Saturday, March 25, 2017

Surname Saturday ~ Thomas CLOUTMAN of Salem, Massachusetts


CLOUTMAN, CLOUGHTMAN, CLOUDMAN

Thomas Cloutman, my 8th great grandfather, is a mystery.  He is listed in The History of Salem, as a fisherman, and in Newfoundland with Nicholas Chatwell in 1681.  Some accounts say he was from Scotland, but I cannot find any proof. I don't know his parents, place of birth, birth date or death date.  He married Elizabeth Story on 26 July 1672 in Salem and had six children listed in the vital records.  I descend from his youngest son, Joseph Cloutman (1693 – 1743).  The eldest son, Edward (1673 – 1717), settled in New Hampshire, and middle son Thomas (b. 1682) removed to Marblehead.

Joseph Cloutman, my 7th great grandfather, died intestate, and his probate record was file on 28 March 1743.  I cannot find a death record for him.  His wife was Mary Peters, the daughter of Richard and Bethiah Peters of Salem.

My 6th great grandfather, Joseph Cloutman, was born abut 1720 and married Mary Webb in 1747.  They had four children.   They lived on Webb Street, which still exists in Salem, Massachusetts.  I descend from their oldest son, another Joseph Cloutman, born about 1748.  He married Hannah Becket and had seven children all born in Salem.  Their eldest daughter, Mary (1755 – 1853), my 4th great grandmother, married Abijah Hitchings, a Salem shipwright and carpenter.

My CLOUTMAN genealogy:

Generation 1:  Thomas Cloutman, born about 1645 probably in Scotland; married Elizabeth Story on 26 July 1672 in Salem, Massachusetts.  Six children.

Generation 2: Joseph Cloutman, born 19 September 1693 in Salem, died before 28 March 1743 in Salem; married on 14 November 1717 in Salem to Mary Peters, daughter of Richard Peters and Bethiah Unknown.  She was baptized in Salem on 12 September 1697.  One child [?]

Generation 3:  Joseph Cloutman, born about 1720, married on 16 June 1747 in Salem to Mary Webb, daughter of Jonathan Webb and Priscilla Bray.  She was born on 17 December 1724 in Salem and died 21 March 1790 in Salem.  Four children.

Generation 4: Joseph Cloutman, born about 1748 in Salem; married on 20 June 1770 in Salem to Hannah Becket, daughter of John Becket and Rebecca Beadle.  She was born 17 November 1751 in Salem, and died 18 August 1837 in Salem.  Seven children.

Generation 5: Mary Cloutman, born about 1775 in Salem, died 28 November 1853 in Salem; married on 21 December 1795 in Salem to Abijah Hitchings, son of Abijah Hitchings and Mary Gardner.  He was born about 1775 in Lynn and died 26 July 1868 in Salem.  Eleven children.

Generation 6:  Abijah Hitchings m. Eliza Ann Treadwell
Generation 7:  Abijah Franklin Hitchings m. Hannah Eliza Lewis
Generation 8:  Arthur Treadwell Hitchings m. Florence Etta Hoogerzeil
Generation 9:  Gertrude Matilda Hitchings m. Stanley Elmer Allen (my grandparents)

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Surname Saturday ~ Thomas CLOUTMAN of Salem, Massachusetts", Nutfield Genealogy, posted March 25, 2017,  (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/03/surname-saturday-thomas-cloutman-of.html: accessed [access date]). 

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Weathervane Wednesday ~ Seen at the Beach

Weathervane Wednesday is an on-going series of photographs I post every week.  I started out by publishing only weather vanes from the Londonderry area, but now I've been finding interesting weather vanes from all over New England.  Sometimes these weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are very unique.  Often, my readers tip me off to some very special and unusual weather vanes.  This weathervane was photographed and sent in to me by a blog reader.

Today's weather vane is from somewhere in Massachusetts.

Do you know the location of weather vane #303?  Scroll down to see the answer...



