Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Jean HOLLAND, died 1768 in Londonderry (now Derry), New Hampshire

This tombstone was photographed at the Forest Hill Cemetery in Derry, New Hampshire.



HERE LYES THE BODY
OF JEAN HOLLAND
DAUGHTER TO STEPH^N
HOLLAND AND
JEAN HOLLAND DE-
PARTED THIS LIFE JANRY
10TH 1768 AGED 7 MONTHS
7 DAYS

Stephen Holland was born about 1733 in Coleraine, Northern Ireland.  He was a member of Roger’s Rangers and was wounded at the battle of Fort William Henry and wounded again at the battle of Quebec.  He received a pension for her service and wounds, and removed to Londonderry and lived on a plot of land in East Derry across from the present day First Parish Church.  Colonel Holland opened a tavern here.

He married Jane/Jean Stinson around 1751 and they had nine children live to adulthood.  Jane/Jean is the only one buried in Derry (then known as Londonderry, New Hampshire). 

In 1773 the town of Londonderry proclaimed allegiance to Governor Wentworth, an appointed Royal Governor during the midst of pre Revolutionary War unrest. Holland was suspected of being the author of this proclamation. When the town of Londonderry called a town meeting to send delegates to the Exeter Congress that same year, Holland, as Justice of the Peace, ordered the meeting closed.  Holland was a very unpopular man while the rest of Londonderry’s inhabitants were patriots. Some suspected that Holland was a British spy.

To save face Holland stood up at a town meeting in 1775 and proclaimed his allegiance to the patriot cause.  The men at the meeting voted they were “satisfactory for his conduct” and a month later they elected him as moderator in place of the usual moderator, Matthew Thornton, who was at the Provincial Congress.  On June 18, 1775 Holland secretly went to the seacoast to recruit a militia of 200 men to assist the British.  He even signed the Association Test in 1776, which swore allegiance to George Washington.  He had fooled the town one more time!

Later, in 1778, he was found out and his property was confiscated and sold by the Committee of Safety.  On the same day the following other men were banished, too:  Richard Holland, John Davidson, James Fulton, Thomas Smith, and Dennis O’Hala.   There was a Captain Stephen Holland in the Prince of Wale’s American Volunteers in 1782.  His final burial place is unknown (and probably not in the Derry or Londonderry area!) 

You can read more about Colonel Stephen Holland “Spy Master” at this link to an article written by Richard Holmes, the Derry Town Historian:  http://www.londonderrynh.net/2014/08/stephen-holland-spy-master/75199


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Published under a Creative Commons License

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday ~ Jean HOLLAND, died 1768 in Londonderry (now Derry), New Hampshire", Nutfield Genealogy, posted  July 26, 2016, (  http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/07/tombstone-tuesday-jean-holland-died.html: accessed [access date]).  

Monday, July 25, 2016

Transcription of an Early Nutfield Map



Last week I published a blog post about the first plots of land granted to families in Nutfield It was an extremely popular post, generating over 1000 hits in just a few days.  There were lots of comments on Facebook and email about the early Nutfield families and their surnames.  A reader asked about the names on the map I used to illustrate this post.  This map was taken from Willey’s Book of Nutfield.  She couldn’t read the tiny handwriting and she wanted to know the names.  Below I will transcribe the names from this map.

On the left side of the map (South):

James and John Doak. Nutfield.
Sixty Acres laid out Sept. 29, 1720
Recorded Oct 1, 1720

Henry Green. Nutfield
Sixty acres laid out 1720
Recorded October 8, 1722

Abel Merrill. Nutfield
Sixty acres laid out 1720

Robert Doak.  Nutfield

Alexander Walker. Nutfield
Sixty acres laid out 1720
Recorded Dec.ber. 9, 1725

Alexander Walker. Nutfield
Sixty acres laid out 1720
Recorded Dec.ber 9, 1725

John Clark.  Nutfield
Sixty acres laid out 1720
Recorded Dec. 25, 1720

James Anderson.  Nutfield
Sixty acres laid out 1720
Recorded March 2, 1721

James Alexander.  Nutfield
Sixty acres laid out Feb. 1719
Recorded Nov. 5, 1720

James Morrison. Nutfileld
Sixty acres laid out Feb. 1719
Recorded Nov. 5, 1720

John Mitchell. Nutfield
Sixty acres laid out 1720
Recorded May 24, 1721

Archilbald Clendennen.  Nutfield
Sixty acres laid out March 15, 1719
Recorded April 4, 1729

