Saturday, December 8, 2018

Surname Saturday ~ PICKWORTH of Plymouth and Manchester, Massachusetts



PICKWORTH / PECKWORTH / PIKWORTH / PICKWORD

My 10th great grandfather, John Pickworth (about 1606 – 1663) arrived in New England about 1631, and lived briefly in Plymouth before settling in Salem, Massachusetts.  He eventually lived in that part of Salem known as “Jeffrie’s Creek” which is now the town of Manchester-by-the-Sea, Massachusetts.  On 6 February 1631/2 [Winthrop Papers, 1498 – 1654, Volume 3, page 65] the Governor of Plymouth, William Bradford, wrote to John Winthrop, the Governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, that  “John Pickworth, he came but as a sojourner to work for a few weeks, in which time he got a wife, and so is long since returned double, and hath no cause to complain, except he hath got a bad wife”.  There is no description of why the Governor thought Pickworth’s wife was “bad”.  She is known in records as Anne, but her maiden name is a mystery.

John Pickworth was a very active citizen of Manchester.  He was elected to several town positions, including selectman and constable.  He owned many parcels of land, and a share of the town sawmill.  He was also in court a few times, and the records show him being fined for drunkenness, and for fighting with John Norman (also my 9th great grandfather from Manchester, Massachusetts).  He was a member of the church in Salem, and had eight of his nine children baptized there.

John Pickworth died in 1663, and he left a will which names his wife, sons, and daughters.  The inventory of his estate included his land, house, meadows, and his share of the sawmill.  His wife died in 1682, named as “the widow Ane Pickworth Of Manchester” who left items to her daughters and to granddaughters “Ane Pickworth” (daughter of son Joseph), “Ane Killem” (daughter of John Kilham), and “Ane Sibblie” (daughter of her daughter Rachel Sibley).  All three granddaughters who were listed in the will were all named Anne. 

I descend from John and Anne’s daughter, Ruth Pickworth (1633 – 1716) who married Nathaniel Masters about 1653 and had seven children.  Her husband was presented at court in Salem for “his wife being with child by him before they were married, the act having been committed in Pequott Harbor.”  The case was sent to Connecticut for trial (Pequot Harbor is the mouth of the Pequot River (now the Thames River and the city of Groton, Connecticut).  I have not seen a record of the trial in Connecticut.

Some PICKWORTH resources:

For this blog post I used the sketch about John Pickworth in The Great Migration Begins, Volume III, pages 1462 – 1464.  I also researched in the Essex Quarterly Court records, the Winthrop Papers (see above), the Salem Town Records, and the book History of Manchester, Essex County, Massachusetts, 1645 – 1895 by Rev. Darius Francis Lamson, 1895.  See Alicia Crane Williams’ blog post “Human Nature Writ Large” at the Vita Brevis blog of NEHGS 2 January 2014 for another account of John Pickworth’s brawl with John Norman https://vitabrevis.americanancestors.org/2014/01/human-nature-writ-large/   

My PICKWORTH genealogy:

Generation 1:  John Pickworth, born about 1606 probably in England, and died between 27 June 1663 and 25 August 1663 in Manchester, Massachusetts; married about 1631 to Anne Unknown.  Nine children.

Generation 2:  Ruth Pickworth, baptized in Salem, Massachusetts on 14 October 1638, died on 5 April 1716; married about 1653 to Nathaniel Masters, son of John Masters and Joan Unknown.  He was born about 1613 and died 1 July 1708 in Manchester.  Seven children.

Generation 3: Lydia Masters m. Josiah Littlefield
Generation 4: Anna Littlefield m. Jacob Perkins
Generation 5: Stephen Perkins m. Comfort Chesley
Generation 6: Mary Perkins m. Nathaniel Batchelder
Generation 7: Jonathan Batchelder m. Nancy Thompson
Generation 8: George E. Batchelder m. Abigail M. Locke
Generation 9: George E. Batchelder m. Mary Katharine Emerson
Generation 10: Carrie Maude Batchelder m. Joseph Elmer Allen
Generation 11: Stanley Elmer Allen m. Gertrude Matilda Hitchings (my grandparents)

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, “Surname Saturday ~ PICKWORTH of Plymouth and Manchester, Massachusetts”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted December 8, 2018, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/11/surname-saturday-pickworth-of-plymouth.html: accessed [access date]). 

Thursday, December 6, 2018

Was your ancestor a Scottish Prisoner of War from the Battle of Dunbar?



During the English Civil War the Scots were on the side of the monarchy, and fought against the Puritans.  At the Battle of Dunbar on 3 September 1650 hundreds of Scots prisoners of war were marched to Durham and imprisoned in the cathedral.  150 of these prisoners were sent on the ship Unity to the Massachusetts Bay Colony as indentured servants.   Exactly one year later, on 3 September 1651 at the Battle of Worcester, several hundred more Scots were taken prisoner, and 272 were sent to Massachusetts on the ship John and Sara.   There was a passenger list of the men sent from Worcester, and a recreated passenger list of 180 suggested names from the battle of Dunbar.

Was your ancestor a Scot living in New England at this time period?  Is his name on one of these lists?

Next fall the Battle of Dunbar will be re-created and commemorated in Dunbar, East Lothian Scotland. The flyer above has been circulating on social media, and more information will be announced soon.  At the SPOW (Scottish Prisoners of War) Facebook group, many descendants are planning to attend the events in Scotland.

