Saturday, November 17, 2018

Surname Saturday ~ WEEKS of Greenland, New Hampshire

The Weeks Brick House
built circa 1710 by Samuel Weeks, my 9th great uncle


WEEKS / WEEKES /  WICKES

Much of the information about my 9th great grandfather, Leonard Weeks (1633 – 1707) is from an 1889 book.  Not many people realize that this information has been researched, updated, and published at the journal of the New Hampshire Society of Genealogists.  See below for the information on this book and the journal article. There is also an active Weeks family association that maintains updates on the family genealogy (see below for links to the family association webpage.)

Leonard Weeks is of unknown origins, but he was born about 1633, probably in England, and first appears a Maine record as a witness in 1655.  By 29 June 1656 he received his first grant of land in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.  In 1660 he received more acreage, and by February 1660/61 he had settled in what is now the town of Greenland, on the Winnicut River
. 
My ancestor married three times.  First to a daughter of Deacon Samuel Haines, then to Mary Redman, the daughter of John Redman, and third to a woman known only as “Elizabeth”.  He had eight children with Mary Redman, my 9th great grandmother. 

In 1655 the court found Leonard Weeks guilty of swearing and fined him 10 shillings plus court fees of 3 shillings.  However, he must have been respected in the community because the very next year he was elected selectman, and later as the constable and as the sheriff.  His seat in the church at Portsmouth was “No. 4 in front of the pulpit”. 

I descend from his son Joshua Weeks (1674 – 1758) who married Comfort Hubbard.  My 8th great grandparents had nine children and lived in Greenland.  Comfort was the sister of Thomas Hubbard, a wealthy resident of Boston and treasurer of Harvard College.  They lived on the “Bay Side” of Greenland. Joshua was the colonel of the local militia, and was also a justice of the peace.  
In the next generation I descend from the eldest daughter, Mary Weeks (about 1700 – 1765) who married Jonathan Chesley, and they resided in nearby Durham, New Hampshire.

The Weeks Brick House was built by Samuel Weeks, son of Leonard Weeks and brother of Joshua, in 1710 in Greenland, New Hampshire is operated by the Weeks family association, as a organizational member of Historic New England.  This is one of the earliest brick homes build in New England.  It is open for tours by appointment 603-436-8147. See the website www.weeksbrickhouse.org    The family association has an annual family reunion every September.  The WEEKS DNA project is at this link:  https://www.familytreedna.com/groups/weeks-weekes-wicks/about  

Some WEEKS resources:

Leonard Weeks, of Greenland, N. H. & Descendants, 1639 – 1888, by Jacob Chapman, 1889 (available online at HathiTrust, Archive.org, and at Ancestry).

“New Thoughts on the Family of Leonard Weeks”, by Janet Ireland Delorey and Melinda Lutz Sanborn, New Hampshire Genealogical Record,  Vol. 19, Numbers 2 and 3, April and August 2002.

The Leonard Weeks and Descendants in America, a family association  www.weeksbrickhouse.org  and their Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/WeeksBrickHouse/  

My WEEKS genealogy:

Generation 1:  Leonard Weeks, born about 1633 in England; died about 1707 in Greenland, New Hampshire; married about 1667 to Mary Redman, his second wife, daughter of John Redman and Margaret Knight.  She was born 15 December 1649 and died about 1694.  Eight children. 

Generation 2: Joshua Weeks, born 30 June 1674 in Greenland, and died 13 June 1758 in Greenland; married on 7 November 1699 in Boston, Massachusetts to Comfort Hubbard, daughter of Richard Hubbard and Martha Allen.  She was born 17 January 1682 and died 20 March 1756.  Nine children.

Generation 3:  Mary Weeks, born about 1700 in Greenland, died about July 1765; married on 17 November 1720 in Greenland to Jonathan Chesley, son of Phillip Chesley and Sarah Rollins.  Three children.

