Saturday, June 23, 2018

Surname Saturday ~ BANGS of Plymouth and Eastham, Massachusetts

Capt. Jonathan Bangs, Ancient Burial Ground,
Brewster, Massachusetts on Cape Cod


The third ship to arrive in Plymouth Colony, after the Mayflower and the Fortune, was the Anne in 1623.  My 9th great grandfather, Edward Bangs (1591 – 1678) was on board the Anne, and he received four acres of land.  In the 1627 Plymouth division of cattle, Edward Bangs was the 13th person in the 12th company list.  He was a freeman in 1633.   In 1635 he was on the staff of Governor Bradford of the Plymouth Colony, and is listed along with Captain Myles Standish (another one of my ancestors),  Thomas Prence, John Howland (also my ancestor), John Alden and Stephen Hopkins.

 By 1645 Edward Bangs had removed to Eastham, further out on Cape Cod. He was an innkeeper, and called “yeoman” in records.  In 1657 he became licensed as a merchant in Eastham, and was engaged in trade.  I descend from his youngest son, Jonathan Bangs (1644 – 1728) who was born in Plymouth and lived on his father’s farm in Eastham, and later in Harwich.  He was Captain of the local militia, a farmer and a member of the legislator.  Jonathan’s gravestone (see the photo above) names him as Captain.  His two older brothers left on descendants, but Jonathan had three wives and twelve children.

My 7th great grandmother was Hannah Bangs (1676 – 1715).  She married John Crosby of Harwich and had six children.  This was the last generation in this lineage to live on Cape Cod, because her oldest son, my 6th great grandfather, Jonathan Crosby, removed to Yarmouth, Nova Scotia.

For more information on the BANGS family:

Dawes-Gates Ancestral Lines, by Mary Walton Ferris

The Great Migration Begins, by Robert Charles Anderson, Volume 1

The History and Genealogy of the Bangs Family in America, by Dean Dudley

My BANGS genealogy:

Generation 1:  Edward Bangs, son of John Bangs and Jane Chavis, born 28 October 1591 in Panfield, Braintree, Essex, England, died 16 Feb 1678 in Eastham, Massachusetts; married first about 1633 to Lydia Hicks, daughter of Robert Hicks, one children.  Married second before 1636 in Eastham, Massachusetts to Rebecca, possibly the daughter of Edmund Hobart and Margaret Dewey, mother of 8 more Bangs children. 

Generation 2:  Jonathan Bangs , born 16 July 1644 in Plymouth, Massachusetts, died 9 November 1728 in Brewster, Massachusetts; married first on 16 July 1664 in Eastham to Mary Mayo, daughter of Samuel May and Thomasine Lumpkin, mother of 12 children. Married second to Sarah Unknown, and married third in 1720 to Ruth Cole, widow of John Young.

Generation 3:  Hannah Bangs, born 14 March 1676 in Eastham, died 1715; married about 1703 to John Crosby, son of Thomas Crosby and Sarah Unknown.  He was born 4 December 1670 in Eastham, died 25 May 1717 in Harwich, Massachusetts.  Six children.

Generation 4:  Jonathan Crosby m. Hannah Hamblin
Generation 5:  Ebenezer Crosby m. Elizabeth Robinson
Generation 6:  Rebecca Crosby m. Comfort Haley
Generation 7:  Joseph Edwin Healy m. Matilda Weston
Generation 8:  Mary Etta Healey m. Peter Hoogerzeil
Generation 9:  Florence Etta Hoogerzeil m. Arthur Treadwell Hitchings
Generation 10.  Gertrude Matilda Hitchings m. Stanley Elmer Allen (my grandparents)

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, “Surname Saturday ~ BANGS of Eastham and Plymouth, Massachusetts”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted June 23, 2018, (  https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/06/surname-saturday-bangs-of-plymouth-and.html: accessed [access date]). 

Wednesday, June 20, 2018

Weathervane Wednesday ~ Above a Fishing Shack in Maine

I post another in a series of weather vane photographs every Wednesday.  This started with images of weathervanes from the Londonderry, New Hampshire area, but now I've found interesting weather vanes all across New England and across the globe.  Sometimes my weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are interesting.  Often my readers tip me off to some very unique or unusual weathervanes, too!  If you know a great weather vane near you, let me know if you'd like to have it featured on this blog.

Today's weather vane was photographed in Maine.

Do you know the location of weathervane post #368?  Scroll down to find the answer.





This little fishing shack is located in Popham Beach, Maine.  It's so close to the road you can reach out and touch it as you drive by (the third photo above was taken from the driver's side window).    The three dimensional fish weathervane above the shack's cupola is very similar to the fish weathervanes seen down the street above the Popham Chapel and the Popham Chapel house.  Click HERE and  HERE to see those weathervanes and compare for yourself!

This shack is located a few hundred yards from the marker for the Popham Colony.  This colonial settlement was founded in 1607 and abandoned a year later.  The first ship built by the English in the New World was built at that time, and sailed back to England.  This ship was the Virginia of Sagadahoc.  You can see a replica in nearby Phippsburg, Maine.  This site was rediscovered by an archaeological dig that continued from 1994 to 2005. A historical marker was installed on the waterfront near this fishing shack.

Click here to see ALLof  the past 368 "Weathervane Wednesday" posts:

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday~  Above a Fishing Shack in Maine", Nutfield Genealogy, posted June 20, 2018, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/06/weathervane-wednesday-above-fishing.html: accessed [access date]). 

Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Two Lyford Children buried at Pittsfield, New Hampshire

This tombstone was photographed at The Old Meeting House Cemetery in Pittsfield, New Hampshire


    NANCY                                           JEREMIAH
Daughter of                                          Son of    
Dudley &                                           Dudley &
Nancy Lyford                                  Nancy Lyford
died                                                died
Feb. 17, 1840                                  Apri 6, 1815
aged 17 yrs.                                      AE. 7 yrs




Dudley Lyford, son of Dudley Lyford and Sarah Cram, was born 12 August 1775 in Pittsfield, New Hampshire, and died there on 4 December 1840.  His original name was Oliver, but his father died when he was only three years old and his mother named him Dudley after his father.   He married Nancy Green about 1814 in Pittsfield.  She was born 15 November 1783 in Pittsfield.  Dudley was a tanner, and was a Colonel in the 18th Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 1st Division of the New Hampshire Militia (men from Nottingham, Deerfield, Epsom, Northwood and Pittsfield, New Hampshire). 