John Barnard.  Nutfield
Sixty acres laid out March 15, 1719
Recorded April 4, 1720

James McKeen and Sons.  Nutfield
One hundred and twenty six acres
Laid out August 5, 1719
Recorded July 20, 1720

Jonathan Tyler. Nutfield
Forty-five acres
Laid out Sept 20, 1720
Recorded Sept. 28, 1720

Down the middle of the map are a road and a brook running north to south

The road is labeled “Road laid out by the selectmen June 1, 1723”
The brook is labeled “West running brook along which the first sixteen families settled”

To the right of the brook (North) are two parcels.  The western parcel is labeled “John McConoghy. Sixty acres laid out in Nutfield 1720.  Recorded Feb. 15, 1722”  and the other is labeled “Common Field”

Next, to the north are plots laid out west to east:

James Gregg
Two lots of sixty acres each
Laid out in Nutfield 1720
Recorded July 13, 1720

John Gregg
Sixty acres laid out in
Nutfield March 1720
Recorded July 13, 1720

James Clark
Sixty acres laid out in
Nutfield 1720
Recorded Dec. 25, 1720

James Nesmith
Sixty acres laid out in
Nutfield Feb. 5, 1720
Recoded Oct. 4, 1720

Revd. James McGregor
Sixty acres in Nutfield
Laid out in 1720
Recorded March 24, 1720

Allen Anderson

Robert Wear
Sixty acres laid out in
Nutfield Aug.  1719
Recorded July 20, 1720

John Morrison
Sixty acres laid out in
Nutfield March 1720
Recorded July 20, 1720

Samuel Allison
Sixty acres laid out in
Nutfield 1720
Recorded March 22, 1720

Thomas Steele

John Stewart
Fifty one acres laid out in
Nutfield 1720
Recorded Feb. 25, 1722

Across the map running south to north is a road labeled “Road laid out June 1, 1723”
There is a road running north of the brook labeled “Road laid out Oct. 23, 1723”
North of the plots of land are several landmarks labeled “Beaver River and Meadow”,  “Gristmill”,  “Sawmill” June 7, 1719” and  “Meeting house January 11, 1720”

At the top of the map is a compass and a label that reads:
“Prepared and drawn
By Revd. J. G. MacMurphy
All rights reserved”
And a  line labeled “one hundred rods” for scale.

You can find the recordings of these plots of land in the book Early Records of the Town of Londonderry, Windham and Derry, NH. 1719 – 1745, edited by George Waldo Brown, Manchester, NH:  Manchester Historic Association, 1914.  For example on pages 20 and 21 you can see the following entry for Jonathan Tyler’s plot of land:

Nutfield septem ye 20th 1720
Laid out to Jonathan Tyler by order of the Comity of Nutfield afore said a Lott of Land Containing fourty five acres which is to made up sixty acres in the first draught of the Common Lands buted and bounded as followeth beginning at the nor west Corner at a stake and heep of stons from then runing a due south line by marked tres and Joyning all the way upon mr Mc Keens Lott unto Leverets farm from thence running a due east line thirty Rhod to the bounds first mentioned to gather with an intrest in the Common or undevided Lands within the said township equal to oather lotts in said Town

James mc Keen
James Gregg
Samu Graves
Robart Wear
John Moreson
John Goffe
      Commite
Recorded this 28 September 1720  Pr John Goffe Town Clerke


 To make this map easier to read I have rotated it 45 degrees from the original view so that the handwriting can be read from left to right.  You can also download the map (which is a JPG file) and then zoom in to read the handwriting.  This map is from page 8 of Willey's Book of Nutfield, by George Frankly Willey, 1869, which can be read online at this link:

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Published under a Creative Commons License

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Transcription of an Early Nutfield Map", Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 25, 2016, (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/07/transcription-of-early-nutfield-map.html:  accessed [access date]).

Saturday, July 23, 2016

Surname Saturday ~ FISKE of Salem, Wenham and Chelmsford, Massachusetts


FISKE, FISK

John Fiske, my 9th great grandfather, was born in South Elmham, Suffolk, England and attended King’s College in Cambridge where he studied medicine and received a diploma in 1625.  He married Ann Gipps and removed to Massachusetts in 1637 on board the Mary Ann, with his wife, two sisters, mother (who died at sea) and younger brother, William.  