Generation 4:  Comfort Chesley m. Stephen Perkins
Generation 5:  Mary Perkins m. Nathaniel Batchelder
Generation 6:  Jonathan Batchelder m. Nancy Thompson
Generation 7:  George E. Batchelder m. Abigail M. Locke
Generation 8:  George E. Batchelder m. Mary Katharine Emerson
Generation 9:  Carrie Maude Batchelder m. Joseph Elmer Allen
Generation 10:  Stanley Elmer Allen m. Gertrude Matilda Hitchings (my grandparents)

--------------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Surname Saturday ~ WEEKS of Greenland, New Hampshire", Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 17, 2018, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/11/surname-saturday-weeks-of-greenland-new.html: accessed [access date]). 

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Weathervane Wednesday ~ Two Mermaids by the Sea

I post another in a series of weather vane photographs every Wednesday.  This started with images of weathervanes from the Londonderry, New Hampshire area, but now I've found interesting weather vanes all across New England and across the globe.  Sometimes my weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are interesting.  Often my readers tip me off to some very unique or unusual weathervanes, too!  If you know a great weather vane near you, let me know if you'd like to have it featured on this blog.

Today's weather vanes were photographed in New Hampshire.

Do you know the location of the two weathervanes in post #389?  Scroll down to find the answer.

Weathervane  #1





Weathervane #2




These two mermaid weathervanes were spotted while driving down Ocean Drive in Seabrook, New Hampshire.  This neighborhood is known as the Beach Village District, right on the ocean.  The first mermaid was three dimensional with a tail with patterned scales, and a detailed face and hands.  The second mermaid is two dimensional, without any details.  Both weathervanes are small, but the houses are also small and the street is narrow.  While you are driving slowly you can take the time to stop and admire these two weathervanes on this street.  Both are within a block or two of each other.

According to the Seabrook town records, the Beach Village boundaries include all the property on both sides of Route 1A between the Massachusetts state line on the south and the Hampton town line line to the north. The Beach Village District of Seabrook was established in 1947.


A 2012 newspaper article about the Seabrook Beach Village:
http://www.eagletribune.com/news/enjoy-waterfront-living-in-seabrook-beach-village/article_7d6b2393-e686-59b8-b645-d17057f98f1e.html 


Click here to see the entire collection of Weathervane Wednesday posts!

-------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~ Two Mermaids by the Sea", Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 14, 2018, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/11/weathervane-wednesday-two-mermaids-by.html: accessed [access date]).

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Tombstone Tuesday ~ James Cochran, poetic hero, buried 1795 in Derry's Forest Hill Cemetery

This tombstone was photographed at the Forest Hill Cemetery behind the First Parish Meetinghouse in East Derry, New Hampshire.  At the time of the burial, this land was in the town of Londonderry.


IN
Memory of
Mr. James Cochran
who died
Febr. ye 17th 1705,
in ye 85th year
of his age.

Reader, behold as you pass by
As you are also once was I.
As I am now, you must be
Prepare for death & follow me.

Last month I posted a poem written by Windham, New Hampshire's poet "The Rustic Bard", Robert Dinsmoor.  This poem was "Jamie Cochran: The Indian Captive" based on a true incident that took place in 1725 near the Casco Bay in the state of Maine.  The hero of this poem was a teenaged boy, Jamie Cochran, born in Northern Ireland, who survived being captured by Indians. He lived with his family near the present day Brunswick, Maine, but removed to Suncook, New Hampshire when his father left Maine, and eventually settled in the Scots Irish town of Londonderry.  

You can read this post and poem at this link (along with some genealogical information):



-------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday ~  James Cochran, poetic hero, buried 1795 in Derry's Forest Hill Cemetery", Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 13, 2018, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/11/tombstone-tuesday-james-cochran-poetic.html: accessed [access date]). 