They had 10 children:
1.  Eliza Blake, b. 1803 m. James McCrillis
2.  Oliver Smith, b. 1805
3.  Jeremiah Green, b. 1808 d. 1815
4.  Sarah Fogg, b. 1810 m. Jeremiah Cross
5.   Mehitable, b. 1812 d. 1813
6.   John Cram, b. 1814
7.  Mehitable Green, b. 1816 m. Daniel Babb
8.  Francis Hubbard, b. 1820
9.  Nancy Green, b. 1822, d. 1840
10. Jeremiah Dudley, b. 1825 d. 1864 in the Civil War

Source:

Essex Institute Historical Collections, Volume 38, page 66

See also:
Francis Lyford of Boston and Exeter and some of his descendants, by William Lewis Welch, 1902



--------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday ~ Two Lyford Children buried at Pittsfield, New Hampshire", Nutfield Genealogy, posted June 19, 2018, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/06/tombstone-tuesday-two-lyford-children.html: accessed [access date]).

Monday, June 18, 2018

Colonial Boston in Miniature and in Giant Murals (in the same spot!)

1622 William Blaxton on the Shawmut Peninsula

On Newbury Street, right across from the New England Historic Genealogical Society, is the old New England Life Building.  It is known as The Newbry today. The main entrance is on 501 Boylston Street, but if you enter by the Newbury Street side and look to your left and to your right, there are four small dioramas set into the walls.  Each tiny masterpiece displays a scene from the origins of colonial Boston.  At the Boylston Street entrance is a massive lobby with eight murals showing Boston History up until the Revolutionary War (1622 – 1798).



The Boston Society of Natural History existed from 1830  until 1948 in Boston.  It was located in the financial district, and in 1864 it moved to 234 Berkeley Street in the new Back Bay neighborhood created by a massive landfill project.  The society evolved later into what is now the Boston Museum of Science, and removed from Back Bay to Cambridge.

These four intricate dioramas were built for the Boston Society of Natural History in 1863.  This museum was right on this block at the corner of Boylston and Berkeley Streets, and it is now recently the Louis Boston building, and is now a branch store of Restoration Hardware.  These miniature scenes were created by a woman, Sarah Ann Rockwell, and the painted backgrounds were done by Henry Brooks.  The first diorama displays a scene from pre-colonial contact, with Native Americans setting fish weirs in Back Bay. The second shows William Blaxton (AKA Blackstone) and his little settlement on the Shawmut peninsula. The third shows workers filling in Back Bay in 1858.  The fourth shows the miniature Boston Society of Natural History building described above, and Rogers Hall, which was the first MIT building in Back Bay (1866 – 1938).

Native American fishing weirs in Back Bay

1858 filling in Back Bay

1866 The Boston Society of Natural Science and MIT's Rogers Building
 According to the book Boston Curiosities, Sarah Ann Rockwell was a perfectionist.  She took two weeks to make a human diorama figure and a month to make a tiny horse. She researched the history of Back Bay, and even used original blueprints of the buildings in the fourth diorama to create the mini structures.

Charles Constantin Joseph Hoffbauer (1875 – 1957) was a French born Beaux Arts artist who worked for Disney and created several famous murals, including the mural inside the Battle Abbey in Richmond, Virginia started in 1913, and finished after he served for France in World War I.  Hoffbauer was hired by New England Life to create the murals for their new lobby.  He spent five months in Boston researching the local history.  Then he painted these murals in Hollywood, California and they were installed in Boston in May 1942 for a convention, then removed for final details and reinstalled four months later.  Hoffbauer became an American citizen in 1941, and later lived in Rockport, Massachusetts.



Building the USS Constitution
The Winthrop Fleet

This lobby is open to the public, but I always ask the guard at the lobby desk for permission to linger and loiter.  Most people rush right past these works of art to the elevators, but if you want to take in all the details you will be here for at least a few minutes, if not more!

For more information:

Boston Curiosities:  Quirky Characters, Roadside Oddities, and other Offbeat Stuff, by Bruce Gellerman and Erik Sherman, Morris Book Publishing, Guilford, CT, 2010.

Charles Hoffbauer at Wikipedia:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Hoffbauer 

(I could find no information about artist Sarah Ann Rockwell online)

-----------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Colonial Boston in Miniature and in Giant Murals (in the same spot!)", Nutfield Genealogy, posted June 18, 2018, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/06/colonial-boston-in-miniature-and-in.html: accessed [access date]). 

Saturday, June 16, 2018

Surname Saturday ~ GARDNER of Gloucester, Massachusetts


GARDNER / GARDINER / GARNER


 Very, very little is known of my 8th great grandfather, James Gardner (about 1641 – 1684) who appears first in the Gloucester, Massachusetts records in 1661 when William Vinson deeded him some land.  He settled in the most eastern section of the Gloucester peninsula according to John J. Babson in his History of the Town of Gloucester, 1860.   He next appears in the vital records in 1661 when he married Elizabeth Vinson, daughter of the William mentioned above.  They had ten children together and both died rather young in 1684. 

I descend from James Gardner, Jr., my 7th great grandfather, who was the youngest child, not even four years old when his parents died.  James had five children with his wife Abigail (maiden name unknown) all born in Gloucester.  Again, I descend from the youngest child, Eunice, born in 1724, my 6th great grandmother, who married Jeremiah Allen from Manchester, Massachusetts. 

I have two other GARDNER lineages.  One is from Thomas Gardner at this link:  https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2015/01/surname-saturday-gardner-of-salem.html
and the other is a brickwall ancestor in Salem, Massachusetts:  https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/03/surname-saturday-gardner-of-boston.html 

My GARDNER genealogy:

Generation 1:   James Gardner, born about 1641, died 8 December 1684 in Gloucester, Massachusetts; married on 19 June 1662 in Gloucester to Elizabeth Vinson, daughter of William Vinson and Sarah Unknown. She was born 16 May 1644 in Gloucester, and died 4 March 1684 in Gloucester. Ten children.

Generation 2:  James Gardner, born 27 August 1681 in Gloucester, married Abigail Unknown.  Five children. 

Generation 3:  Eunice Gardner, born 18 March 1724 in Gloucester; married on 17 June 1748 in Manchester, Massachusetts to Jeremiah Allen, son of Jeremiah Allen and Lydia Tuck.  He was born 6 April 1728 in Manchester and probably died in Nova Scotia. Eight children.

Generation 4:  Abigail Allen m. Comfort Haley
Generation 5:  Comfort Haley m. Rebecca Crosby
Generation 6:  Joseph Edwin Healy m. Matilda Weston
Generation 7:  Mary Etta Healey m. Peter Hoogerzeil
Generation 8:  Florence Etta Hoogerzeil m. Arthur Treadwell Hitchings
Generation 9: Gertrude Matilda Hitchings m. Stanley Elmer Allen (my grandparents)

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, “Surname Saturday ~ GARDNER of Gloucester, Massachusetts”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted June 16, 2018, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/06/surname-saturday-gardner-of-gloucester.html: accessed [access date]). 

