Thursday, January 30, 2020

February 2020 Genealogy and Local History Calendar





For last minute updates, see the “Nutfield Genealogy” Facebook page at this link:  https://www.facebook.com/nutfield.gen/    Please send new events to me by commenting here at the end of this post, or email vrojomit@gmail.com

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February 1, 8:30 – 4pm, 4th Annual Revolution 250 Living History Symposium, at the Minute Man Visitor Center, Route 2A, on the Lincoln/Lexington, Massachusetts line. Presentations by blogger and author J.L Bell, Jonathan Lane of the Mass. Historical Society, and Professor Bob Allison of Suffolk University.  Limited capacity, please reserve a spot at this link:  https://www.facebook.com/events/696740734065887/  

February 1, Saturday, 9:30 – 3:30, 17th Century English Research with the Society of Genealogists, UK, at the American Ancestors Research Center, 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts. Presented by Else Churchill, $85 includes four lectures, breakfast and lunch.  Register here:  https://my.americanancestors.org/1224/1403  

February 1, Saturday, 9:30am, Life in World War II Belgium and Mother’s Flag, at the First Unitarian Church of Worcester, 90 Main Street, Worcester, Massachusetts. Hosted by the Massachusetts Society of Genealogists.  Presented by Christian W. de Marcken.  Free to the public.

February 1, Saturday, 10am, New Visitor Tour of the American Ancestors Research Center, at 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts. Free orientation and tour. No need to be a member, and no registration necessary. Tour attendees are welcome to stay and use the research center following the tour.

February 1, Saturday, 1pm, Sarah’s Long Walk for Equality in Education, at the Mattapan branch of the Boston Public Library, 1350 Blue Hill Avenue, Mattapan, Massachusetts.  Presented by a National Park Service Ranger.  A young girl of color, Sarah Roberts, forced Bostonians to acknowledge equality in education when her father sued the city of Boston in the 1800s.  Free to the public.

February 1, Saturday, 1pm, Northeast Woodlands Native American Youth Stories, at the Portsmouth Public Library, 175 Parrott Avenue, Portsmouth, New Hampshire.  A story telling performance with Anne Jennison. A drop-in event, free to the public. Family friendly! Q & A and children will be invited to drum. 

February 4, Tuesday, 3:30pm, A History of the New Hampshire Presidential Primary, at the Bedford Public Library, 3 Meetinghouse Road, Bedford, New Hampshire.  Free to the public. Led by John Gfoerer, documentarian, who will show segments of the documentary “The Premier Primary, New Hampshire and Presidential Elections.”

February 4, Tuesday, 5:15pm, Historical Datasets as Arguments, at the Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Presented by Tayla Housman, Digital Historian.  Free to the public.

February 4, Tuesday, 6:30pm, Indigenous Stories: People of the Dawnland, at the Portsmouth Public Library, 175 Parrott Avenue, Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Presented by Dr. Alexandra Martin of UNH, and Anne Jennison of Strawbery Banke museum. Free to the public.

February 4, Tuesday, 2pm to 7pm, Winter Doldrums Genealogy Mini-Camp, at the Maine State Library, State Street, Augusta, Maine. Library tours, help with research, and other fun activities. All ages welcome. Family friendly. https://www.maine.gov/msl/services/genealogy/index.shtml

February 4, Tuesday, 7pm, DNA and Genealogy: Where are we now in 2020? At the Chelmsford Public Library (McCarthy Room), Chelmsford, Massachusetts.  Presented by Dr. Sandy Murray, and hosted by the Chelmsford Genealogy Club.  Free to the public. 

February 4, Tuesday, 7pm, Sleighing in Northern New England, at the Exeter Historical Society, 47 Front Street, Exeter, New Hampshire. Presented by Ann Miles. Doors open at 6:30 for light refreshments. $5 suggested donation for non-members or $1 for students.

February 5, Wednesday, 6pm, Stolen: Five Free Boys Kidnapped Into Slavery, at the Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts. Author Richard Bell, University of Maryland, presents his new book.  Pre-talk reception at 5:30.  Please register at this link:  https://www.masshist.org/calendar/event?event=3130&fbclid=IwAR09LVa8oFp2Ah8_igm1i4-XEtnXmJaOJovvBZsObPLxPqVZeG1LJGS_S8E

February 5, Wednesday, 6pm, Western Massachusetts Genealogical Society Meeting, at the Agawam Senior Center, 954 Main Street, Agawam, Massachusetts.  https://westmassgen.com/

February 6, Thursday, noon, Stolen: Five Free Boys Kidnapped into Slavery, at the Boston Athenaeum, 10 ½ Beacon Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Author Richard Bell, University of Maryland, presents his new book.  Free to members, and included with admission $10 for non-members.  Please register at this link:  https://bbd.bostonathenaeum.org/register?fbclid=IwAR1SNRfbE7MVsTxAM2ukGcHOxAOpelqFcQk0ZPBd6a1eNIZb17KqVJjh74o