John Fiske first taught grammar school in Cambridge, and then in Salem where one of his students was the young Sir George Downing (my 9th great grand uncle, sister to my ancestress Lucy Downing (1625 – 1697) wife of William Norton).   George Downing became minister for Cromwell and Charles II,  and he owned the house at which is now the  famous #10 Downing Street, residence of the Prime Minister.

His first three children were born in Salem, and then he removed to Enon (now the town of Wenham) where he was ordained there as the first minister in 1644.  His daughter Ann, my 8th great grandmother, was the first child to be baptized there in 1646.  He later removed to Chelmsford to be the first minister there in 1655.  His wife, Ann, died before him in 1672 and he remarried to Elizabeth, the widow of Edmund Henchman. 

Ann, his daughter, in 1677 married Capt. John Brown of Reading as his first (of three) wives. His third wife was Elizabeth (Bulkley) Emerson, who was also my 8th great grandmother, wife of Reverend Joseph Emerson (1620 – 1680), a minister at Ipswich, York, and Wells, Maine.   Ann and John Brown had a daughter, Mary (1678 – 1740), who married Peter Emerson (1673 – 1751), the son of Elizabeth and Joseph Emerson.   Peter had been raised by John Brown as an orphan, and married his stepsister.

More FISKE resources:

“Genealogical Research in England: The Fiske Family”, by G. Andrews Moriarty, New England Historic Genealogical Society Register, Volume 86 (1932), pages 406 -35 and Volume 87 (1933), pages 141 – 46, pages 217 – 224,  and pages 367 – 374 and Volume 88 (1934) pages 142 – 146, pages 265 – 273, pages    (The English origins of the ancestors of Rev. John Fiske)

Genealogical Dictionary of New England, by James Savage,  Volume 2

The Notebook of Reverend John Fiske:  1644 – 1675, edited by Robert G. Pope, 1974

Fiske and Fisk Family, Being the record of the descendants of Symond Fiske, lord of the manor of Stadhaugh, Suffolk County, England, from the time of Henry IV to date, including all the American members of the family, compiled by Frederick C. Pierce, 1896,  also available online at archive.org

My FISKE genealogy:

Generation 1:  John Fiske, son of John Fiske and Anne Lawter, baptized 20 March 1608 at St. James, South Elmham, Suffolk, England, and died 14 January 1677 at Chelmsford, Massachusetts;  married first to Ann Gipps; married second on 1 August 1673 in Chelmsford to Elizabeth Unknown, widow of Edmund Henchman. Six children with Ann.

Generation 2: Anna Fiske, born 15 January 1646 in Wenham, died 30 May 1681 in Reading, Massachusetts; married on 30 May 1677 in Chelmsford to John Brown, so of Nicholas Brown and Elizabeth Unknown.  He was born about 1634 in Malford, Worcestershire, England and died 12 March 1717 in Reading. Two children.

Generation 3:  Mary Brown m. Peter Emerson
Generation 4:  Brown Emerson m. Sarah Townsend
Generation 5: John Emerson m. Katherine Eaton
Generation 6: Romanus Emerson m. Jemima Burnham
Generation 7: George Emerson m. Mary Esther Younger
Generation 8: Mary Katharine Emerson m. George E. Batchelder
Generation 9: Carrie Maude Batchelder m. Joseph Elmer Allen
Generation 10: Stanley Elmer Allen m. Gertrude Matilda Hitchings (my grandparents)

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 Published under a Creative Commons License

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Surname Saturday ~ FISKE of Salem, Wenham and Chelmsford, Massachusetts", Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 23, 2016, (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/07/surname-saturday-fiske-of-salem-wenham.html: accessed [access date]).

Wednesday, July 20, 2016

Weathervane Wednesday ~ Vroom! Vroom!

It's Weathervane Wednesday!

I post a series of weather vane photographs every Wednesday.  This started with images of weathervanes from the Londonderry, New Hampshire area, but now I've found interesting weather vanes all across New England and across the globe.  Sometimes my weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are interesting.  Often my readers tip me off to some very unique or unusual weathervanes, too!  If you know a great weather vane near you, let me know if you'd like to have it featured on this blog.

Today's weather vane is from a reader, and it was photographed in New Hampshire.

Do you know the location of weathervane post #269?  Scroll down to find the answer.




Once again, genealogy blogger June Stearns Butka has found an interesting weather vane to feature for Weathervane Wednesday!  This time she found this whimsical chopper atop a residence in Atkinson, New Hampshire.  If you look closely you will see that this residence actually has two weathervanes.  The other one is an eagle above the main house.  The chopper cycle is above the garage.