Wednesday, June 13, 2018

Weathervane Wednesday ~ A Fish by the Sea (Actually, Two Fish!)

I post another in a series of weather vane photographs every Wednesday.  This started with images of weathervanes from the Londonderry, New Hampshire area, but now I've found interesting weather vanes all across New England and across the globe.  Sometimes my weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are interesting.  Often my readers tip me off to some very unique or unusual weathervanes, too!  If you know a great weather vane near you, let me know if you'd like to have it featured on this blog.

Today's weather vane was photographed in Maine.

Do you know the location of weathervane post #367?  Scroll down to find the answer.


Popham Chapel at Popham Beach, Maine

Now, look carefully at the house behind the chapel.  See the fish above the house?




These two weathervanes are located side by side in Popham Beach, Maine.  The chapel is right by the road, and the chapel house is set back behind the library next door.  Both are similar three dimensional fish weathervanes, with very slight variations.  The weathervane on the steeple of the chapel is much bigger.

Popham Chapel was built over 120 years ago.  It was renovated by the community after it fell into disrepair during the Great Depression years.  In 1988 the community also bought the house next door and turned it into the Popham Chapel House.  The Ladies of Popham Circle continue to raise funds for the upkeep of these buildings and community outreach.  Please see their website below.

Popham Chapel "The Little Church by the Bay"  http://pophamchapel.org/index.html    

Click on the link below to see all the weathervanes featured at "Weathervane Wednesday":
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/search/label/Weathervane%20Wednesday 


----------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~ A Fish by the Sea (Actually, Two Fish!)", Nutfield Genealogy, posted June 13, 2018, (  https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/06/weathervane-wednesday-fish-by-sea.html: accessed [access date]).

Tuesday, June 12, 2018

Tombstone Tuesday ~ John Bell, Irish Immigrant, died in Bedford, NH 1767

This Tombstone is from the Old Burial Ground in Bedford, New Hampshire.


HERE LYES THE                                  HERE LIES THE
BODY OF MRS KATHE                 BODY OF MR. JOHN
RINE BELL SHE DIED JAN                  BELL DIED FEBRUARY
9TH 1746 AGED 49 YEARS                 2, 1765 AGED 67 YEARS
---------------------------- 0------------------------------
OUR BODYS TURNED ARE TO DUST OUR DUST IT SHALL RISE
GOD  THIS POUER WILL RAISE THE JUST
TO CELEBRATE HIS PRAISE

According to the History of Bedford and also Bolton's Immigrants to New England 1700 - 1775, John Bell was an immigrant from Ireland around 1736.  His wife, Katherine and his four children arrived in 1739. 

Other early Bell tombstones photographed in Bedford:

https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/11/tombstone-tuesday-john-bell-and.html 

and also "One stone for seven Bell children":

https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2015/08/tombstone-tuesday-one-stone-for-seven.html

 -------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday  ~ John Bell, Irish Immigrant, died in Bedford, NH 1767", Nutfield Genealogy, posted June 12, 2018, (https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/06/tombstone-tuesday-john-bell-irish.html: accessed [access date]).

Saturday, June 9, 2018

Surname Saturday ~ CLEMENTS of Haverhill, Massachusetts


CLEMONS /  CLEMMINS / CLEMONTS / CLEMONS

The first of the Clements family to come to America was Job Clements, son of Robert Clements, who came to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1639.  Soon after his wife, Lydia died in 1642 in England, Robert Clements came to New England permanently with his sons Job and John, and his daughters Sarah and Lydia.  He left behind two older sons, and a five year old Mary who eventually came to Massachusetts and married John Osgood. Her brother, John Clements, married Sarah Osgood, John’s sister. In 1692 Mary (Clements) Osgood was accused of witchcraft and confessed.  Several months later she recanted, saying she was forced to confess. She remained in prison until early 1693 when she was ordered to be released. 

Robert first lived at Salisbury, and then removed further inland and up the Merrimack River to Haverhill.  The Deed for Haverhill was signed in 1642 by six men, including Robert Clements and Reverend John Ward.  Clements is listed with he first 32 grantees in 1645, the same year he built the first grist mill.  He served as a representative to the General Court and as a Judge for Norfolk County. 

One of Robert Clements’ descendants was Samuel Langhorne Clemens (1835 – 1910), also known as the famous author Mark Twain.  You can read about this connection in the article by Frank Emerson, “Mark Twain and his Connection to the Clemens and Emersons of Haverhill” The Essex Genealogist, August 199, pages 139 – 142.  I descend from both the Clements and Emerson families, too!

I descend from Robert Clements’ daughter Sarah (1626 – 1694) who married Abraham Morrill of Salisbury, Massachusetts.  You can read more about the MORRILL family at this link:

  
Some CLEMENTS family resources:

Ancestors and Descendants of Robert Clements, by P.W. Clement, 1927, pages 13-30

Dawes-Gates Ancestral Lines, by Mary Walton Ferris, vol. 1 (1943) and vol. 2 (1931)

Jeanie Thornton Roberts, “Robert Clement of Haverhill”, The Family Connection blog, posted January 2012, accessed 23 May 2018

Essex Antiquarian, Volume 7 (1903), page 158 for the will of Robert Clements of Haverhill.

My CLEMENTS genealogy:

Generation 1:  Robert Clements, son of Richard Clements and Agnes Unknown,  was baptized on 14 December 1595 in Cosby, Leicestershire, England, died 29 September 1658 in Haverhill, Massachusetts; married first  to Lydia Unknown.  She died 12 March 1642 in Ansley, Warwickshire, England; married second to Judith Unknown.   Judith remarried to John Whitney in 1659.  Eight Clements children with Lydia.

Generation 2:  Sarah Clements, born about 1626 in Ansley, died August 1694 in Salem, Massachusetts; married on 10 June 1645 in Salisbury, Massachusetts to Abraham Morrill.  He was born about 1615 in England and died 20 June 1662 in Roxbury, Massachusetts. Sarah married second to Thomas Mudgett on 8 October 1665 in Salisbury.  Nine Morrill children.