February 6, Thursday, noon, Lunch & Learn: Kitchen Medicine, at Plimoth Plantation, 137 Warren Avenue, Plymouth, Massachusetts. Learn about the medicinal plants used by the Pilgrims for health and wellness. Presented by the Living History Colonial Foodways Associate Kathleen Wall.  Tickets online at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/lunch-learn-kitchen-medicine-tickets-86565402449?aff=efbeventtix&fbclid=IwAR0l-3s5W8RKCwoT8AwxGZ__bMqYKqo10kZ2nFRmZWp_5834asrvm5WblU4 

February 6, Thursday, 5:30pm, A History of the New Hampshire Presidential Primary, at the Women’s Club of Concord, 44 Pleasant Street, Concord, New Hampshire.  Free to the public. Led by John Gfoerer, documentarian, who will show segments of the documentary “The Premier Primary, New Hampshire and Presidential Elections.”

February 7, Friday, 7pm, Film Premiere of Stephano:  The True Story of Shakespeare's Shipwreck, at the Pilgrim Hall Museum, 75 Court Street, Plymouth, Massachusetts.  This film will air later on PBS as part of the "Hit and Run History" series.  The film follows the life of Stephen Hopkins.  Meet film maker Andrew Buckley for Q & A and light refreshments after the screening.  $10 per person, $5 for members.  Reservations recommended at https://pilgrimhall.org  

February 8, Saturday, 10am, Behind the Scenes In the Collections Storage: Conservation Lab, at the Haverhill Regional Office of Historic New England, Haverhill, Massachusetts.  $20 for members, $30 for non-members.  Advance tickets required call 671-994-6678. 

February 8, Saturday, 10:30am, DNA Painter and Chromosome Mapping, at the Acton Memorial Library, 486 Main Street, Acton, Massachusetts.  Hosted by the Massachusetts Society of Genealogists. Free to the public. Presented by genealogist Pamela Guye Holland.

February 8, Saturday, 2pm, Lecture: Canal Fever in New Hampshire and Vermont, at the New Hampshire Historical Society, 30 Park Street, Concord, New Hampshire. An illustrated talk by transportation historian Frank J. “Jay” Barrett, Jr. Free to members, $7 for non-members.

February 9, Sunday, 1:30pm, Avraham Groll – What’s New at Jewish Gen? at the Temple Emanuel, 385 Ward Street, Newton Centre, Massachusetts. Hosted by the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston.  Find out the new technology and features to help your research.  www.jgsgb.org 

February 9, Sunday, 2pm, Lecture: Skeletons in the Closet: Memorialization of George Jacobs, Sr. and Rebecca Nurse after the 1692 Witch Trials, at the Felton Smith Historic Site in the Smith Barn, 38 Felton Street, Peabody, Massachusetts. Hosted by the Peabody Historical Society and Museum. Presented by historian Daniel Gagnon. Members free, non-members $5. Handicapped accessible.

February 10, Monday, 6pm, Civil War Monuments and the Militarization of America, at the Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Presented by Thomas J. Brown, University of South Carolina.  Pre-talk reception at 5:30.  $10 per person, tickets at https://www.masshist.org/calendar/event?event=3131&fbclid=IwAR2vatZsrSB8_fkxoC30fd4vuJScoFLbrGFsOjEC7FhV7ydtTrqko3A_HVo

February 10, Monday, 6:30pm, The Story of Amjambo Africa, with Georges Budagu Makoko, at the Lithgow Public Library, 45 Winthrop Street, Augusta, Maine.  Hosted by the Camden Conference.  Learn more at the website www.camdenconference.org Snowdate will be Tuesday, February 11th.

February 10, Monday, 6:30pm, The History of the Presidency, at the Langley Adams Library, 185 Main Street, Groveland, Massachusetts.  Free to the public. Presented by historian Lee Thomas.

February 11, Tuesday, 5:30 pm, A History of the New Hampshire Presidential Primary, at the Women’s Club of Concord, 44 Pleasant Street, Concord, New Hampshire.  Presented by John Gfroerer. Free to the public.

February 11, Tuesday, 6pm, Boston by Map, at the Norman B. Leventhal Map and Education Center at the Boston Public Library, 700 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  This event offers an introduction into the history of Boston using maps. In this class you will explore how to used Atlascope, a new took for exploring atlases of Boston.  This workshop is located in the instructional computer lab on the mezzanine level of the Johnson building at the library in Copley Square. Registration required:  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/boston-by-map-tickets-88538560217?fbclid=IwAR3O-Lde_23OzCpv82Lf5efDkVF35z6XFTQQUt4XoxhG9Kv513NpC8mvmU8

February 11, Tuesday, 6pm, Marcia Chatelain with Franchise: The Golden Arches in Black America, part of the American Inspiration Author Series at the the American Ancestors Research Center, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Author Marcia Chatelain will present her new book.  $12/50 admission, or $34 admission and signed book. 