Again, reader and fellow genealogy blogger Sara Campbell has sent in another great weathervane photo.  Sara has a summer house in Eastham, Massachusetts (on Cape Cod).  She photographed this heron weathervane seen over the dunes from Campground Beach in Eastham.  This beach is on the bay side of Cape Cod, and is known for its warm, calm water compared to the beaches on the Atlantic side.  

Herons and other wading birds are popular weathervanes for beach houses.  I've seen quite a few in New Hampshire, and we only have 13 miles of coastline! 

Click here to see the entire series of Weathervane Wednesday posts!

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~ Seen at the Beach", Nutfield Genealogy, posted October 26, 2016,  (  http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/03/weathervane-wednesday-seen-at-beach.html: accessed [access date]).

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Rev. Thomas Weld and wife Elizabeth, Rev. Nathaniel Prentice, early ministers at Nashua, New Hampshire

This tombstone was photographed at the Old Dunstable Burying Ground in Nashua, New Hampshire



REV.
THOMAS WELD
BORN JUNE, 1653;
SETTLED AS
THE FIRST MINISTER
OF THE CHURCH IN 
DUNSTABLE, DEC 1685
PROBABLY MASSACRED
BY THE INDIANS
WHILE DEFENDING THE
SETTLEMENT
JUNE 7, 1702
AEt. 49



REV.
NATH'L PRENTICE
BORN DEC. 1698
SETTLED AS THE
SECOND MINISTER OF
DUNSTABLE 1720
DIED FEB. 25, 1737
AEt. 39


ELIZABETH
WIFE OF
THOMAS WELD
DIED JULY 29,  1687
AEt. 31



The Old Dunstable Burial Ground is located on the Daniel Webster Highway, not far from the Massachusetts border.  The proximity to Massachusetts makes this part of the tax free city of Nashua a busy shopping area.  This impressive tombstone is in the southwest corner of the cemetery, away from the busy traffic and shopping malls on Daniel Webster Highway.  It was erected by the city more than 250 years after the death of Rev. Thomas Weld, the first minister at Dunstable, which became the city of Nashua.

According to the book The History of Nashua, page 176 “That portion of the above inscription which refers to the Rev. Mr. Weld’s being massacred by the Indians is legendary, and probably mythical, as there was no Indian War waging in 1702, nor for several years before or after that date.  It should be corrected.”    The next paragraph also reads: “Mrs. Elizabeth Weld was a daughter of Hon. Edward Tyng.  Her mother’s native place was Dunstable, England, and our Dunstable received its name in compliment to her.”

Rev. Thomas Weld is my 2nd cousin 11 generations removed.  We are both descendants of Edmund Weld (1559 - 1608), a cloth merchant of Sudbury, Suffolk, England.  Edmund's son Joseph Weld (1598 - 1646) was my 11th great grandfather and a settler at Roxbury, Massachusetts.  Joseph's brother, Rev, Thomas Weld (1595 - 1660) was a minister in Roxbury.  His grandson is the Rev. Thomas Weld who became the first minister of the first church at Dunstable.  This congregation still exists as the First Church of Nashua.

Rev. Thomas Weld was born 12 June 1653 in Roxbury, and died 9 June 1702 in Dunstable.  He was married twice, first to Elizabeth Wilson on 9 November 1681.  She was the daughter of John Wilson and Sarah Hooker (daughter of Rev. Thomas Hooker of Hartford, Connecticut).  His second wife was Mary Savage, the daughter of Habijah Savage and Hannah Tyng.  You can see that the book The History of Nashua was wrong about the wife buried here in Nashua with Rev. Weld.

The inscription about the Indian massacre is certainly wrong.  A diary by John Marshall of Dunstable has an entry for 1702 "Mem. on the 11th day of June last, Mr. Thomas Weld, the pastor of the Church of Dunstable was buryed he was an eminent preacher of the word of god, a man well beloued and much Lamented by them that knew him.  His death is justly to be accounted a great Loss to the pouince in genrall and to the poor town of dunstable in particuler.