Generation 3:  Isaac Morrill m. Phebe Gill
Generation 4:  Mary Morrell m. George Tuck
Generation 5:  Lydia Tuck m. Jeremiah Allen
Generation 6:  Jeremiah Allen m. Eunice Gardner
Generation 7:  Abigail Allen m. Comfort Haley
Generation 8:  Comfort Haley m. Rebecca Crosby
Generation 9:  Joseph Edwin Healy m. Matilda Weston
Generation 10:  Mary Etta Healey m. Peter Hoogerzeil
Generation 11:  Florence Etta Hoogerzeil m. Arthur Treadwell Hitchings
Generation 12:  Gertrude Matilda Hitchings m. Stanley Elmer Allen (my grandparents)

--------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, “Surname Saturday ~ CLEMENTS of Haverhill, Massachusetts”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted June 9, 2018, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/06/surname-saturday-clements-of-haverhill.html: accessed [access date]). 

Wednesday, June 6, 2018

Weathervane Wednesday ~ Weathervanes of Amsterdam

I post another in a series of weather vane photographs every Wednesday.  This started with images of weathervanes from the Londonderry, New Hampshire area, but now I've found interesting weather vanes all across New England and across the globe.  Sometimes my weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are interesting.  Often my readers tip me off to some very unique or unusual weathervanes, too!  If you know a great weather vane near you, let me know if you'd like to have it featured on this blog.

Today's eight weather vanes were all photographed in Amsterdam in The Netherlands while I was on my recent tour with the General Society of Mayflower Descendants.  Since life in Holland is dependent on the weather, and since there are so many boats (many were formerly sailboats) on the rivers, canals and harbors, Amsterdam was full of great weathervanes.  Here are only a few of the ones we saw on our tour by foot, bus, and canal boat.

 Weathervane post #366

A merman with a shield, see on the church below

The Dutch Republic Lion weathervane on the
Amsterdam "Centraal" train station downtown
Another view of the same
weathervane in the rain

Amsterdam "Centraal" Train station, the weathervane is barely visible!

This ship weathervane is above a visitor center downtown on a canal

The birds were enjoying this banner weathervane on a church

A weathercock on a Protestant chuch


Another banner weathervane seen from the canal boat
The weathervane above is atop that turret on the right side of the photo
An interesting old banner weathervane
with a counterweight on the right
The weathervane above is atop that
church steeple high above the crowds
in downtown Amsterdam

This gilded ship weathervane is very detailed!
I love the crow's nest, and the planking on the hull



Click here to see the entire collection of Weathervane Wednesday posts!

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~  Weathervanes of Amsterdam", Nutfield Genealogy, posted June 6, 2018, (  https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/06/weathervane-wednesday-weathervanes-of.html: accessed [access date]). 

Tuesday, June 5, 2018

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Mariah (Eaton) Parker, d. 1826, Reading, Massachusetts

This tombstone was photographed at Laurel Hill Cemetery in Reading, Massachusetts


ERECTED
IN
Memory of
Mrs.
MARIAH E. PARKER
~ Consort of Mr.
Gould Parker ~ 
who died July 10, 1826,
in the 22, year of her age.
------+-------
Faith led her gently downward to the tomb,
While fix'd on heav'n her meek, yet steady eye
Pierc'd the thick shade that deepen'd
round its gloom,
And caught a gleam of glory from 
on high.


Gould Parker, son of Colonel Nathan Parker and Lydia Stearns, was born in 1804.  He married Mariah Eaton on 16 December 1824, just a year and a half before she died of consumption.  Gould Parker remarried second to Mary Flint in 1829. 

Mariah, baptized in Reading on 25 November 1804 was the daughter of Timothy Eaton and Lydia Bachelor, who were married in Reading on 16 June 1791.  

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday ~ Mariah (Eaton) Parker, d. 1826, Reading, Massachusetts", Nutfield Genealogy, posted June 5, 2018, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/06/tombstone-tuesday-mariah-eaton-parker-d.html: accessed [access date]).

Monday, June 4, 2018

Megan Markle’s New Hampshire Roots



Did you know that Megan Markle’s paternal grandmother, Doris Mary Rita Sanders (born about 1920), daughter of Fred George Sanders and Gertrude May Merrill,  was born in New Hampshire? She has a New Hampshire lineage that goes back for another ten generations in New Hampshire!

I won’t give her entire family tree here, since it is easily seen online at the resources listed below, and also since it would be enormous!  But I will tell you a little about Meghan’s New Hampshire ancestors.   The newspapers recently were all aflutter about Meghan’s Wentworth and Hussey shared ancestry with her husband Harry, but that goes back more than fifteen generations before they share an ancestor.  You might be even more closely related to the new royal bride if you match some of this New Hampshire ancestry.

From the lists of surnames below, I can see that I share common ancestors with Meghan through BURNHAM, PAGE, BATCHELDER, SANBORN, TAYLOR, SWETT, STACY and GODFREY, and kinship with a few other New Hampshire surnames.

Are these surnames in your New Hampshire family tree?  If so, you might be a cousin!  I’ve listed the surnames in Meghan’s family tree, and the immigrant ancestors of those surnames.

SMITH from Center Harbor, Meredith and Hampton (immigrant ancestor John Smith abt. 1616 – 1674)
MUDGETT  from New Hampton and Brentwood  (immigrant Thomas Mudgett abt. 1640 – 1701)
DRAKE from Holderness and Hampton (Abraham Drake 1623 – 1709)
MERRILL from Plymouth and Holderness (untraced before 1768)
HUCKINS from Gilmanton, Madbury and Durham (Oyster River) (Robert Huckins 1620 – 1694)
BICKFORD from Newington and Dover (John Bickford 1607 – 1677)
PAGE from Hampton  (Robert Page 1604 – 1679)
HOBBS from Hampton (Morris Hobbs 1615 – 1706)
SHAW from Cambridge MA and Hampton, NH (Roger Shaw 1600 – 1661)
BATCHELDER from Hampton (Rev. Stephen Batchelder 1561 – 1656)
DOW from Hampton (Henry Dow 1605 – 1659)
TAYLOR from Hampton (Anthony Taylor 1607 – 1687)
GODFREY from Hampton (William Godfrey d.1671)
HUSSEY from Hampton ( Christopher Hussey 1598 – 1685)
SANBORN from Hampton (John Sanborn 1588 – 1650)
MEAD (untraced before Hannah Mead m. Joseph Mudgett b. 1731)
SCRIBNER from Dover  (John Scriven (1623 – 1675)
SWETT from Hampton (Benjamin Swett 1624 – 1677)
THOMAS from Durham (Oyster River) (James Thomas (1642 – 1718)
GODDARD from Durham (Oyster River)  (John Goddard (1608 – 1666)
TIBBETTS from Dover (Jeremiah Tibbetts 1631 – 1677)
BENMORE from Dover (Philip Benmore 1630 – 1676)
ADAMS from Durham (Charles Adams (1621 – 1694)
WEARE from Nantucket and Hampton (Nathaniel Weare 1605 – 1681)
ROBIE from Hampton (Henry Robie)

------------------------

Some of Meghan’s Essex County, Massachusetts ancestors:
LEE from Manchester
KILHAM from Wenham
LUNT from Newbury
BROWNE from Newbury
EATON from Salisbury and Haverhill
ROWLANDSON from Lancaster and Salisbury
WORTHEN (untraced)
TILTON from Lynn
BURNHAM from Ipswich
FRENCH from Salisbury
STACY from Salisbury
CARTER from Woburn
WHITCHER/WHITTIER from Salisbury, MA and Chester, NH
ELLSWORTH (untraced before Jeremiah Ellsworth 1692 – 1779 m. Hannah Tenney of Rowley, MA)

Some of the many online sources for Meghan’s ancestry:


from Fame Chain  http://www.famechain.com/  

A chart of Meghan and Harry’s shared ancestry:


------------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Megan Markle’s New Hampshire Roots", Nutfield Genealogy, posted June 4, 2018, (https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/06/megan-markles-new-hampshire-roots.html: accessed [access date]).