Sunday, November 11, 2018

Volunteer Transcriptions of Honor Rolls for Veteran's Day 2018

Military Honor Rolls in front of the library
at Dunbarton, New Hampshire

The Honor Roll project collects transcriptions of the names of the veterans on military honor rolls seen in parks, schools, public buildings, books and other places all over the USA and abroad.  You can read the complete list at this link:

https://honorrollproject.weebyly.com 


Twice a year, for Memorial Day and Veteran’s Day, genealogy bloggers photograph and transcribe these honor rolls, and publish them on the internet.   The act of transcribing these names makes them available to be found by search engines such as Google, Mocavo and others.  Family members searching for genealogical or military information on relatives, ancestors or friends will be able to see the honor rolls, read the names, and learn about their family’s military history.

It is a simple, easy project.  However, it brings unexpected joy to searchers who did not know their ancestors were in the military, or did not know the specific military history, or sometimes they did not even know the town where their ancestors lived.  Seeing their family member’s name on an honor roll can be the beginning of finding more genealogy data, military records and historical information.

Here are this year’s contributions from the USA and Canada:


Connecticut

Newtown, Part 1, War of 1812,  by "Benjamin McClure" Marian Burk Wood
https://climbingmyfamilytree.blogspot.com/2018/05/honor-roll-project-part-1-newtown.html 

Newtown, Part 2, 1944 - 1971, by "Benjamin McClure" Marian Burk Wood
https://climbingmyfamilytree.blogspot.com/2018/05/honor-roll-project-part-2-newtown-ct.html

Newtown, Part 3, Gulf War and Civil War, by "Benjamin McClure" Marian Burk Wood
https://climbingmyfamilytree.blogspot.com/2018/05/honor-roll-project-part-3-newtown-ct.html   

Windsor, World War I, by Jenny Hawran

Windsor Grace Episcopal Church, World War I, by Jenny Hawran

Massachusetts

Bridgewater, Central Square, WWI by David J. McRae

Charlemont, Civil War, WW1, WWII, Korea, Vietnam, and Service between 1950 – 1999, by Schalene Dagutis

Raynham, Korea and Vietnam, by David J. McRae
https://thedeadwereoncesomeonetoo.blogspot.com/2018/10/honor-roll-project-2018-bruce-e.html 

New Hampshire

WWI Military: Heroes of Andover by Janice Webster Brown
http://www.cowhampshireblog.com/2018/09/14/new-hampshire-wwi-military-heroes-of-andover/

WWI Military: Heroes of Antrim by Janice Webster Brown
http://www.cowhampshireblog.com/2018/06/29/new-hampshire-wwi-military-heroes-of-antrim/

WWI Military: Heroes of Bath by Janice Webster Brown
http://www.cowhampshireblog.com/2018/08/18/new-hampshire-wwi-military-heroes-of-bath/

WWI Military: Heroes of Belmont by Janice Webster Brown
http://www.cowhampshireblog.com/2018/10/04/new-hampshire-wwi-military-heroes-of-belmont/


WWI Military:  Heroes of Benton
 
WWI Military: Heroes of Bethlehem by Janice Webster Brown
http://www.cowhampshireblog.com/2018/08/26/new-hampshire-wwi-military-heroes-of-bethlehem/

WWI Military: Heroes of Bristol by Janice Webster Brown
http://www.cowhampshireblog.com/2018/08/16/new-hampshire-wwi-military-bristol/


WWI Military: Heroes of Charlestown by Janice Webster Brown


WWI Military: Heroes of Chesterfield by Janice Webster Brown
http://www.cowhampshireblog.com/2018/09/24/new-hampshire-wwi-military-heroes-of-chesterfield/

WWI Military: Heroes of Concord by Janice Webster Brown
http://www.cowhampshireblog.com/2018/07/14/world-war-i-military-heroes-of-concord/

WWI Military: Heroes of Derry by Janice Webster Brown
http://www.cowhampshireblog.com/2018/07/06/new-hampshire-wwi-military-heroes-of-derry/

WWI: Heroes of Dublin by Janice Webster Brown
http://www.cowhampshireblog.com/2018/08/11/new-hampshire-in-wwi-heroes-of-dublin/  