I previously blogged about Rev. Thomas Weld at this link:
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2010/12/first-church-of-nashua.html   

A PDF from the Nashua Public Library of The History of Nashua,  1897, epitaphs from the Old Dunstable Burying Ground are on pages 175 – 183. 


------------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday ~  Rev. Thomas Weld and wife Elizabeth, Rev. Nathaniel Prentice, early ministers at Nashua, New Hampshire", Nutfield Genealogy, posted March 21, 2017, (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/03/tombstone-tuesday-rev-thomas-weld-and.html: accessed [access date]). 

Monday, March 20, 2017

My Grandmother’s Diary ~ Part 15, June 26 – July 7, 1920

1929 Children sleeping on a fire escape
http://www.gettyimages.com/license/514697594

How did people survive sleeping during heat waves before air conditioning?  You can find out how my grandmother survived this in her school girl diary.

This is the 15th installment of my grandmother's diary from 1920.  Her name was Gertrude Hitchings (1905 - 2001), and she was living on Elliott Street in Beverly, Massachusetts.  Gertrude was a 14 year old school girl when she kept this little journal.  The book is a tiny 3", and every Monday I publish a new section, with transcriptions of the tiny handwriting.  You can read the first installment HERE.  I'll post more of this diary every week for Amanuensis Monday.



SAT.  JUNE 26, 1920
Got up at 7.30 had breakfast
went over Mrs Butler’s at 9. Came
home had dinner.  Ethel
came down. Rus and Mr. Lowell
over to supper.  Went up to the
store after supper.  Home all
evening went to bed at 10.30

SUNDAY 27
Got up at 9 had breakfast
went over Mrs. Butler’s at 10.15
came home stayed home all morning
after dinner Mildred and I
went to walk up reservoir
Home all evening went to
bed out in the tent at 9.30.

MONDAY 28
Got up at 6.45. Went
over Butler’s at 9.  Came
home at 1 home all
afternoon reading home
all evening went to bed
in the tent at 10.

NOTE:   In these diary entries Gertrude mentions sleeping in the tent.  This was another version of sleeping outside on a sleeping porch during the hot summer weather.  In the days before air conditioning some people used to set up sleeping pavilions in their back yard.  That must have been fun!

The reservoir she mentions here must be the Folly Hill Reservoir, which was not far from Elliott Street. She mentions her brother Russell, his wife Ethel, her sister Mildred, and the boarder Mr. Lowell who was usually there on weekends.

TUES. JUNE 29, 1920
Got up at 7.45 went
over Butler’s all morning
went downtown for Mrs. B.
Helen and baby up all day
Went up Danvers played tennis
after dinner.  home all evening
and went to bed at 10.30

WEDNESDAY 30
Got up at 7.15 went
over Butler’s all morning
came home at 12.45. After
dinner went to ride with
Ella ??? came home
got supper.  Went out with the
bunch around here.  Bed at 10.30

THURSDAY, JULY 1
Got up at 7.15 went over
Mrs. Butler’s at 8.30 and went
downtown.  Down Ella’s all
afternoon.  After supper went
to walk with the kids
went to bed at 10.15

NOTE:  Gertrude mentions her sister Helen, her friend Ella, and going to work for Mrs. Butler (housework?). 




FRI. JULY 2, 1920
Got up at 7.15 went over
Butler’s all morning.  After
dinner went downtown with
Ida & Eunice got a pair of shoes
Came home at 5. After supper
Went riding with Ella and
Gladys.  Went to bed at 10.

SATURDAY 3
Got up at 7.30 went over to
Mrs. Butler’s all morning
worked home all afternoon
rained hard all day Mr.
Lowell over In the afternoon.
Stayed home all evening and
Read went to bed at 9.30

SUNDAY 4
Got up at 8.30 had break
fast at 9. Home all the morn
ing.  After dinner went to
walk came home at 5.
Stayed up all night watched
Bonfire went to bed at 1 A.M.