Saturday, June 2, 2018

Surname Saturday ~ Morrill of Cambridge and Salisbury, Massachusetts


MORRILL /  MORRELL /  MORELL

My 10th great grandfather, Abraham Morrill (about 1615 – 1662) may have come to New England from England with his older brother Isaac Morrill aboard the ship Lyon in 1632, but we have no record.  He was probably underage because only adult men signed the Oath of Allegiance.  By 1634 he was paying taxes in Cambridge, Massachusetts.  His first grant of land in Cambridge was on 20 August 1635. 

By 1640 Abraham Morrill was granted land in Salisbury, Massachusetts.  In 1645 he married Sarah Clement of Salisbury, the daughter of Robert Clement of Haverhill.  They had nine children all born in Salisbury.  The last child, a daughter named Hepzibah, was born several months after Abraham’s early death. He was buried in Roxbury, where his brother Isaac’s family lived, and the record states “Abraham Morrell of Salisbury fell sick in this town & died & was buried upon the 20th of the 4th [1662]” [Roxbury Church Records 177].

Abraham’s wife, Sarah Clement, was the sister to Mary (Clement) Osgood, who was accused of witchcraft in 1692 and spent three months in jail.  Sarah married second to Thomas Mudgett in 1665. Sarah died two years after the witch trials, and thirty two years after her first husband, Abraham Morrill. 

I descend from Abraham and Sarah’s oldest son Isaac Morrill (1646 – 1713).  He was a resident of Salisbury, married Phebe Gill and had three children.  My 8th great grandmother was Mary Morrell, wife of George Tuck of Beverly, Massachusetts.

Some MORRILL resources:

Great Migration: Immigrants to New England 1634 -1635, by Robert Charles Anderson, Volume 5, pages 153 – 156 – a lengthy sketch on Abraham Morrill.

Ancestors and Descendants of Robert Clements, by Mary Lovering Holman and Caroline Clement Brown, pages 25 -30. 

My MORRILL genealogy:

Generation 1:   Abraham Morrill, born about 1615 in England, died 20 June 1662 in Roxbury, Massachusetts; married on 10 June 1645 in Salisbury, Massachusetts to Sarah Clements, daughter of Robert Clement and Lydia Drummer.  She was born about 1626 in Ansley, Warwick, England, and died August 1694 in Salisbury.  Nine MORRILL children.  She married second on 8 October 1665 in Salisbury to Thomas Mudgett.

Generation 2:  Isaac Morrill, born 10 July 1646 in Salisbury, died 17 October 1713; married on 14 November 1670 in Salisbury to Phebe Gill, daughter of John Gill and Phebe Buswell.  Three children.

Generation 3: Mary Morrell, born 10 September 1689 in Salisbury, died December 1750 in Beverly, Massachusetts; married about 1701 in Beverly to George Tuck, son of John Tuck and Rachel Unknown.  He was born 11 October 1678 in Beverly, and died 8 May 1751 in Beverly. Nine children.

Generation 4: Lydia Tuck m. Jeremiah Allen
Generation 5:  Jeremiah Allen m. Eunice Gardner
Generation 6: Abigail Allen m. Comfort Haley
Generation 7:  Comfort Haley m. Rebecca Crosby
Generation 8: Joseph Edwin Healy m. Matilda Weston
Generation 9: Mary Etta Healey m. Peter Hoogerzeil
Generation 10:  Florence Etta Hoogerzeil m. Arthur Treadwell Hitchings
Generation 11:  Gertrude Matilda Hitchings m. Stanley Elmer Allen (my grandparents)

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, “Surname Saturday ~ Morrill of Cambridge and Salisbury, Massachusetts”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted June 2, 2018, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/06/surname-saturday-morrill-of-cambridge.html: accessed [access date]). 

Friday, June 1, 2018

Why do we say “Rabbit, Rabbit, Rabbit” on the 1st of each month?


"Even Mr. Roosevelt, the President of the United States, has confessed to a friend that he says 'Rabbits' on the first of every month—and, what is more, he would not think of omitting the utterance on any account." – Newspaper article, The Nottingham Evening Post, 27 November, 1935.



I always say “Rabbit” three times on the first day of the month.  I try to make it the first thing I say that morning.  It goes back to my childhood. When I was a little girl, I never knew what the day of the month it was until I got to school.  But on the first of the month it would be a contest to see who would remember first.  Usually some other kid would shout it out while walking to school, and we’d all repeat it to the next kid we saw. And so it would travel through the neighborhood.

Now I post it every month on Facebook. If you are a Facebook friend, you know I also put up a picture of a rabbit, too.  Or three rabbits. I didn’t know why we say it three times. I didn’t know why we say it in the first place.  Finally, fellow genealogist Dan Young asked me, “Do you have a blog post on the history of why we say Rabbit?”

So here it is- the reason why we say “Rabbit, rabbit, rabbit”!

It turns out to be a British custom that was carried to North America.  Over there people say “Rabbits” or “White Rabbits” or repeat “Rabbit” some number of times for good luck in the new month.  According to Wikipedia, northern New England is where this custom is most prevalent in the USA.  In Britain, It is more common in Scotland than in England.

Rabbits are considered lucky in the British Isles- think of the lucky rabbit’s foot. Rabbits are a tradition sign of fertility (remember the Playboy symbol?). White rabbits are especially lucky or magical, and we all know this from the color of most magician’s rabbits. One of the articles I linked below said that FDR not only said Rabbits on the first of the month, but he carried a rabbit’s foot in his pocket for good luck.  Maybe he was just super superstitious?