Are you one of the descendants who might be attending?



For the truly curious:

The Scottish Prisoners of War Society -   https://scottishprisonersofwar.com/ 

An alphabetized list of the Dunbar Prisoners:    https://scottishprisonersofwar.com/battle_of_dunbar_pows_america/

An alphabetized list of the Worcester Prisoners:
  https://scottishprisonersofwar.com/battle_of_wor_pows_in_america/ 

Durham University: Scottish Soldiers Project:     https://www.dur.ac.uk/archaeology/research/projects/europe/pg-skeletons/ 


Some other blog posts I have published on this subject:

September 2015 - The Discovery of the Scots Prisoners of War graves in Durham, England:
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2015/09/discovery-of-scots-prisoners-of-war-at.html 

October 2016 - University of Durham Team visits Descendants in Saugus, Massachusetts
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/10/university-of-durham-team-is-reaching.html 

August 2011 - The Ship John and Sara Prisoners of War 1651
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2011/08/ship-john-and-sara-prisoners-of-war.html

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Was your ancestor a Scottish Prisoner of War from the Battle of Dunbar?", Nutfield Genealogy, posted December 6, 2018 ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/12/was-your-ancestor-scottish-prisoner-of.html: accessed [access date]).

Wednesday, December 5, 2018

Weathervane Wednesday ~ Seen in London, England

I post another in a series of weather vane photographs every Wednesday.  This started with images of weathervanes from the Londonderry, New Hampshire area, but now I've found interesting weather vanes all across New England and across the globe.  Sometimes my weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are interesting.  Often my readers tip me off to some very unique or unusual weathervanes, too!  If you know a great weather vane near you, let me know if you'd like to have it featured on this blog.

Today's weather vane was photographed in England.

Do you know the location of weathervane post #392?  Scroll down to find the answer.





Last year we toured England as part of the General Society of Mayflower Descendants Historic Sites trip, and we arrived in London a few days early to explore.  On the day we visited the Temple Church we walked along the Strand towards Trafalgar Square.  We passed by this lovely weathervane on top of the steeple of the St. Clement Danes Church, which sits in the middle of the road.

This church was originally built on this spot in the 800s by the Danes, rebuilt by William the Conqueror, and the present day building was erected by Sir Christopher Wren in the 1680s.  During the Blitz this building was badly damaged and burned, and in 1958 it was rebuilt as the Royal Air Force Chapel. The steeple survived the Blitz, but I don't know if this weathervane is original.  St. Clement was martyred by being chained to an iron anchor which was tossed overboard.  Now St. Clement is the patron saint of blacksmiths. 

Did you ever sing the nursery rhyme "Oranges and Lemons"?  The words go "Oranges and Lemons sing the bells of St. Clement's".  We waited a few minutes and heard the bells, and they did sound like the words of the rhyme! 




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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~ Seen in London, England", Nutfield Genealogy, posted December 5, 2018, (https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/12/weathervane-wednesday-seen-in-london.html: accessed [access date]). 

Tuesday, December 4, 2018

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Hildreth mother and son, Manchester, New Hampshire

This tombstone was photographed at the Valley Cemetery in Manchester, New Hampshire



HILDRETH
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HARRIETT GILBERT HILDRETH
1841 - 1919

FREDERICK HILDRETH
1865 - 1883

Harriett F. Gilbert was born in 1841, the daughter of Zebedee C. Gilbert and Harriett N. Plummer.  Zebedee Gilbert was born in 1817 and died on 24 January 1853 in Goffstown, and he was listed in many Manchester government and city references online, as well as in the 4th company of the 9th regiment of the N.H. state militia.  He married Harriett Plummer on 28 May 1840 in Goffstown.  She was the daughter of John Plummer and Mary McFerson, born 1817 in Goffstown and died 9 April 1854.  

On 1 June 1864 in Cambridge, Massachusetts "Hattie" F. Gilbert married Charles W. Hildreth, son of  James and Azubah Hildreth.  Charles was born in Haverstraw, New York about 1841.  Charles and Harriett had a son Frederick, born in Washington DC and died 25 April 1883 in Manchester.  He was only 18 years old and he died of spinal meningitis. 

This tombstone is located at Valley Cemetery, near the stairs down to the lower part of the cemetery, on a very steep slope.  It is plot 1153.  When we photographed this area, it was full of undergrowth that had not been trimmed back in a very long time, and many tombstones were obscured.  If you compare this to the photos at the Find A Grave website, you will see how they used to look when the city took good care of this cemetery.  https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/51122091/harriett-hildreth   

This is how the area looks now...


Click here for a previous blog post on the volunteer efforts to spruce up Valley Cemetery:


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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday ~ Hildreth mother and son, Manchester, New Hampshire", Nutfield Genealogy, posted December 4, 2018, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/12/tombstone-tuesday-hildreth-mother-and.html: accessed [access date]).

Saturday, December 1, 2018

Surname Saturday ~ ROPER of Hampton, New Hampshire and Ipswich, Massachusetts

An early map of Hampton, New Hampshire

ROPER


This is a new blog post on my 10th great grandfather, Walter Roper (1614 - 1680), an early settler at Hampton, New Hampshire and Ipswich, Massachusetts.  Walter Roper’s origins are unknown.  He was born about 1614 and he was a carpenter.  He was given a grant of land in Hampton, New Hampshire in June 1640 [Documents and Records relating to the Province of New Hampshire Volume 1, page 152].  In 1642 he became a freeman in Hampton, and served as a selectman in 1644.  Sometime in the 1640s he removed to Ipswich, Massachusetts. 