Dunbarton, WW1, WWII, Korea and Vietnam by Heather Wilkinson Rojo
 

WWI Military: Heroes of Enfield by Janice Webster Brown
http://www.cowhampshireblog.com/2018/09/30/new-hampshire-wwi-military-heroes-of-enfield/

WWI Military: Heroes of Francestown by Janice Webster Brown
http://www.cowhampshireblog.com/2018/08/30/new-hampshire-wwi-military-heroes-of-francestown/

WWI Military: Heroes of Greenville by Janice Webster Brown
http://www.cowhampshireblog.com/2018/06/09/new-hampshire-wwi-military-heroes-of-greenville/
WWI Military:  Heroes of Groton by Janice Webster Brown
 
WWI Military:  Heroes of Holderness by Janice Webster Brown
  

WWI Military: Heroes of Lincoln by Janice Webster Brown
http://www.cowhampshireblog.com/2018/10/06/new-hampshire-wwi-military-heroes-of-lincoln/

WWI Military: Heroes of Lisbon by Janice Webster Brown
http://www.cowhampshireblog.com/2018/07/16/new-hampshire-wwi-military-heroes-of-lisbon/
 
WWI Military:  Heroes of Moultonborough by Janice Webster Brown
 
WWI Military: Heroes of Newport by Janice Webster Brown
http://www.cowhampshireblog.com/2018/06/24/new-hampshire-wwi-military-heroes-of-newport/


WWI Military:  Heroes of New Ipswich
 
WWI Military: Heroes of Peterborough by Janice Webster Brown
http://www.cowhampshireblog.com/2018/08/09/new-hampshire-wwi-military-heroes-of-peterborough/

WWI Military: Heroes of Pittsburg by Janice Webster Brown
http://www.cowhampshireblog.com/2018/05/30/new-hampshire-wwi-military-heroes-of-pittsburg/

WWI Military: Heroes of Pittsfield by Janice Webster Brown
http://www.cowhampshireblog.com/2018/08/07/new-hampshire-wwi-military-heroes-of-pittsfield/

WWI Military: Heroes of Plymouth and Rumney by Janice Webster Brown
http://www.cowhampshireblog.com/2018/09/16/new-hampshire-wwi-military-heroes-of-plymouth-and-rumney/

WWI: Heroes of Raymond by Janice Webster Brown
http://www.cowhampshireblog.com/2018/09/08/new-hampshire-in-wwi-heroes-of-raymond/


WWI Military: Heroes of Stratford by Janice Webster Brown



WWI Military: Heroes of Westmoreland by Janice Webster Brown


WWI Military:  Heroes of Wolfeboro
 
New Jersey

Red Bank, WWI and Spanish-American, by Amanda Pape
  
New York

Au Sable Forks, Au Sable Valley Memorial Park, WW1, WW2, Koriea, Vietnam, Lebanon, by Schalene Dagutis

Claverack, WW1 and WWII by Schalene Dagutis

Lake George, Shepherd Park, Civil War, WW1, WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Gulf Wars, by Schalene Dagutis

Pleasantville, WW1, by "Benjamin McClure" Marian Burk Wood
https://climbingmyfamilytree.blogspot.com/2018/09/honor-roll-project-wwi-service-in.html 

Rexford, Saratoga County, Garnsey Park, WWII by Schalene Dagutis

Schaghticoke, WW1, by Schalene Dagutis

Stillwater, WW1, by Schalene Dagutis


North Carolina

Chapel Hill, War of 1812, Civil War, WW1, WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Persian Gulf, Bosnia, Afghanistan, and Iraq, by Jamie Gates
https://applegategenealogy.wordpress.com/2018/11/12/carolina-alumni-lost-in-military-service/   


Vermont

Alburgh, WW1 and WWII, by Schalene Dagutis

Rutland, Main Street Park, WW1, by Schalene Dagutis

Fair Haven, WW1, WWII, Korea, Vietnam, by Schalene Dagutis


Canada
North Hatley, Stanstead County, Quebec by Anna Matthews


Thank you to all the volunteers who photographed and transcribed these honor rolls.  Some of you transcribed thousands and thousands of names!