NOTE:  Gertrude mentions her friends Ida, Gladys and Ella; and her sister Eunice.  She mentions the boarder Mr. Lowell and working at Mrs. Butler’s house.  On the 4th of July she went to see a bonfire until well after midnight! I wonder if she slept out in the tent that night? 

MON. JULY 5, 1920
Got up at 8.30 went over
to Butler’s home all morning
Ellsworth, Helen & baby up Mr. Lowell
too.  After dinner went
down to Ella’s.  After supper
went to ride.  Came home watched
fireworks went to bed at 10.45

TUESDAY 6
Got up at 7.30 over Mrs.
Butler’s all the morning
Went down Ella’s after dinner
and then went down
town.  After supper went
down Ella’s a while, we
slept in the tent bed at 9.15

WEDNESDAY 7
Got up at 5 had break
fast at 6.45.  Went on the
Sunday school picnic up
to Idlewood had a
swell time home at 8.
Went to bed at 10.

NOTE:   The firework display was on the night after the 4th of July.  She mentions her sister Helen, brother-in-law Ellsworth, friend Ella, and the boarder Mr. Lowell.   Her Sunday school picnic was at Idlewood Park in Wenham where she “had a swell time”.  Gertrude hardly ever mentions church or Sunday school in her diary, but it was an important part of her life growing up.

Click here for another diary entry about Idlewood Park:

-------------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "My Grandmother’s Diary ~ Part 15, June 26 – July 7, 1920", Nutfield Genealogy, posted March 20, 2017, ( http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/03/my-grandmothers-diary-part-15-june-26.html: accessed [access date]). 

Saturday, March 18, 2017

Surname Saturday ~ WEBB of Salem

Salem, 1700

WEBB

Jonathan Webb (1690 – 1765), my 7th great grandfather, is another brickwall ancestor.  There are many possible WEBB families in the area from whom he might descend.  Several online trees have him as the son of John Webb and Susannah Cunliffe of Northampton, Massachusetts, which is very far from Salem, Massachusetts where Jonathan lived and died.  There were several possible Webbs right in Salem including a John Webb who bought land in 1669.  But now his ancestry is a mystery.

Jonathan Webb was a “coaster”, which meant he sailed fishing small boats up and down the coast of Massachusetts and New England.  He owned a house at the corner of Derby and Hardy Streets in Salem.  I find this amazing because the family continued to live in this neighborhood until my great grandfather was born!  He was also a deacon at the East Society church, where Rev. William Bentley would have his famous diary a few generations later.  The East Society church stood on Essex Street. 

His daughter, Mary (1724 – 1790), is my 6th great grandmother.  She married Joseph Cloutman and they lived on Webb Street, named after her father’s land.  Webb Street is still in existence in Salem,  at the end of Essex Street, near Collins Cove.   There are several streets in this area named after my ancestors- Webb, Boardman, Becket,  Lemon, and Beadle Lane which is now called Pleasant Street in Salem.

My sources for this information on Jonathan Webb come from The Essex Antiquarian, Volume 23, page 71 (property information), The Essex County Registry of Deeds, book 115, leaf 76, and the book The Driver Family: A genealogical memoir of the descendants of Robert and Phebe Driver of Lynn, Mass. , by Harriet Ruth (Waters) Cooke, 1889 (which is also available online at archive.org and at Google Book search).

My WEBB genealogy:

Generation 1:   Jonathan Webb, born about 1690, died before 1765; married on 23 March 1714 in Salem, Massachusetts to Priscilla Bray, daughter of Robert Bray and Christian Collins.  She was born 11 March 1690 in Salem and died after 4 Feb 1767.  Nine children.