The will of Walter Roper, dated 15 July 1680 and proven 28 September 1680

In the name of god amen, I Walter Roper of Ipswich in Newengland being at this present time of perfit understanding & memory though weake in body comiting my soull into the hands of almighty god & my body to deasent buriall in hope of Resorection to eternal life by the power & merit of Jesus Christ, my most mersyfulle savior & redemer, doe thus dispos of the temporal estate that god hath graciasly given me.

Imprimis I give to Susan my wiffe the bed she layeth on with all that belongeth too it, with liberty to dispose of it as she pleaseth amongst my Children at her death; my will is that my sonn John shall maintaine my wiffe Conveniantly Comfortable in diet & Clothis;

& also that my wiffe shall have haife the fruit of my orchard, & also the use of the roome she now lodgeth in which is the parlor, & also the use of the rest of the rooms of the hous that I leave to my sonn John for her nesesary ocations, & if it shall faale out that my wiff doth not like her waye of living, then my will is that my wiffe shall have the use of my household goods, alonge with my sonn John; & allso my sonn John Shall maintaine her one Cow & four sheep, winter & somer, & if any one of th111 miscary, he to put another in the roome of it; also to Kepe her one hogg yearly & also to find her nessesary firewood and a horse for her necessary use, & also paye to her therre pounds a yeare, one haife in wheet & mault, the other half in Indian corn, all marchantable, all which she shall injoye so longe as she shall remaine a widdo;

also if my wiffe shall marrye, my sonn John shall paye to my widdo fouer pounds a year, and be freed from all the particulars above expressed. I give to my sonn Nath^### [Nathaniel] four accers of marsh I bought of Nehemiah Jewet or twenty pounds in Currant pay® after my wiffes desseas, also half my Carpenters tooles at my desseas, also eight pounds, foure pounds of it to be p^### within one year after my wiffs desseas, & foure pounds foure years after my wiffes deseas. I give to my dafter Mary five pounds to be p^### one half within one yeare after my wiffes decceas, & the other haife foure years after my wiffes decceas. I give to my dafter Elizabeth five pounds to be p^### one haife one year after my wiffes decceas, & the other haife foure years after my wiffes decceas. I give to my dafter Sarah tenn pounds to be pd one haife one yeare after my wiffes decceas, & the other haife fourer years after my wiffes decceas. I give to my grandchild Elizabeth Sparks five pounds to be p^### at the age of twenty one years. I give grandchildren Susan, Margarit, Rose & Sarah Sparks twenty shillings a pecce to be p^### at the age of twenty one years.

I give my grandchild John Sparks forty shilings to be pd at the age of twenty one years.

I give my grandchild John Duch [Dutch] forty shilings to be pd at the age of twenty one years; & also to my grandchildren Elizabeth & Susan Duch [Dutch] twenty shilings apecce to be p° at the age of twenty one years.

I do apoint my loving trends John Deneson, Senr. , John Brewer, Senr. , & John Whipple, Senr. of Ipswich the overseers of this my last will & testament & I doe hereby give them power to determin any differancs that maye arise betwen my executor & any of the Legatates aforesaid abought the payments afores^###. I doe ordaine & appoint my Sonn John Roper my sole executor of this my last will & testement, to whome I give all the rest of my estate, both houses, lands & Cattle, goods of alsorts, & depts from whomsoever due unto him [&] his heyers forever. In Confirmation whereof I have heruntoe sett my hand & sealle this fivetenth of July 1680 in pressents of us This will proved in court at Ipswich the 28 of Sept 1680. To be the last will & testament of Walter Roper by the oath of Capt John Whipple & John Denison to the best [of] there knowledge and that he was of a disposeing mynd, as attest 
Robert Lord clerk

[From the Sparks Family Association website http://www.sparksfamilyassn.org/pages/164-A.html  Essex County Probate 24143]


For more information on Walter Roper:

There is no sketch of Walter Roper in the Great Migration series.  There are very brief sketches of Walter Roper listed in Savage’s Genealogical Dictionary of New England and Torrey’s New England Marriages Prior to 1700.  There is also a sketch of him Massachusetts and Maine Families in the Ancestry of Walter Goodwin Davis, by Walter Goodwin Davis, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1996, Volume III, pages 239 – 241.  There are several land transactions and lawsuits concerning Walter Roper in the Essex Quarterly Court record.  Don't forget that Hampton, New Hampshire was part of Old Norfolk County, Massachusetts at this time period, there are several records of Walter Roper in the Old Norfolk County records, too. 


My ROPER lineage:


Generation 1: Walter Roper, born about 1614 in England, died between 15 July and 28 September 1680 in Ipswich, Massachusetts; married to Susan Unknown. Six children.


Generation 2: Mary Roper, baptized on 22 August 1641 in Hampton, New Hampshire, died in 1712 in Ipswich, Massachusetts; married John Sparks. He was born about 1630 and died before March 1704 in Ipswich, Massachusetts. Eight children.


