public Library, 64 East Broadway, Derry, New Hampshire  https://derrypl.org/
The webpage for the “New Hampshire” room at Derry Public Library

Derry History Museum, 29 West Broadway #6, Derry, New Hampshire
(603), 434-1247   Open Sundays 1-5pm and by appointment
www.derryhistorymuseum.org 
Facebook page    https://www.facebook.com/DerryHistoryMuseum/ 


For the truly curious:

The History of Londonderry, comprising the towns of Derry and Londonderry, N. H, by Rev. Edward L. Parker, 1851

Willey’s Book of Nutfield, by George Frankyn Willey, 1895

Index to Genealogies in New Hampshire Town Histories, by William Copely, New Hampshire Historical Society

Manchester Historic Association Collections (published 1899 – 1914 in 12 volumes)

New Hampshire Provincial and State Papers (40 volumes)

Blogs:


Nutfield History  https://www.nutfieldhistory.org/ 

Cow Hampshire   http://www.cowhampshireblog.com/ 

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Researching Nutfield Ancestors in Derry, New Hampshire", Nutfield Genealogy, posted May 2, 2019, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2019/05/researching-nutfield-ancestors-in-derry.html: accessed [access date]).