Saturday, November 10, 2018

Surname Saturday ~ CHESLEY of Oyster River (Dover), New Hampshire



CHESLEY / CHESSLEY / CHESLIE

The first record I can find of my 9th great grandfather, Phillip Chesley, is when he witnessed a deed from Rev. Thomas Larkahm to William Waldron on 13 September 1642.  There are some online sources that say he arrived at the Oyster River Plantation at age 15 in 1633, but I have not found any source for that.  There are also some who say he was from the Isle of Jersey, son of Thomas Chesley and Margaret Rogers, but I have not seen any proof of his origins.

Phillip Chesley’s first wife was Elizabeth Leighton, with whom he had two sons.  Elizabeth and Phillip signed a deed for a house lot on Dover Neck.  Some time after this he remarried to a woman named Joan or Joanna.  On 12 August 1663 he and Joan deed his land and house to his sons, keeping only one room in the house for himself.  He had three daughters with his second wife.

Life was difficult on the New Hampshire seacoast. It was on the border of the frontier with French Canada.  Most of the settlers were involved with logging and lumber which was dangerous work.  In 1657 he was on the jury that investigated a drowning of a logger.   In 1660 he was the local constable when Thomas Canyda was killed by a falling tree.   He was present at the coroner’s inquest of an Alexander McDaniel who drowned in the Piscataqua River in 1663.  Chelsley was chosen to lay out the road from Oyster River to Cochecho with Patrick Jamison in 1664.

My ancestor appears to have been a drunk and a belligerent neighbor.  He was also the Oyster River constable for a time, which seems incongruous. Because of his behavior, the court records are full of mentions of Phillip Chesley.  Otherwise, I wouldn’t know much about his life in early New Hampshire. He appeared in court with Stephen Jones in 1668 “upon suspicion of having a hand in ye untimely death of Edmond Green blacksmith” [NH Provincial Deeds, 2: 150b, 151a].  In April 1661 there was a bond issued to Phillip Chesley to keep the peace, especially towards his wife, and to appear in court in Dover to answer the complaint of his wife, Joan. 

In June of the same year two witnesses claimed Chesley called Edward Colcord “Rogue & Rascall, & that he deserved to be sold to the Berbadoes or Virginia, & he would doe it if he Could.”   In another slander case Mr. Samuel Hall claimed that Chelsey was “Cozening and cheating saying yt he was a Knave & yt he had Cozened & cheated him the sd Chesley of 10 pounds or more wch was a Just debt whereby the sd Hall is damnified in his Credit 500 pounds.”  The jury found him guilty but only chared him 50 shillings in damages and 21 shillings court costs.  [New Hampshire Court Records 1640 – 1692, Court Papers 1652 – 1668, in the New Hampshire State Papers Series, 40 (State of New Hampshire, 1943), 172, 474 – 7, and Court Papers, 1: 69, 89, 93, 95, 115 – 123.]  This case is explained in great detail in Diane Rapapport’s 2007 book The Naked Quaker: True Crimes and Controversies from the Courts of Colonial New England, on pages 83 – 88 in a sketch she calls “Chesley and the Cheating Knave”. 

In the second generation I descend from his son, Phillip Chesley, Jr.  His older brother, Thomas Chesley, was killed in an Indian massacre near Johnson’s Creek on 15 November 1697, leaving seven children and a widow.  Phillip, Jr. married Sarah Rollins and had six children.

In the third generation I descend from Philip’s youngest son, Jonathan.  He lived in Greenland, and was a representative to the General Court in 1745.  He married Mary Weeks and had three children.  I descend from their daughter Comfort Chesley, my 7th great grandfather, who married Stephen Perkins of Wells, Maine, and they had twelve children born in Wells and in the part of Canterbury, New Hampshire that became the town of Loudon.  