Generation 3: Elizabeth Sparks m. Jacob Perkins


Lineage A:
Generation 4: Elizabeth Perkins m. David Burnham


Lineage A1:

Generation 5: David Burnham m. Elizabeth Marshall

Generation 6: Amos Burnham m. Sarah Giddings

Generation 7: Judith Burnham m. Joseph Allen

Generation 8: Joseph Allen m. Orpha Andrews

Generation 9: Joseph Gilman Allen m. Sarah Burnham Mears

Generation 10: Joseph Elmer Allen m. Carrie Maude Batchelder

Generation 11: Stanley Elmer Allen m. Gertrude Matilda Hitchings (my grandparents)


Lineage A2:


Generation 5: Westley Burnham m. Deborah Story


Lineage A2a:


Generation 6: Westley Burnham m. Molly Woodbury


Lineage A2ai:

Generation 7: Asa Burnham m. Polly Bray

Generation 8: Lydia W. Burnham m. Samuel Mears

Generation 9: Samuel Mears m. Sarah Ann Burnham

Generation 10: Sarah Burnham Mears m. Joseph Gilman Allen (see above)


Lineage A2aii:

Generation 7: Henry Burnham m. Sally Poland

Generation 8: Sarah Ann Burnham m. Samuel Mears

Generation 9: Sarah Burnham Mears m. Joseph Gilman Allen (see above)


Lineage A2b:

Generation 6: Sarah Burnham m. Abner Poland

Generation 7: Sally Poland m. Henry Burnham (see above)


Lineage B:

Generation 4:  Jacob Perkins m. Anna Littlefield
Generation 5:   Stephen Perkins m. Comfort Chesley
Generation 6:  Mary Perkins m. Nathaniel Batchelder
Generation 7:  Jonathan Batchelder m. Nancy Thompson
Generation 8: George E. Batchelder m. Abigail M. Locke
Generation 9: George E. Batchelder m. Mary Katherine Emerson
Generation 10:  Carrie Maude Batchelder m. Joseph Elmer Allen
Generation 11: Stanley Elmer Allen m. Gertrude Matilda Hitchings (my grandparents)

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, “Surname Saturday ~ ROPER of Hampton, New Hampshire and Ipswich, Massachusetts”,  Nutfield Genealogy, posted December 1, 2018, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/12/surname-saturday-roper-of-hampton-new.html: accessed [access date]). 

Friday, November 30, 2018

December 2018 Genealogy and Local History Calendar





For last minute updates, see the “Nutfield Genealogy” Facebook page at this link:  https://www.facebook.com/nutfield.gen/    Please send new events to me by commenting here at the end of this post, or email vrojomit@gmail.com

  
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November 30, December 1 and 2, Friday – Sunday, 39th Annual Christmas in Salem House Tour.  View historic houses in the House of Seven Gables and Historic Derby Street Neighborhoods all decked out in full holiday regalia, as well as special events like walking tours and wine tastings.  See the website www.christmasinsalem.org  

December 1, Saturday, 10am - noon, Merrimack Valley DNA Special Interest Group Meeting, at the Georgetown Peabody Library, Georgetown, Massachusetts. Hosted by Diane Brooks-Sherry of the Merrimack Valley chapter of the Massachusetts Society of Genealogists.  Come explore the Leeds method of color coding and the Icicle method that adds 4th cousins to the Leeds Method.  Free to the public. 

December 1, Saturday, 10am to 4pm, Holiday Open House:  Colonial Arts and Crafts, at the Old South Meeting House, Boston, Massachusetts.  Musical performances, try writing with a quill pen, and more crafts!  Free to the public, and family friendly. 

December 1, Saturday, 10am, New Visitor Tour of the New England Historic Genealogical Society Library, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts. Free orientation and tour. No membership needed.  No registration.  Tour attendees are welcome to stay and use the library following the tour.

December 1 and 8, Saturdays, 2pm, Capturing Family Stories with your Cell Phone: A Two Part Workshop, at the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Presented by Bob Craigue, cost $30.  Register at www.americanancestors.org 

December 3, Monday, 6pm, Rochambeau: The French Military Presence in Boston, at the Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Presented by Robert Selig of the Washington-Rochambeau National Historic Trail.  $10 per person fee)  Call 617-646-0576 or register online at www.masshist.org/events 

December 4, Tuesday, 5:15pm, “Attend to the Opium”: Boston’s Trade with China in the Early 19th Century, at the Massachusetts Historical Society 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Presented by Gwenn Miller, College of the Holy Cross with comments by Dael Norwood, University of Delaware.  Free to the public, please RSVP seminars@masshist.org or call 617-646-0579.

December 4, Tuesday, 7pm, Tracing Your Scottish Ancestors, at the Chelmsford Library, 25 Boston Road, Chelmsford, Massachusetts.  Sponsored by the Chelmsford Genealogy Club, and presented by David Dearborn, retired Senior Genealogist from the New England Historic Genealogical Society.

December 5, Wednesday, 6pm, The History of the Four Western Massachusetts Counties (Hampden, Hampshire, Berkshire, and Franklin), at the Agawam Senior Center, 954 Main Street, Agawam, Massachusetts.  Sponsored by the Western Mass. Genealogical Society, presented by Cliff McCarthy.  

December 6, Thursday, noon, Washington and Rochambeau in Connecticut, at the Connecticut Historical Society, 1 Elizabeth Street, Hartford, Connecticut. Presented by Robert A. Selig.  Bring a lunch to enjoy during the talk.  RSVP by December 5 860-236-5621 x238 or email rsvp@chs.org Free with admission.

December 6, Thursday, 6pm, The Orphan Train Movement:  History, Genealogy, Legacy, at the Boston Public Library, Boston, Massachusetts. Presented by genealogist Michael Brophy.  Free to the public.