I love this three dimensional chopper.  I've seen several motorcycle weather vanes and featured them here on my blog, but this is the first chopper.  It has a modified long front end, just like in the movie "Easy Rider".  My guess is that someone who lives here, or who lived here in the past, was a real enthusiast of motorcycles and perhaps they even owned a chopper! 

Thanks again, June!

June Stearns Butka's genealogy blog https://damegussie.wordpress.com/   

Click here to see the entire series of Weathervane Wednesday posts!

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Published under a Creative Commons License

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~ Vroom!  Vroom!", Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 20, 2016,  (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/07/weathervane-wednesday-vroom-vroom.html: accessed [access date]).


Tuesday, July 19, 2016

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Susan Julia (Morrison) Cutting (1807- 1831) of Derry, New Hampshire

This tombstone was photographed at the Forest Hill Cemetery in Derry, New Hampshire.



SUSAN JULIA
Wife of
MR. LEWIS CUTTING
Who died
Sep. 25, 1831
AEt. 24
A wife so true, there are but few,
And difficult to find;
A wife more just, and true to trust
There is not left behind.

B. DAY;  LOWELL.

Susan Julia Morrison was born in Derry; married in 1830 in Lowell, Massachusett to Lewis Cutting, son of John Cutting and Cynthia Warren  He was born 29 August 180 in Weston, Massachusetts and died 26 August 1889 in San Francisco, California.  Susan  was only 24 years old when she was buried here at Forest Hill Cemetery in Derry, and left one child, Lewis Morrison Cutting, who removed from Derry to Stockton, California.  Her husband was an overseer at the Hamilton Mills in Lowell, Massachusetts.   Descendants of Susan are eligible for membership in the Daughters of the American Revolution because her great great grandfather was John Morrison (1749 – 1840), present at the Battle of Bunker Hill under Captain George Reid and Colonel John Stark of Londonderry.  She was a descendant of John Morrison, an emigrant from Aberdeen, Scotland. 

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~npmelton/sjbcutt.htm  is a link to a biography of Lewis Morrison Cutting.

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Published under a Creative Commons License

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday ~  Susan Julia (Morrison) Cutting (1807- 1831) of Derry, New Hampshire", Nutfield Genealogy, posted  July 19, 2016,  (  http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/07/tombstone-tuesday-susan-julia-morrison.html: accessed [access date]). 

Monday, July 18, 2016

First grant of land in Nutfield, June 1719

A lot map of Nutfield from Willey's Book of Nutfield

Nutfield, June 1719

Laid out by order of the Commite of the above said town to William Humphery a Lott of Land in said Town Containing sixty acres and is bounded as followeth begining at a pine tree marked at the west corner at the hed of a Greit swamp from thence running east south east to a birtch tree marked standing in the swamp and so Continuing the same coarse to a stake standing by haverill line Joyning all the way upon Alexander Nickols lott from thence runin north as haverhil line runs unto a Chestnut tree marked standing by the afore said Haverhil line from thence runing south west to a greit dry chestnut tree marked and so continuing the sam line to a log bridg and ash tree Joyning John Bars lott and from south thence to the bounds first mentioned* to gather with an intrest in the common or undivided lands within said Township equall to oather Lotts in said Town.

                                            David Cargill
                                            James Gregg
                                            Samll Graves
                                            John mcneel
                                            Hew mnt Gumery
                                            John Goffe
                                                          Commite

Recorded this 10th of January: 1720/21
                                            Pr John Goffe Town Clerke

*Written over the last four words is the statement "Alexander Nikolses Lott"

transcribed from Early Records of the Town of Londonderry, Windham and Derry, N.H. 1719 - 1745, edited by George Waldo Brown, Manchester, NH: Manchester Historic Association, 1914.

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Published under a Creative Commons License

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "First grant of land in Nutfield, June 1719", Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 18, 2016,  ( http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/07/first-grant-of-land-in-nutfield-june.html: accessed [access date]).

Saturday, July 16, 2016

Surname Saturday ~ AYER of Salisbury and Haverhill, Massachusetts


AYER, EYRE, AYRES, and other variations (The Essex Antiquarian article listed below* has 29 spelling variations found in New England records).