Some other Chesley resources:
History of Durham, New Hampshire, Volume 1, by Everett Schermerhorn Stackpole, 1913.
Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire, by Charles Thornton Libby, Walter Goodwin Davis and Sybil Noyes, 1928.
Batchelder Genealogy, by Frederick Clifton Pierce, 1898

My CHESLEY genealogy:
Generation 1:  Phillip Chesley, born about 1606 and died after 30 April 1685 at Oyster River, New Hampshire; married first to Elizabeth Leighton, daughter of Thomas Leighton and Joanna Sisbee.  She was born about 1625 in Dover, New Hampshire; married second to Joan Unknown.  Two sons with the first wife, three daughters with the second wife.

Generation 2:  Phillip Chesley, born about 1646 in Oyster River, and died 18 December 1695 at Oyster River; married about 1675 to Sarah Rollins, daughter of James Rollins and Hannah Fry.  Six children.

Generation 3:  Jonathan Chesley, died about 1785; married on 17 November 1720 in Greenland to Mary Weeks, daughter of Joshua Weeks and Comfort Hubbard.  She was born about 1700 in Greenland and died about 1755. Three children.

Generation 4:  Comfort Chesley, born about 1735 and died 12 February 1818; married to Stephen Perkins, son of Jacob Perkins and Anna Littlefield.  He was born about 1736 in Wells, Maine and died 13 May 1818 in Loudon, New Hampshire.  Twelve children.
Generation 5:  Mary Perkins m. Nathaniel Batchelder
Generation 6:  Jonathan Batchelder m. Nancy Thompson
Generation 7:  George E. Batchelder m. Abigail M. Locke
Generation 8: George E. Batchelder m. Mary Katharine Emerson
Generation 9: Carrie Maude Batchelder m. Joseph Elmer Allen
Generation 10:  Stanley Elmer Allen m. Gertrude Matilda Hitchings

-----------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, “CHESLEY of Oyster River (Dover), New Hampshire”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 10, 2018, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/11/surname-saturday-chesley-of-oyster.html: accessed [access date]). 

Friday, November 9, 2018

Dunbarton, New Hampshire Military Honor Rolls

Dunbarton, New Hampshire is a small town in Merrimack County of about 2,700 people.  It is famous for being the birthplace of Molly Stark, and the home of General Stark and his descendants.  Along the General Stark Scenic By-Way you pass right through the center of town, and the public library.  The former town hall building is now the public library, and the town offices moved to a new building next door. In front of this building are the Dunbarton military honor rolls.




THIS TABLET ERECTED
BY
THE TOWN OF DUNBARTON
IN HONOR
OF
THE MEN WHO SERVED THEIR COUNTRY
IN THE 
WORLD WAR
OLIVER J. BUNTEN
WILLIAM B. BURNHAM
BRADFORD W. BURNHAM
CARROLL H. CROSBY
HAROLD J. DICKEY
JOHN L. FITTS
WALTER GOULD
C. ROSS GOURLEY
JOHN B. IRELAND
JOSEPH LEPAGE
HAROLD B. LAKEMAN
FRANK J. MURRAY
WILLIAM D. MURRAY
ERNEST C. MURPHY
HENRY SEVERANCE
ERNEST A. TUCKER
LEON S. TUCKER
RALPH C. WALKER
"GREATER LOVE HATH NO MAN THAN THIS,
THAT A MAN LAY DOWN HIS LIFE FOR HIS FRIENDS"