December 6, Thursday, 6pm, Boston in the Great War: Manuscripts & Artifacts of World War I, at the Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Presented by Bruce J. Schulman, Boston University. Free to the public. RSVP required https://www.masshist.org/calendar/event?event=2725 

December 6, Thursday, 7pm, All in the Family:  One Hour Genealogy Class, at the Andover Public Library, 2 North Main Street, Andover, Massachusetts.  Led by reference and local history librarian Stephanie Aude.  Registration required by calling 978-623-8430. 

December 7, Friday, noon, Bound to Sell:  Nineteenth Century American Commercial Bookbindings, at the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Free to the public as part of the First Friday Lecture series.  Presented by Todd Pattison.  Register here:  https://my.americanancestors.org/single/eventDetail.aspx?p=966 

December 7, Friday, 12:30pm, Commemoration of the 77th Anniversary of the Attack on Pearl Harbor, at the USS Cassin Young, Charlestown Navy Yard, Charlestown, Massachusetts.  Presented by the National Parks of Boston, the USS Constitution, the Naval History and Heritage Command Detachment Boston, and the USS Constitution Museum.  A wreath will be laid from the stern of the USS Cassin, and a lunch will follow in the museum, courtesy of the City of Boston's Veteran's Services Department. 

December 8, Saturday, 1:30pm, Impact of the 1918 Flu Epidemic, at the Wayland Public Library, 5 Concord Road, Wayland, Massachusetts.  Presented by Lori Lyn Price and sponsored by the Middlesex Chapter of the Massachusetts Society of Genealogists  http://www.msoginc.org  Free to the public. 

December 9, Sunday, 10am - 4pm, Lexington Tea Burning, at the Lexington Visitor's Center, 1875 Massachusetts Avenue, Lexington, Massachusetts.  Free to the public.  The 18th century soldier encampment opens at 10am, followed by musket drills, 18th century cooking demonstrations, parades, music and it all culminates with the burning of the tea at 1:30pm.  The Historic Buckman Tavern, decorated for the holidays, will be open for free tours.  

December 9, Sunday, 2pm, The film "Wolyn" with lecture by Dr. Tadeusz Piotrowski, at Elms College Library Theater, 291 Springfield Street, Chicopee, Massachusetts. Presented by the Polish Center of Discovery and Learning along with the Department of Social Sciences at Elm College.  There will be a discussion/ question and answer period directly following.  Warning:  because of the depiction of extreme violence, this film is not recommended for younger audiences. 

December 11, Tuesday, 2pm, One Family's History - from 1840 to 1940, at the Berkshire Atheneum, 1 Wendell Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachusetts.  Join the Western Massachusetts Roots Events team for this two hour session using the US Census and Ancestry in a class presented by Cathi Iuliano.  Registration required, please call 413-499-9486, extension 6 to sign up. Bring your own laptops.  This class is FREE. 

December 11, Tuesday, 6pm, American Eden: David Hosack, Botany, and Medicine in the Garden of the Early Republic, at the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Free to the public.  Presented by author and historian Victoria Johnson.  Book sales and signing to follow the talk.

December 11, Wednesday, 7pm, A Brief History of Old Newbury, at the Newburyport Public Library, Newburyport, Massachusetts.  This talk is expected to exceed capacity.  Free tickets will be handed out starting at 6:30.  Presented by author and local historian Bethany Groff Dorau. 

December 12, Wednesday, 10am, New Visitor Tour of the New England Historic Genealogical Society Library, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts. Free orientation and tour. No membership needed.  No registration.  Tour attendees are welcome to stay and use the library following the tour.

December 12, Wednesday, 6pm, No More, America, at the Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  A short film by Peter Galison, co-directed with Henry Louis Gates reimagines the 1773 Harvard debate about slavery and including the voice of Phillis Wheatley, the acclaimed poet.  Film screening followed by discussion between Galison and Gates.  $10 entrance fee, please register online at www.masshist.org/events   

December 12, Wednesday, 6pm, Founding Martyr:  The Life and Death of Dr. Joseph Warren, the American Revolution’s Lost Hero, at the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts. Free to the public.  Presented by author Christian Di Spigna. 

December 12, Wednesday, 7pm, Long Story Short: Family Ties, at the 3S Artspace, 319 Vaughan Street, Portsmouth, New Hampshire.  Ticked $5 each. An ongoing storytelling series.  See the Facebook page:  https://www.facebook.com/LSSat3S/ 

December 14, Friday, 1:30pm, Irish Genealogy before 1800, at the Rogers Public Library, Hudson, New Hampshire.  Presented by genealogist Tom Toohey.  Free to the public.

December 16, Sunday, 2pm - 5pm, Boston Area Chantey and Maritime Sing, at the USS Constitution Museum in the Charlestown Navy Yard, Building 22, Charlestown, Massachusetts.  Family friendly, free with admission. Open to anyone who would like to participate.  

December 16, Sunday, 6:30pm – 8:30pm, The 245th Anniversary of the Boston Tea Party Reeenactment, at the Old South Meeting House (6:30 for a town meeting to protest the tax on tea, ticketed), or join the rabble outside (free to the public), a 7:30 parade through the financial district to the waterfront (free to the public) following the original route the patriots marched, and at 8pm the public is invited to line the shores of Boston Harbor and watch the Sons of Liberty storm the Brig Beaver to destroy the chests of tea (free to the public, some reserved seats for ticket holders).