What is the symbolism of the “Three Hares” often seen carved on churches in England or medieval manuscripts? Well, according to Wikipedia again, it is also seen all over Europe and the Middle East. Is it a symbol of the trinity?  Is it from the pagan Celts? This symbol appears to be a puzzle, just like the fact that although each of the three rabbits appears to have two ears, there are only a total of three ears.  Check out the website for the Three Hare Project, which has published a new book on this subject:


The Three Hares: A Curiosity Worth Regarding, by Tom Greeves, Sue Andrew and Chris Chapman, Skerryvore Productions,UK, 2016



Variations on this theme:

Be the first to say “Rabbit” for good luck
It must be the first words spoken aloud that morning
If you repeat the word “Rabbit” the rabbit will run away with your problems
If you forget to say rabbit first thing, reverse your bad luck by saying “Tibbar” before bed.
Drink a Rabbit Rabbit beer from New England’s Lamplighter Brewing Co. (Cambridge, MA)
Buy a dress from the fashion company Rabbit Rabbit Rabbit  Designs (Google it!)
Gilda Radner used the “Bunny Bunny” version every month

For the truly curious:

From NPR’s “A Way with Words”

Mother Nature - 



Bangor, Maine Bangor Daily News

Rabbit Rabbit Day on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/RabbitRabbitDay/  


The Three Hares from Wikipedia- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_hares 

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Why do we say “Rabbit, Rabbit, Rabbit” on the 1st of each month?", Nutfield Genealogy, posted June 1, 2018, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/06/why-do-we-say-rabbit-rabbit-rabbit-on.html: accessed [access date]). 

Thursday, May 31, 2018

June 2018 Genealogy and Local History Calendar



For last minute updates, see the “Nutfield Genealogy” Facebook page at this link:  https://www.facebook.com/nutfield.gen/    Please send new events to me by commenting here at the end of this post, or email vrojomit@gmail.com  



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June FREE Fun Fridays, sponsored by the Highland Street Foundation. For a full listing see http://www.highlandstreet.org/programs/free-fun-fridays

June 29th – MIT Museum in Cambridge, MA
                  Nantucket Whaling Museum in Nantucket, MA
                  Concord Museum in Concord, MA
                  Edward Gorey House in Yarmouthport, MA
                  The Mount:  Edith Wharton’s House in Lenox, MA


June 1, Friday, noon, American Passage:  The History of Ellis Island, a First Friday lecture at the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts. Presented by Dr. Vincent J. Cannato.  Free to the public.

June 1, Friday, 7pm, Shadows Fall North Documentary and Discussion, at the Warner Town Hall, 5 East Main Street, Warner, New Hampshire.  This documentary fcuses on the preservationists and activists Valerie Cunningham of Portsmouth and JerriAnne Boggis of Milford, New Hampshire, who tell the stories of people who have been rendered nearly invisible in the historical record.  Also will be held June 10 in Newbury, New Hampshire. Free to the public. 

June 2 and 3, Saturday and Sunday, Scottish Heritage Weekend: Culloden at the Fort at No. 4, Charlestown, New Hampshire. This event includes a battle re-enactment.  Family Friendly.  Included with admission to the fort.  http://fortat4.org/calendar.php

June 2, Saturday, 10am, Down at the Landing: Maritime Trades in Early Colonial Times, at the Old Berwick Historical Society, 2 Liberty Street, South Berwick, Maine. Join in a tour of the Counting House Museum, see demonstrators of maritime trades (a cooper, a ropemaker, rigger, and a ship doctor).  Free admission.

June 2 and 3, Saturday and Sunday, 8am – 4pm, 3rd Annual Dublin Vintage Market, at 1716 Main Street, Dublin, New Hampshire. 150 Vendors of Antiques, vintage finds, repurposed goods, local artisans and salvaged junk.  Kid friendly exhibits, live animals, vintage camper and classic car/truck displays and live music.  $5 per person, kids under 12 are free.  Free parking.

June 2, Saturday, 10am – 3pm, Chinese American Experiences Mass. Memories Road Show, at the Pao Arts Center, 99 Albany Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Hosted by the Chinese Historical Society of New England and the Mass. Memories Road Show.  All ages may participate, families are encouraged to come together. Attendees under 18 must have a waiver signed by a guardian. Celebrate Chinese American Experiences in Massachusetts by digitizing family photos and stories. Images will be added to the digital collection at openarchives.umb.edu

June 2, Saturday, 10:30am, Historic Preservation Tours with Dr. Richard M. Candee, at the Discover Portsmouth Center, 10 Middle Street, Portsmouth, New Hampshire. $25 adults, $15 members.  http://portsmouthhistory.org/portsmouth-advocates/     

June 2, Saturday, 2:30 pm, Boston Abolitionists Performance, at the Durant-Kenrick House, 286 Waverly Avenue, Newton, Massachusetts.  Actors will portray Lydia Maria Child, David Walker, William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, Maria W. Stewart, and Newton’s own John Kenrick.  $20 per person, $15 for Historic Newton members.
June 3, Sunday, 6pm, Haunted York Village Tour, at the York Town Hall, 186 York Street, York, Maine.  A 90 minute tour with author Roxie J. Zwicker.  Tickets at https://newenglandcuriosities.com/

June 3, Sunday, 7pm, Songs of Emigration:  Storytelling Through Traditional Irish Music, at the South Eaton Meetinghouse, 402 Burnham Road, Eaton, New Hampshire.  Presented by musician Jordan Tirrell-Wysocki with fiddle and guitar.  Free to the public.

June 5, Tusday 10 - 11:30am, Scanned Document Images, at the Wilmington Memorial Library, 175 Middlesex Avenue, Wilmington, Massachusetts.  Learn how to remove/fix documents with free image processing software.  Free to the public. Presented by Bernie Lyons. Pre-register at https://wilmlibrary.assabetinteractive.com/calendar/genealogy/ 

June 5, Tuesday, 6:30pm, Paul Revere: A Man of Many Occupations, at the Old North Church & Historic Site, 193 Salem, Street, Boston, Massachusetts, and also hosted by the Paul Revere House. Speakers will be Patrick Leehey, Nan Woverton, and Rob Martello.  Donations accepted.

June 5, Tuesday, 7pm, Family Stories: How and Why to Remember and Tell Them, at the Abbie Greenleaf Library, 439 Main Street, Franconia, New Hampshire.  Presented by Jo Radner.  Free to the public.

June 6, Wednesday, 10am, New Visitor Tour of the New England Historic Genealogical Society Library, at 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Free orientation and tour of the NEHGS research facility.  Attendees are invited to stay and use the facility following the tour.  No registration necessary.