DEC. 2, 1941       WWII        DEC. 31, 1946



AUDETTE, BERTHA
BALLAM, EDWARD P.
BARTLETT, CHARLES S. JR
BERNATAS, ADAM
BERNATAS, ALGERT
BERNATAS, CHARLES
BLACKMAN, FRED C.
BLACKMAN, WILLIAM W.
BOISVERT, CHRISTIAN R.
BOYNTON, CHARLES
BRIDGE, A. VERNON
BUFFUM, WILLIAM H.
CHMIEL, JANE
CLINTON, RALSTON D.
CONRON, CARL E. JR
CONRON, JOHN P.
CROSBY, R. WAYNE
DUGRENIER, GEORGE L.
DUGRENIER, RANE O.
DULUDE, ROBERT P.
EARLE, WILLIAM A.
ELLIS, WILLIAM J.
FARRAR, JOHN W. JR.
FLANDERS, SIDNEY D.
FULLER, CALEB A. JR.
GAGNON, WILLIAM
GEDDES, DONALD R.
GEDDES, ERIC e.
GUPTILL, HATTIE E.
HEWITT, GEORGE
HILL, LEONARD B.
HILL, MAYNARD A.
HORNER, J. RICHEY III
HORNER, W. ROBERT
HUNTLEY, NATHAN W.
HUNTLEY, QUENTIN
LABBEE, THEODORE H.
LUKEZA, CONSTANTI
MACK, LESTER M.
MARSHALL, ROBERT M.
MAXFIELD, ROBERT E.
MEEKINS, EARL R.
MERRILL, FRANCIS W.
MERRILL, GEORGE E.
MERRILL, RANSOM W.
MILLS, REDERIC L. JR
MOONEY, HAROLD
MORRISETTE, GEORGE H.
MORRISETTE, PAUL
O'CLAIR, WILLIAM H.
PAPAKALOS, TONY
PARIS, ALBERT A.
PARIS, MAURICE W.
PARIS, ROBERT H.
PAYNE, J. WHITNEY
POW, BRUCE S.
POW, ROBERT P.
POW, WALTER S.
ROGERS, HERBERT C.
RUMHILL, CLIFTON
SAVAGE, DAWSON F.
SLATUNUS, JULIUS
TILTON, JOSIAH B.
UNTIET, CHARLES J.
UNTIET, GEORGE A.
UNTIET, JOHN B. JR
UNTIET, RAYMOND O.
WALSH, THEODORE H.
WARRINER, DOUGLAS J.
WARRINER, ELMER P.
WARRINER, GEORGE
WARRINER,  ROBERT P.
WARRINER, WAYNE E.
WEATHERBEE, CHARLES
WEATHERBEE, CHESLEY W.
WEATHERBEE, GEORGE P.
WEATHERBEE, NORMAN B.
WEATHERBEE, WILBUR, B.
WELCH, WILLIAM F.
WHEELER, JOHN R.
WILLIAMS, LAURENCE
WILSON, DAVID A.
WILSON, JOHN
WILSON, PAUL G.
WILSON, RAY S.
WOODBURY, ANGUS B.


KOREAN CONFLICT
JUNE 25, 1950 - JAN. 21, 1955
BELIVEAU, ARMAND F.
BENOIT, ARTHUR J.
DOUCET, RODNEY W. JR
DUGRENIER, FRED R.
EARLE, WILLIAM A.
ELLIOT, THOMAS C.
GREEN, CHARLES B.
PARIS, FREDERICK D. JR
SAVAGE, DAWSON F.
SHERMAN, WILLIAM C.
SWINDLEHURST, JOHN R.
TUCKER, LEON R.
UNTIET, DONALD E.
UNTIET, RAYMOND O.
WALKER, JAMES B.
WALSH, THEODORE H.
WARRINER, JOHN D.
WESTONER, GORDON E.
ENTERED THE SERVICE FROM DUNBARTON, N.H.
DONATED BY AMERICAN LEGION
POST 116 DUNBARTON, N.H.

Note:  Donald E. Untiet died this past September 1st, 2018
Here is the link to his obituary:



VIETNAM CONFLICT
1964 - 1976
KEVIN S. BARTLETT
PAUL E. BARTLETT
MURRAY C. DUKE
RONALD J. DULUDE
RICHARD A. GEWEHR
RICHARD J. GOUPIL
DANIEL K. GRAVAS
ERIC T. GREENHALGE III
DANIEL E. MC GRATH
RAY U. MILLS
GORDON R. MOONEY
MARK W. MORGAN
ROSS G. NASH
DAVID L. NICHOLS
WILLIAM B. NICHOLS
JAMES H. OPIE
PAUL E. RIVARD
ARMAND P. THIBAULT JR
ROY W. P. THIBAULT
LEON R. TUCKER
DAVID H. WILLIAMS
CHARLES E. WILLIAMSON



The Town of Dunbarton, New Hampshire website:  https://dunbartonnh.org/

This blog post was written for the Honor Roll Project:
https://honorrollproject.weebly.com/

---------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Dunbarton, New Hampshire Military Honor Rolls", Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 9, 2018, (  https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/11/dunbarton-new-hampshire-military-honor.html: accessed [access date]). 