December 28, Friday, 7pm, Huzzah!  Tavern Night!, at the Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum.  Revel with Sam Adams, John Hancock, Dorothy Quincy and other prominent Bostonians as they lift their glasses in celebration.  Doors open at 6:30, show begins at 7pm. Family Friendly.  Sample rustic tavern fare, with beverages offered at an additional charge. Tickets at this link: https://www.trustedtours.com/store/tavern-nights-at-boston-tea-party-ships.aspx?fbclid=IwAR0Gqls6oLh6FWzufQPzFKehjmUFcK3HZK89fh6ynF65DayJ9LNKiAK9yHs  

Future events: 


March 11, 2018, Telling Your Family Story, at the Nackey S. Loeb School of Communications, 749 East Industrial Park Drive, Manchester, New Hampshire.  $60 fee for the workshop, including lunch.  Instructors include media professionals who tell New Hampshire stories, historians, videographers, and an archivist to offer tips on preserving and protecting photos and family papers.  Register online http://www.loebschool.org/application-form.asp  or call for information 603-627-0005 

March 16, 2019, Saturday, History Camp Boston, at Suffolk University Law School, across from the Old Granary Burying Ground, in downtown Boston, Massachusetts. See the website for more information and registration. http://historycamp.org/boston?fbclid=IwAR1iGXontgxTK4ogaN7xfy46sifH8I-RJrljRcAR2YKeBRdCwWq9tjKkJs8    

April 3-6, 2019,  New England Regional Genealogical Conference NERGC in Manchester, New Hampshire at the Radisson Hotel on Elm Street.  http://www.nergc.org/2019-conference/ for more information.

August 10 – 16, 2019, Founders, Fishermen and Family History Cruise, On Holland America’s ms Zaandam, departing Boston on August 10 for a 7 night trip to Canada, ports include Montreal, Quebec City, the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Charlottetown (Prince Edward Island), Sydney, Halifax, Bar Harbor, and Boston, Massachusetts. Speakers include the genealogists Gena Philibert-Ortega, Tami Osmer Mize, and David Allen Lambert. See the website for more information: http://www.oconnelltravel.com/rw/view/38994 

Wednesday, November 28, 2018

Weathervane Wednesday ~ A Pretty Sailboat

I post another in a series of weather vane photographs every Wednesday.  This started with images of weathervanes from the Londonderry, New Hampshire area, but now I've found interesting weather vanes all across New England and across the globe.  Sometimes my weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are interesting.  Often my readers tip me off to some very unique or unusual weathervanes, too!  If you know a great weather vane near you, let me know if you'd like to have it featured on this blog.

Today's weather vane was photographed in New Hampshire.

Do you know the location of weathervane post #391?  Scroll down to find the answer.






This three dimensional sailboat was photographed along Ocean Drive in Seabrook, New Hampshire.  This metal weathervane is complete with intricate sails, flag, rigging, and even a rudder. It is appropriate because this is a waterfront home, facing the Atlantic Ocean right on the coast.  There are fine views of boats and ships passing this beach, and of the Isles of Shoals just off shore. 

I photographed some other weathervanes on this same street on the same day I photographed this sailboat.  You can see that blog post at this link:



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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~ A Pretty Sailboat", Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 28, 2018, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/11/weathervane-wednesday-pretty-sailboat.html: accessed [access date]). 

Tuesday, November 27, 2018

Tombstone Tuesday ~ David Adams and Mary Woodman, buried at Derry, New Hampshire

This tombstone was photographed at the Forest Hill Cemetery in East Derry, New Hampshire.  This town was part of Londonderry, New Hampshire until the schism, or split of the towns, in 1827.


Elder DAVID ADAMS
died Jan. 24, 1838 A.E. 83 years
          MARY his wife
died Sep. 19, 1816 A. E. 64
                SAMUEL ADAMS
died Jan. 12, 1822 A.E. 69
MARY, Daughter of
DAVID & MARY ADAMS
died April 2, 1838. A.E. 57



This is an enormous gravestone (taller than me, and I'm 5 foot 7 inches), but it is half empty of inscriptions.  Perhaps the Adams family was planning on listing many more family members? There were many Adamses buried nearby.  If you would like to see the blog post for the dark gray tombstone to the left of the large slab, click HERE (it is the burial spot of their son, David Adams, Jr. who died when a senior at Harvard College). 

David Adams, the son of Samuel Adams and Mary Jewett, was born 10 December 1754 in Newbury, Massachusetts.  He was married on 22 September 1778 in Newbury to Mary Woodman, daughter of John Woodman and Hannah Adams, who was born 9 November 1752 in Newbury.  They had seven children:   Samuel, Mary, David Adams II, John Woodman, Hannah, Elizabeth and Sally.  David Adams was the brother of Samuel Adams, who married Mary's sister, Elizabeth Woodman (two brothers married two sisters).  

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday ~ David Adams and Mary Woodman, buried at Derry, New Hampshire", Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 27, 2018, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/11/tombstone-tuesday-david-adams-and-mary.html: accessed [access date]).