Generation 2:  Mary Webb, born 17 December 1724 in Salem, died 21 March 1790 in Salem; married on 16 June 1747 in Salem to Joseph Cloutman, son of Joseph Cloutman and Mary Peters. He was born about 1720.  Four children.

Generation 3:  Joseph Cloutman m. Hannah Becket
Generation 4:  Mary Cloutman m. Abijah Hitchings
Generation 5:  Abijah Hitchings m. Eliza Ann Treadwell
Generation 6:  Abijah Franklin Hitchings m. Hannah Eliza Lewis
Generation 7:  Arthur Treadwell Hitchings m. Florence Etta Hoogerzeil
Generation 8:  Gertrude Matilda Hitchings m. Stanley Elmer Allen (my grandparents)


------------------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Surname Saturday ~ WEBB of Salem", Nutfield Genealogy, posted April 8, 2017, (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/03/surname-saturday-webb-of-salem.html: accessed [access date]). 

Surname Saturday ~ RANDALL of Boston, Another Brickwall Ancestor


I have two RANDALL lines, that seem to be completely unrelated. In 2015 I wrote a Surname Saturday post on Richard Randall (1633 – 1713) of Saco, Maine.  This second lineage starts with a possible 7th great grandfather,  Stephen Randall, a mariner who died in Boston before 18 May 1742.  He is a mystery and a brickwall since I do not know his origins or his parents’ names.  Nor do I know his birth date.

The first and earliest record I found for Stephen Randall was that he served as a private in the Colonial Wars from 22 November 1724 to 22 May 1725, 26 months, in Colonel Thomas Westbrook’s Company.  Next to his name it reads “Of Boston”.  The next record I found for Stephen Randall was a probate record granting his widow, Sarah, guardianship of his son “Andros a. about 4 in right of his father Stephen Randall of Boston late deceased, mariner, May 18, 1742”.   Sadly, just a few years later a man named John Hill was made guardian for “Andrus Randall, a. abt. 11, son of Stephen, mariner & Sarah, both deceased, Mar. 1749/50”.  I have not been able to find a death record for Stephen or Sarah, the parents.

In the Thwing Collection, Inhabitants and Estates of the Town of Boston, 1630 – 1822 there is a listing for Stephen Randall, who married Sarah Cannon on 16 January 1729.  Their children are listed as:

1. Abigail, born 20 March 1730
2. Elizabeth, born 7 January 1732/3
3. Mary, born 10 January 1734/5
4. Stephen, born 5 December 1736
5. Andros, born 20 February 1739

[Note that this record does NOT name a daughter named Sarah Randall.  In the Boston Births 1700 – 1809 there is a “Sarah Randall, daughter of Stephen and Sarah Randall, born 16 October 1729", so we know that there is a Sarah in this family group.  Another good clue is that a man named William Randall married Elizabeth Hill in Boston on 10 December 1691 [Torrey’s Marriages, Volume II, page 1247].  Could this be a relative to the mysterious John Hill who was named guardian to Andros Randall?]

In the Boston Marriages 1700 – 1809 there is a record:  “Benjamin Gardner to Sarah Kendall, Dec. 1, 1751 West Church”   Benjamin Gardner and his first wife Sarah Randall are my 6th great grandparents.  He was a Boston ropemaker who removed to Salem around the time of the Revolutionary War.  The Boston Marriages  record is a transcription of church records, famous for mistakes.  Could Sarah Kendall be a Sarah Randall?   Sarah (Randall/Kendall) Gardner died in 1781 in Salem, Massachusetts, the mother to three children:  Mary (my 5th great grandmother), Benjamin b. 1753, and Sarah b. 1755. 

Does anyone know the story behind this RANDALL / KENDALL / GARDNER mystery?  Please leave a comment below or email vrojomit@gmail.com

Thank you!