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Weathervane Wednesday ~ A Christian Church Symbol

I post another in a series of weather vane photographs every Wednesday.  This started with images of weathervanes from the Londonderry, New Hampshire area, but now I've found interesting weather vanes all across New England and across the globe.  Sometimes my weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are interesting.  Often my readers tip me off to some very unique or unusual weathervanes, too!  If you know a great weather vane near you, let me know if you'd like to have it featured on this blog.

Today's weather vane was photographed in New Hampshire.

Do you know the location of weathervane post #388?  Scroll down to find the answer.



This little building is the Trinity United Church Parish House in Seabrook, New Hampshire, located on Lafayette Road, across from the Town Hall.  The small weathervane is difficult to see as you come around the rotary near the intersection of Main Street and Folly Mill Road.  This is a Methodist congregation, and the church building itself is nearby at 29 Main Street. 

The ichthys is a Greek symbol made by two arcs.  This was a secret symbol used by early Christians to designate a meeting point.  The Greek letters IXOYE inside the fish is the acronym formed by the first letter of five words Iesous (Jesus), Xristos (Christ), Theo (God), Yios (Son), and Sotare (Savior).  The word "ixoye" is also the ancient Greek word for fish, recalling Matthew 4:19 when Jesus called the fishermen to be his apostles by asking them to be fishers of men.

I have seen this symbol used many time, but this is the first ichthys weathervane I have seen.


Click here to see the entire collection of Weathervane Wednesday posts!

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~  A Christian Church Symbol",  Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 7, 2018, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/11/weathervane-wednesday-christian-church.html: accessed [access date]). 

Tuesday, November 6, 2018

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Father and Son memorialized together on the Island of Martha's Vineyard

This tombstone was photographed at the West Tisbury Village Cemetery in Massachusetts on the island of Martha's Vineyard.



In Memory of
Mr. JOSEPH ALLEN
deceas'd  Jan. 5th 1798
Aged 74 Years & 6 Mo.
Mr. ZADOCK ALLEN
Son of
Sd. JOSEPH & PATIENCE his Wife
deceas'd in Auxcaeys Hispaniola
Feby. 15th 1797 Aged 33 Years
This Monument is jointly erected

Joseph Allen, son of Joseph Allen and Patience Bourne, was born July 1723 and died 5 Jan 1798.  He married Patience Nye on 26 September 1746 in Sandwich, Massachusetts and had seven children.  She was born 3 August 1728 in Barnstable, Massachusetts and died 13 February 1817, the daughter of Benjamin Nye and Lydia Freeman.  She is buried nearby her husband and son.

Joseph Allen is my first cousin, 9 generations removed. His father, Joseph Allen, is my 9th great uncle. I descend from his brother, John Allen (1682 - 1767) who married Margaret Holmes of Ireland.  She was the daughter of Rev. William Holmes, the famous Presbyterian minister of Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard. He was one of the few Scots Irish settlers to preceed the 1718 migration from Northern Ireland.

Aux Cayes is sometimes known as Les Cayes, a seaport in Haiti, which is on the island of Hispanola (Haiti and the Dominican Republic share this island west of Puerto Rico).

These ALLENs are descended from the Allen family of Braintree, Massachusetts.  You can read more about this lineage at this link: 
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/01/surname-saturday-allen-of-braintree.html 


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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday ~  Father and Son memorialized together on the Island of Martha's Vineyard", Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 6, 2018, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/11/tombstone-tuesday-father-and-son.html: accessed [access date]).