Saturday, November 24, 2018

Surname Saturday ~ HUBBARD of Salisbury, Massachusetts



HUBBARD / HOBART / HUBBURD

I have already blogged about another HUBBARD ancestral family – the descendants of Hugh Hubbard (about 1640 – 1685) of New London, Connecticut at this link:  https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2013/10/surname-saturday-hubbard-of-new-london.html  

This second HUBBARD lineage descends from Richard Hubbard (1645 – 1719) of Salisbury, Massachusetts.  He doesn’t seem to be related to any of the Ipswich or Boston Hubbard families, even though James Savage (Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England) implies he might be the son of Richard Hubbard of Ipswich. 

Richard Hubbard, my 9th great grandfather, was a blacksmith in Salisbury.  He was known as “Cornet Richard Hubbard”, which is an archaic term referring to the lowest ranked officer in a British troop, lower than captain or lieutenant (now equivalent to a second lieutenant).  In 1692 both Richard and his wife Martha (Allen) signed the Bradbury Petition.  On 22 July 1692 over 100 friends and neighbors of Mary (Perkins) Bradbury in Salisbury signed a petition protesting her innocence when she was arrested during the Salem witch trials.  She was found guilty and sentenced to be hanged, but the ongoing petitions and protests caused her execution to be delayed until after the hysteria had passed. 

In 1700 Richard and Martha Hubbard also bought land in Boston on Fort Hill, in the district of Roxbury.  The deeds name him as Richard Hubbard the blacksmith.  He deeded this land and the dwelling to his son Joseph Hubbard, who was also a blacksmith, and to Abigail Wheeler, the widow of Henry Wheeler. Although he briefly owned this land in Boston, he stayed as a resident of Salisbury.

Richard’s epitaph at the Colonial Burying Ground in Salisbury reads “Cornet Richard Hubburd / Died June ye 16 1719 / aged 88 years / Faith and Love Are laid in ye dust / waiting for ye resorrection in ye just.”

Richard Hubbard and Martha Allen are the ancestors of Governor John Langdon of New Hampshire, signer of the U.S. Constitution.

Some HUBBARD resources:

Old Families of Salisbury and Amesbury, Massachusetts, by David W. Hoyt, 1919 (See Volume 1, pages 31 and 210).

The Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire, by Noyes, Libby, and Davis, 1928, page 354

The Suffolk County Deeds

My HUBBARD genealogy:

Generation 1:  Richard Hubbard, born about 1645, and died 26 June 1719 in Salisbury, Massachusetts; married about 1666 in Salisbury to Martha Allen, daughter of William Allen and Ann Goodale.  She was born about 1646 in Salisbury and died 4 October 1718 in Salisbury.  Ten children.

Generation 2:  Comfort Hubbard, born 17 January 1682 in Salisbury, and died 20 March 1756; married on 7 November 1699 in Boston to Joshua Weeks.  He was a son of Leonard Weeks and Mary Redman.  Nine children.

Generation 3:  Mary Weeks m. Jonathan Chesley
Generation 4: Comfort Chesley m. Stephen Perkins
Generation 5:  Mary Perkins m. Nathaniel Batchelder
Generation 6:  Jonathan Batchelder m. Nancy Thompson
Generation 7:  George E. Batchelder m. Abigail M. Locke
Generation 8:  George E. Batchelder m. Mary Katharine Emerson
Generation 9:  Carrie Maude Batchelder m. Joseph Elmer Allen
Generation 10:  Stanley Elmer Allen m. Gertrude Matilda Hitchings (my grandparents)

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, “Surname Saturday ~  HUBBARD of Salisbury, Massachusetts”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 24, 2018, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/11/surname-saturday-hubbard-of-salisbury.html: accessed [access date]). 

Wednesday, November 21, 2018

Weathervane Wednesday ~ A North Country Bank

I post a series of weather vane photographs every Wednesday.  This started with images of weathervanes from the Londonderry, New Hampshire area, but now I've found interesting weather vanes all across New England and across the globe.  Sometimes my weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are interesting.  Often my readers tip me off to some very unique or unusual weathervanes, too!  If you know a great weather vane near you, let me know if you'd like to have it featured on this blog.

Today's weather vane was photographed in New Hampshire.

Do you know the location of weathervane post #390?  Scroll down to find the answer.





Today's weathervane was photographed by reader June Stearns Butka.  She was passing through Franconia, New Hampshire and she saw this weathervane from her car, and snapped an image with her phone.  Through the magic of "Google Maps" I was able to identify this unique weathervane as the one on top of the Woodsville Guarantee Savings Bank at 278 Main Street in Franconia.  Nice job, June!

This weathervane features the face of the "Old Man of the Mountain" which was a naturally formed rock formation in Franconia Notch.  In 2003 the formation slid off the side of Cannon Mountain following an ice storm.  This old granite face had been a symbol of New Hampshire for centuries, and was featured in advertising, classic literature, and on hundreds of souvenirs.  It is still featured on New Hampshire state license plates and road markers for the state highway system.

There are several other weathervanes in the state of New Hampshire featuring the "Old Man of the Mountain" also known as the "Great Stone Face":

A Church in Conway Village, New Hampshire
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2015/07/weathervane-wednesday-old-man-of.html

At a rest area off Route 93 in Salem, New Hampshire
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2012/05/weathervane-wednesday-welcome-to-new.html



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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~ A North Country Bank", Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 21, 2013, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/11/weathervane-wednesday-north-country-bank.html:  accessed [access date]). 

Tuesday, November 20, 2018

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Baby John Newton Clark, 1815, Londonderry, New Hampshire

This tombstone was photographed at the Forest Hill Cemetery in East Derry, New Hampshire.  At the time of the burial, this was Londonderry, New Hampshire.