My previous blog post on Richard Randall of Saco, Maine:

My RANDALL? genealogy:

Generation 1:  Sarah (possible surname RANDALL or KENDALL) possibly born 16 October 1729 in Boston, daughter of Stephen Randall and Sarah Cannon, died in 1781 in Salem, Massachusetts; married on 10 October 1751 at the West Church in Boston to Benjamin Gardner.  He was born about 1720 in Boston and died 7 June 1797 in Salem.  Three children.

Generation 2:  Mary Gardner; married 24 June 1775 in Lynn, Massachusetts to Abijah Hitchings.  He was born 18 January 1753 in Lynn and died 27 March 1826 in Salem.  Four children.

Generation 3:  Abijah Hitchings m. Mary Cloutman

Generation 4:  Abijah Hitchings m. Eliza Ann Treadwell

Generation 5: Abijah Franklin Hitchings m. Hannah Eliza Lewis

Generation 6: Arthur Treadwell Hitchings m. Florence Etta Hoogerzeil

Generation 7: Gertrude Matilda Hitchings m. Stanley Elmer Allen (my grandparents)


----------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Surname Saturday ~ RANDALL of Boston, Another Brickwall Ancestor", Nutfield Genealogy, posted March 18, 2017, (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/03/surname-saturday-randall-of-boston.html: accessed [access date]).

Friday, March 17, 2017

Uncle Don and Uncle Buddy

This photograph was taken at 10 Roosevelt Avenue in Hamilton, Massachusetts in the late 1930s.  It looks like it was winter because they are all bundled up in snowsuits and hats.



These are two of my mother's five brothers, Donald Franklin and Joseph Gilman Allen.  They are the two children born just before Mom out of the seven children in the Allen family.  No one ever called Joseph by his given name, he was always known as Buddy.  Both these uncles are still living in Massachusetts.  This photo is from my grandmother's album, and that is her handwriting on the margin.  She was always good about labeling her family photographs.  Well... most of them! 

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Uncle Donnie and Uncle Buddy", Nutfield Genealogy, posted March 17, 2017,  (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/03/uncle-don-and-uncle-buddy.html: accessed [access date]). 

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Weathervane Wednesday ~ A Fancy Sailing Ship

Weathervane Wednesday is an on-going series of photographs I post weekly.  I started out by publishing only weather vanes from the Londonderry area, but now I've been finding interesting weather vanes from all over New England.  Sometimes these weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are very unique.  Often, my readers tip me off to some very special and unusual weather vanes.

Today's weather vane was photographed in Massachusetts.

Do you know the location of weather vane #302?  Scroll down to see the answer...





Today's weathervane was photographed in Manchester-by-the-Sea, Massachusetts.  It is on a large cupola above the public library.  The library is located next door to the First Parish Church, which has a beautiful old weathercock I blogged about in 2014.  From this angle you can see both weathervanes!

We have photographed many sailing ship weathervanes in New England, but this is one of the most fanciful and imaginative.  The sails are decorated with stars, and the masts are decorated with fluttering banners.  It is only a two-dimensional weather vane, but it is whimsical and fun.  This library is located just a few steps from the harbor, and Manchester-by-the-Sea was the home of many sea captains and mariners over the years.  A sailing ship is the perfect choice for this location.  There are no cardinal points on this weather vane.

The stone library was designed by Charles F. McKim, a famous architect of many New England and American landmarks, including the Boston Public Library and New York's Penn Station.  The stained glass windows were designed by Tiffany.  You can read all about the history of this little gem of a library in the link below.

Manchester-by-the-Sea Public Library website:  http://www.manchesterpl.org/

First Parish Church, Manchester-by-the-Sea weathervane blog post:  https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/07/weathervane-wednesday-very-old.html  


Click here to see the entire series of Weathervane Wednesday posts!  


-----------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo,  "Weathervane Wednesday ~ A Fancy Sailing Ship", Nutfield Genealogy, posted March 15, 2017, (  http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/03/weathervane-wednesday-fancy-sailing-ship.html:  accessed [access date]).