My 10th great grandfather was John Ayer, whose arrival in New England is unknown despite the fact that several online and print sources claim he arrived on the Mary Anne in 1637 or the James in 1635.  He is not listed on the passenger lists of either ship.  John married a Hannah, maiden name unknown, around 1620 somewhere in England and they removed to Salisbury, Massachusetts about 1637.   He is on a list (undated) of men who were granted land in the first division of Colchester (renamed Salisbury).  His youngest child, Hannah (my 9th great grandmother) is the only Ayer child of John’s listed in the Salisbury vital records.  She was born 21 December 1644.

In 1645 John and his son, John Jr., owned land in Haverhill, Massachusetts in an area now known as Ayers Village.  They were both made Freemen at Ipswich on “4th day 9th month 1645” ( 4 October 1645). 

Some people claim that John’s wife Hannah was a Webb or an Everard.  There is no proof that she is a sister of John Everard alias Webb.  She is not listed in his will even though she was alive when the will was proved.  Her children were listed as cousins and as the children of John Ayer, so there is a possible kinship somewhere.   The Ayer family is not listed on the James, which brought John and Stephen Everard from England.  You can read more about John Everard alias Webb at the website http://www.webbdeiss.org/webb/johnwebb_aliasevered.html by Jonathan Webb Deiss.  This website has a great list of sources.

John and Hannah Ayer’s daughter married Nathan Parker and was living in Ipswich.  She was hanged for witch craft on 22 September 1692 during the Salem witch hysteria. 

There are several famous AYER descendants including Laura Ingalls Wilder and President Gerald R. Ford.  A locally famous descendant, James Cook Ayer (1818 – 1878) was the namesake of the town of Ayer, Massachusetts.  He was the brother of the wealthy industrialist Frederick Ayer (1822 – 1918) and grandfather of Beatrice Banning Ayer, wife of General George S. Patton. 

Some AYER resources:

Ayer is not listed in the Great Migration series, so we know that Anderson did not consider John Ayer as a passenger on the James.  Besides the vital records, court records, and the usual Genealogical Dictionary of New England by Savage or Pioneers of Massachusetts by Pope there are two other good sources for more information on the Ayer family.

* “The Ayer Genealogy”, in The Essex Antiquarian, October 1900, Volume IV, No. 10, pages 145 – 150 (available online at www.americanancestors.org for members of NEHGS).

The Ayer Genealogy “Descendants of the Immigrant John Ayer of Haverhill, Massachusetts” compiled by Janson Ayer  http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ayergenealogy/index.html

My AYER Genealogy:

Generation 1:  John Ayer, born about 1582 and died 31 March 1657 in Haverhill, Massachusetts; married about 1620 in England to Hannah Unknown. She was born about 1598 and died 8 October 1688 in Haverhill.  Nine children.

Generation 2: Hannah Ayer, born 21 December 1644 in Haverhill; married on 24 March 1662/3 in Haverhill to Stephen Webster as his first wife.  Six children.  He remarried to Judith, widow of William Broad. 

Generation 3: Abigail Webster m. Samuel Berry
Generation 4: Jotham Berry m. Mary Bates
Generation 5: Rachel Berry m. Ithamar Mace
Generation 6: Abigail Mace m. Simon Locke
Generation 7: Richard Locke m. Margaret Welch
Generation 8: Abigail M. Locke m. George E. Batchelder
Generation 9: George E. Batchelder m. Mary Katharine Emerson
Generation 10: Carrie Maude Batchelder m. Joseph Elmer Allen
Generation 11: Stanley Elmer Allen m. Gertrude Matilda Hitchings (my grandparents)

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Published under a Creative Commons License

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Surname Saturday ~ AYER of Salisbury and Haverhill, Massachusetts", Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 16, 2016,  (  http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/07/surname-saturday-ayer-of-salisbury-and.html:  accessed [access date]).

Friday, July 15, 2016

First Communion Photos from Spain over the years

During travel to visit Vincent's family in Spain I have seen many first communion ceremonies in the local churches.  The girls always wear the traditional white dresses and veils, but it is interesting to see that the boys dress all in variations of sailor outfits.

Here are some old photos from the Garcia family photo albums of these interesting first communion outfits.

1940s, this is Vincent's first cousin once removed


Early 1960s, Vincent's second cousin

Around 1970


Early 1990s


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Published under a Creative Commons License

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "First Communion Photos from Spain over the years", Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 15, 2016, (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/07/first-communion-photos-from-spain.html:  accessed [access date]).