June 6, Wednesday, noon, Behind-the-Scenes Library Tour, at the Maine Historical Society, 489 Congress Street, Portland, Maine.  A 45 minute tour of the history of the building, architectural details, the basics of doing research, and treasures from the collections. Free to the public. Limited to 10.  Save a spot by emailing Nicholas Noyes at nnoyes@mainhistory.org 

June 6, Wednesday, 6pm, Celebrate Boston!  Quiz night at the Old South Meeting House, at 310 Washington Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  A local history trivia contest with a Dorchester neighborhood theme.  Bring your family and friends to form a team.  Great prizes!  Food from Dorchester restaurants, cash bar.  $15 tickets, $10 for students, $5 for OSMH members.  Get tickets here:  https://celebrateboston2018.brownpapertickets.com/ 

June 6, Wednesday, 7pm, A House on the Bay: Life on the 17th Century New Hampshire Coastal Frontier, at the Kensington Grange Hall, 133 Amesbury Road, Kensington, New Hampshire. Presented by Neill DePaoli about the archaeological discovery of the home of Thomas Wiggin on the Great Bay.  Free to the public.

June 6, Wednesday, 7pm, New Hampshire’s One-Room Rural Schools:  The Romance and the Reality, at the Wilton Public & Gregg Free Library, 7 Forest Road, Wilton, New Hampshire. Presented by Steve Taylor. Free to the public.

June 7, Thursday, 6:30pm, New England Lighthouses and the People Who Kept Them, at the Auburn Historical Society, 102 Hooksett Road, Auburn, New Hampshire. Presented by lighthouse author and expert Jeremy D’Entremont. Free to the public.

June 7, Thursday, 6:30pm, A Polish Odyssey, at the Chicopee Public Library, 449 Front Street, Chicopee, Massachusetts.  Hosted by the Polish Genealogical Society of Massachusetts.  Presented by genealogist Sara Campbell. 

June 7, Thursday, 7pm, Our Beloved Kin:  A New History of King Philip’s War, at the Cheshire County Court House, 33 Winter Street, Keene, New Hampshire. Present by author and Amherst College professor Dr. Lisa Brooks. Free to the public. 

June 7, Thursday, 7 - 8:30pm, Getting Started with Your Family Research:  A Four Week Course running June 7, 14, 21, and 28 at the Medford Public Library, 111 High Street, Medford, Massachusetts. Free to the public. Presented by Linda B. MacIver. Space is limited.  Attendance at first two classes is mandatory.  Pre-registration required at http://www.eventkeeper.com/code/ekform.cfm?curOrg=MEDFORD&curName=2018/06/07_Getting_Started_In_Your_Family_Research  

June 9, Saturday, 11am – 1:30pm, World War II Cruise of Boston Harbor, at the Charlestown Navy Yard Visitor Center, Boston, Massachusetts. Narrated cruise will cover the Navy Yard, The South Boston Annex, Army Base, Castle Island, Shipping Lanes, Long Island, Deer Island, the layout of underwater mines, Gallops Island, Georges Island and Peddocks Island.  Tickets at Eventbrite:  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/world-war-ii-cruise-of-boston-harbor-tickets-45770913033?aff=efbeventtix

June 9, Saturday, noon, Lunch and Learn:  Pilgrims Through the Religious Geography of England, from Henry 8th to James 1st, at Plimoth Plantation, 137 Warren Avenue, Plymouth, Massachusetts. $8 non-members. Bring a lunch or buy a lunch at the cafĂ©.  Presented by Rev. Dr. Arnold Klukas. http://www.plimoth.org/learn/programs-adults 

June 9, Saturday, 1 – 4pm, For Those Who Served:  Researching Veteran Ancestors in Colonial Conflicts, the American Revolution, and the War of 1812, at The American Independence Museum, Folsom Tavern, 164 Water Street, Exeter, New Hampshire.   Part 2 of a 4 part series sponsored by AIM, NEHGS, and a grant from the Treat Foundation. $20 members, $30 not-yet-members.  Part 3 on September 22, and part 4 on November 10. Presented by David Allen Lambert of NEHGS.  https://www.independencemuseum.org/workshops/ 

June 9, Saturday, 1:30pm, An Introduction to Polish Genealogy, at the Wayland Public Library, 5 Concord Road, Wayland, Massachusetts. Presented by Julie Roberts Szczepankiewicz, and sponsored by the Middlesex Chapter of the Massachusetts Society of Genealogists.  Free to the public.  http://msoginc.org 

June 9, Saturday, 7pm, Ergot: The Moldy Bread Myth and Salem, at the Witch House, 310 ½ Essex Street, Salem, Massachusetts.  Presented by Margo Burns, who will discuss how this myth has survived since the 1970s, a case study in how people come to believe and hold onto myths about historical events.

June 10, Sunday 1:30 - 3:30, What Really Happened at Ellis Island and Finding Waldo at Ellis Island, at Temple Emanuel in Newton, Massachusetts.  Sponsored by the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston (JGSGB), and presented by Joel Weintraub.  Free to members, $5 to the general public. 

June 10, Sunday, 4pm, Too Long in the Shadows, at the Fells Historic Estate, 456 Route 103 A, Newbury, New Hampshire.  A talk by Lynn Clark and Rebecca Courser on their research on rural, free black settlement in post-Revolutionary New Hampshire.  Also will be held June 1 at Warner, New Hampshire. Free to the public. 

June 10, Sunday, 1 – 2:30pm, A Pride Week Walk of Mount Auburn, at the Mount Auburn Cemetery, 580 Mt. Auburn Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts. A walking tour to visit the resting places of US Representative Gerry Studds, actress Charlotte Cushman, journalist Kate Field, and Asian art collector William Sturgis Bigelow, among others, in recognition of Boston Pride Week 2018.  For tickets click here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/a-pride-week-walk-of-mount-auburn-tickets-43139889571?aff=efbeventtix 

June 11, Monday, 7pm, The Capital Crime of Witchcraft: What the Primary Sources Tell Us, at the Camp Morgan Lodge, 339 Millen Pond Road, Washington, New Hampshire.  Presented by Margo Burns, this program focuses on the Salem witch trials of 1692 and 1693, but also examines a variety of other cases against women in New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Connecticut.  A potluck will be held at 6pm. Free to the public.

June 12, Tuesday, 7pm, On the Streets Where They Lived:  Exploring the Riches Hidden in Massachusetts Town Records, at the Worcester Public Library, 3 Salem Square, Worcester, Massachusetts.  Hosted by the Worcester Chapter of the Massachusetts Society of Genealogists.  Presented by Joy Hennig and Charlene Sokal. Free to the public, bring a friend. 

June 13, Wednesday, noon – 8pm, Feast of St. Anthony of Padua, at St. Leonard’s Parish, North End, Boston, Massachusetts. A low mass at noon, a high mass at 5pm, and a candlit procession at 6pm through the streets of the North End.