John Newton
son of Capt. John &
Mrs. Sarah Clark,
died Sept 8, 1815
aged 3 months.

Not father's sighs nor mother's tears
Could save me from the tomb,
Nor would I for more years
If Christ has called me home. 

John Clark (son of Robert Clark and Letitia Cochran) and Sarah Taylor (daughter of Samuel Taylor and Eunice Lancaster,  and granddaughter of immigrant settlers Matthew and Jennet Taylor) were married in Londonderry, New Hampshire on 4 March 1802.  They had eight children and three died in infancy.   One of their daughters was a famous missionary you can read about at this link HERE.

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday ~ Baby John Newton Clark, 1815, Londonderry, New Hampshire", Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 20, 2018, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/11/tombstone-tuesday-baby-john-newton.html: accessed [access date]).

Saturday, November 17, 2018

Surname Saturday ~ WEEKS of Greenland, New Hampshire

The Weeks Brick House
built circa 1710 by Samuel Weeks, my 9th great uncle


WEEKS / WEEKES /  WICKES

Much of the information about my 9th great grandfather, Leonard Weeks (1633 – 1707) is from an 1889 book.  Not many people realize that this information has been researched, updated, and published at the journal of the New Hampshire Society of Genealogists.  See below for the information on this book and the journal article. There is also an active Weeks family association that maintains updates on the family genealogy (see below for links to the family association webpage.)

Leonard Weeks is of unknown origins, but he was born about 1633, probably in England, and first appears a Maine record as a witness in 1655.  By 29 June 1656 he received his first grant of land in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.  In 1660 he received more acreage, and by February 1660/61 he had settled in what is now the town of Greenland, on the Winnicut River
. 
My ancestor married three times.  First to a daughter of Deacon Samuel Haines, then to Mary Redman, the daughter of John Redman, and third to a woman known only as “Elizabeth”.  He had eight children with Mary Redman, my 9th great grandmother. 

In 1655 the court found Leonard Weeks guilty of swearing and fined him 10 shillings plus court fees of 3 shillings.  However, he must have been respected in the community because the very next year he was elected selectman, and later as the constable and as the sheriff.  His seat in the church at Portsmouth was “No. 4 in front of the pulpit”. 

I descend from his son Joshua Weeks (1674 – 1758) who married Comfort Hubbard.  My 8th great grandparents had nine children and lived in Greenland.  Comfort was the sister of Thomas Hubbard, a wealthy resident of Boston and treasurer of Harvard College.  They lived on the “Bay Side” of Greenland. Joshua was the colonel of the local militia, and was also a justice of the peace.  
In the next generation I descend from the eldest daughter, Mary Weeks (about 1700 – 1765) who married Jonathan Chesley, and they resided in nearby Durham, New Hampshire.

The Weeks Brick House was built by Samuel Weeks, son of Leonard Weeks and brother of Joshua, in 1710 in Greenland, New Hampshire is operated by the Weeks family association, as a organizational member of Historic New England.  This is one of the earliest brick homes build in New England.  It is open for tours by appointment 603-436-8147. See the website www.weeksbrickhouse.org    The family association has an annual family reunion every September.  The WEEKS DNA project is at this link:  https://www.familytreedna.com/groups/weeks-weekes-wicks/about  

Some WEEKS resources:

Leonard Weeks, of Greenland, N. H. & Descendants, 1639 – 1888, by Jacob Chapman, 1889 (available online at HathiTrust, Archive.org, and at Ancestry).

“New Thoughts on the Family of Leonard Weeks”, by Janet Ireland Delorey and Melinda Lutz Sanborn, New Hampshire Genealogical Record,  Vol. 19, Numbers 2 and 3, April and August 2002.

The Leonard Weeks and Descendants in America, a family association  www.weeksbrickhouse.org  and their Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/WeeksBrickHouse/  

My WEEKS genealogy:

Generation 1:  Leonard Weeks, born about 1633 in England; died about 1707 in Greenland, New Hampshire; married about 1667 to Mary Redman, his second wife, daughter of John Redman and Margaret Knight.  She was born 15 December 1649 and died about 1694.  Eight children. 

Generation 2: Joshua Weeks, born 30 June 1674 in Greenland, and died 13 June 1758 in Greenland; married on 7 November 1699 in Boston, Massachusetts to Comfort Hubbard, daughter of Richard Hubbard and Martha Allen.  She was born 17 January 1682 and died 20 March 1756.  Nine children.

Generation 3:  Mary Weeks, born about 1700 in Greenland, died about July 1765; married on 17 November 1720 in Greenland to Jonathan Chesley, son of Phillip Chesley and Sarah Rollins.  Three children.

Generation 4:  Comfort Chesley m. Stephen Perkins
Generation 5:  Mary Perkins m. Nathaniel Batchelder
Generation 6:  Jonathan Batchelder m. Nancy Thompson
Generation 7:  George E. Batchelder m. Abigail M. Locke
Generation 8:  George E. Batchelder m. Mary Katharine Emerson
Generation 9:  Carrie Maude Batchelder m. Joseph Elmer Allen
Generation 10:  Stanley Elmer Allen m. Gertrude Matilda Hitchings (my grandparents)

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Surname Saturday ~ WEEKS of Greenland, New Hampshire", Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 17, 2018, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/11/surname-saturday-weeks-of-greenland-new.html: accessed [access date]).