June 15, Friday, 6:30pm, New England Quilts and the Stories They Tell, at the Divine Mercy Church, 161 Wilton Road, Peterborough, New Hampshire.  Presented by Pam Week. Participants are invited to bring one quilt for identification or storytelling.  Sponsored by the Monadnock Quilter’s Guild.  Free to the public.

June 16 and 17, Living History Weekend: 1st Connecticut Provincial Regiment, at the Fort at No. 4, 267 Springfield Road, Charlestown, New Hampshire. Included with admission to the fort.

June 16 and 17, 6 am – 4pm, Colonial Re-enactment at Fort McClary, Kittery Point, Maine.  Hosted by the Pequawket Alliance. A French and Indian War military re-enactment, open to the public.

June 16, 23 and 30, 2pm – 4pm, Building Your Genealogical Skills (Three Session Course), at the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts. Presented by Ann Lawthers, Genealogist.  $75 for the full course, all three weeks.  Register here: http://my.americanancestors.org/single/eventDetail.aspx?p=537

June 17, Sunday, 1 – 2:30pm, Mount Auburn’s Civil Rights Legacy, at the Mount Auburn Cemetery, 580 Mt. Auburn Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts. In honor of Juneteenth, volunteer docent Stephen Pinkerton will lead a walking tour to the graves of civil rights litigants and jurists buried at Mount Auburn Cemetery.  Free to the public.

June 19 – 24, 2018 Annual Conference and Meeting for the Association of Gravestone Studies, at Danbury Connecticut.  Lectures, demonstrations, exhibits, conservation and documentation workshops, classroom sessions, slide presentations, and guided cemetery tours.  See the website for more information https://www.gravestonestudies.org/conference/register

June 20, Wednesday, 6:30pm, 100 Years Before Revolution: 17th Century Resistance in Massachusetts Bay, at the Old South Meeting House, 310 Washington Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Presented by historian Adrian Chastain Weimer.  Free to the public.  Registration requested at https://osmhjune20-18.brownpapertickets.com/ 

June 21, Thursday, 7pm, Poor Houses and Town Farms: The Hard Row for Paupers, at the Grange Hall, 7 Chase Hill Road, Andover, New Hampshire. Presented by Steve Taylor.  Free to the public.

June 23 and 24, Saturday and Sunday, Stark’s Muster at the Fort at No. 4, Charlestown, New Hampshire.  http://fortat4.org/calendar.php 

June 23, Saturday, 10am, New Visitor Tour of the New England Historic Genealogical Society Library, at 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Free orientation and tour of the NEHGS research facility.  Attendees are invited to stay and use the facility following the tour.  No registration necessary.

June 23, Saturday, 11am, Take a Tour Back in History: Visit Hartford’s Oldest Historic Site “Ancient Stones” at the Ancient Burial Ground, Gold and Main Street, Hartford, Connecticut.  Tours start at 11am. Free.  Call 860-337-1670.  Also Weekday Tours, Noon – 2pm in July and August, Free, contact abgatours@gmail.com or 860-690-9150. 

June 24, Sunday, 11am, Women’s History Walking Tour, at the Discover Portsmouth Center, 10 Middle Street, Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Tickets at http://portsmouthhistory.org/2018-walking-tours-of-historic-portsmouth-nh/   

June 25, Monday, 2:15pm, A Visit With Queen Victoria, at the Havenwood Auditorium, 33 Christian Avenue, Concord, New Hampshire. Presented by living historian Sally Mummey, who will perform in 19th century clothing resplendent with Royal Orders.  Free to the public.

June 26, Tuesday, 6:30pm, How Pilgrim Women’s Work Saved Plymouth Colony, at the Pilgrim Hall Museum, Plymouth, Massachusetts. Presented by early Americanists David Furlow and Lisa Pennington.  Free to the public.  Doors open at 6pm.

June 28, Thursday, noon, Lunch and Learn:  The Patriotic Shoe, at the American Independence Museum, Folsom Tavern, 1 Governor’s Lane, Exeter, New Hampshire.  Bring a lunch. Free to the public. Presented by Kimberly S. Alexander, from the Department of History at the University of New Hampshire.

Coming soon:

July 7, Saturday, History Camp Boston, at Suffolk University Law School, Boston, Massachusetts.  and History Camp Weekend http://historycamp.org/boston 

 July 14, Saturday, 10am – 4pm, 28th Annual American Independence Festival, hosted by the American Independence Museum, 1 Governor’s Lane, Exeter, New Hampshire. Battle re-enactments, colonial artisans, children’s activities, cannon firings, crafts, music, food and more.  Check out the website for more information:  https://www.independencemuseum.org/american-independence-festival/




August 19 and 19, Saturday and Sunday, Living History Event, at Historic Hillsborough, New Hampshire. http://livinghistoryeventnh.com/ This action packed weekend is held at four locations in the town of Hillsborough, New Hampshire.  2018 is the 10th anniversary! “George Washington” will be in attendance, along with battle re-enactors, musicians, sutlers, crafts, food, children’s activities and more. Tour the Franklin Pierce homestead, wagon rides, trolley tours, etc. Tickets available online through August 18th, and on location on the day of the event for cash only. Proceeds to benefit the Hillsborough Historical Society.


13 September, Thursday – Saturday, The 2018 New York State Family History Conference, at Tarrytown, New York.  More information coming soon.

 September 22, Saturday, 8am – 4pm – The Fall Conference of the American Canadian Genealogical Society, to be held at the ACGS, 4 Elm Street, Manchester, New Hampshire.  Annual meeting, raffles, three speakers – David Vermette, Pierre Gendreau Hetu, and Robert Perrault. 



September 29, Saturday, 9am – 1pm, Family Research Day – Mini Conference, at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 400 Essex Street, Lynnfield, Massachusetts.  12 different presentations in four tracks:  Beginning Research, Technology, DNA and Records. More information coming soon.



April 3-6, 2019,  New England Regional Genealogical Conference NERGC in Manchester, New Hampshire at the Radisson Hotel on Elm Street.  http://www.nergc.org/2019-conference/ for more information.

August 10 – 16, 2019, Founders, Fishermen and Family History Cruise, On Holland America’s ms Zaandam, departing Boston on August 10 for a 7 night trip to Canada, ports include Montreal, Quebec City, the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Charlottetown (Prince Edward Island), Sydney, Halifax, Bar Harbor, and Boston, Massachusetts. Speakers include the genealogists Gena Philibert-Ortega, Tami Osmer Mize, and David Allen Lambert. See the website for more information: http://www.oconnelltravel.com/rw/view/38994