February 12, Wednesday, 10am,  New Visitor Tour of the American Ancestors Research Center, at 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts. Free orientation and tour. No need to be a member, and no registration necessary. Tour attendees are welcome to stay and use the research center following the tour.

February 12, Wednesday, 6pm, City On A Hill, at the Boston Athenaeum, 10 ½ Beacons Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  A book talk by author Alex Krieger.  $15 for visitors, $10 for BA members.  Register here:  https://www.bostonathenaeum.org/events/6903/city-hill-urban-idealism-america-puritans-present?fbclid=IwAR0qxSO9LbOdW8Ythge_R64TSv-Hp_6NPyVCPru2GmHMzEMImtG8tihenk4

February 12, Wednesday, 6:30pm, Introduction to Exeter’s Black History, at the Exeter Historical Society, 47 Front Street, Exeter, New Hampshire. A discussion on Jude Hall, a former slave and Revolutionary War veteran. Free to the public.

February 13, Thursday, 6pm, Pilgrims’ Progress Lecture-Concert, at the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts. Hosted by Seven Times Salt and NEHGS. Tickets $20 at https://my.americanancestors.org/1223/1439?fbclid=IwAR21pOa1eM1iQcoZBf0nf3-zTgMcaAIMJmvgeq2JbtFM7zK08HSbuhFqM3I 

February 14, Friday, 1:30pm, Researching Women’s Lives, at the Genealogy Club of the Rodgers Memorial Library, Hudson, New Hampshire. Presented by genealogist Sara Campbell, Free to the public.

February 15 and 16, Saturday and Sunday, Mid-Winter Weekend at the Fort at No. 4, 267 Springfield Road, Charlestown, New Hampshire. There will be bonfires for warms, winter drills, food demonstrations, and traders.  Low season event – members and children under 12 FREE, 13 – 18 years old $5, adults $8.  The Fort at No. 4 will be partnering with the American Precision Museum of Windsor, Vermont. 

February 15, Saturday, 10am, The Colonial Wedding Expo: A History Space Event, at the Colony House, Washington Square, Newport, Rhode Island. Free to the public, donations welcome.  Activities include, talking to a bride dressing for a colonial wedding, recipes and foods commonly served in the colonial period, see a ceremony portrayed by living historians, discuss wedding traditions for different religious groups represented in 18th century Newport, and much more!

February 15, Saturday, 1pm, Redcoats and Rebels: Gaming the American Revolution, at the New Hampshire Historical Society, 30 Park Street, Concord, New Hampshire. Reenact the American Revolution through a tabletop gaming experience.  Kids will spend the afternoon immersed in New Hampshire’s fight for independence from Britain.  This program is for kids ages 10 to 15. Space is limited and registration is required.  $5 per child.  All must be accompanied by an adult.  Register online at Eventbrite.com or call 603-856-0645

February 15, Saturday, 2pm, The History of Greenhouses in America, at the Lyman Estate Greenhouses, Waltham, Massachusetts.  $10 members, $20 non-members. Advance tickets required, call 617-994-5913. 

February 15, Saturday, 7pm, The Jane Austen Ball, at the Old Town Hall, 32 Derby Square, Salem, Massachusetts.  Hosted by the Commonwealth Vintage Dancers.  All dances will be taught, no experience or partner required.  Regency era dress is admired, but not required. Live music! Tickets at this link: https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07egi1al3f87ee6ee4&oseq=&c=&ch=

February 16, Sunday, 2pm, I Now Pronounce You Lucy Stone, by History at Play, at the Keeler Tavern Museum & History Center, 152 Main Street, Ridgefield, Connecticut.  Presented by Judith Kalaora.  Family friendly, suitable for all ages.

February 16, Sunday, 2pm, Family History on Your Smartphone, iPad or Tablet, Portsmouth Public Library, Hilton Garden Room, Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Presented by genealogist Pam Guye Holland. Hosted by the library and the Ranger Chapter of the DAR. Free to the public.

February 16, Sunday, 2pm, Votes for Women: A History of the Suffrage Movement, at Rodgers Memorial Library, 194 Derry Road, Hudson, New Hampshire.  Presented by Liz Tantarelli using historic photos and documents. Free to the public.

February 17, Monday, 11am, Newport’s British Occupation Walking Tour, at the Newport Historical Society, 82 Touro Street, Newport, Rhode Island.  $15 per person, $10 members, Tour departs from the Museum of Newport History & Shop, 127 Thames Street, Newport, Rhode Island.

February 18, Tuesday, 5:15pm, "What the Women Can Do" Doctor's Wives and the American Medical Association's Crusade Against Socialized Medicine, at the Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Presented by Kelly O'Donnell, Thomas Jefferson University with comment by Oliva Weissner, University of Massachusetts Boston.  Free to the public, registration required: https://www.masshist.org/calendar/event?event=3105

February 18, Tuesday, 5:30pm, Sketches of Lee Volume 2: A Black New Hampshire Experience, at the Wiggin Public Library, 10 Bunker Hill Avenue, Stratham, New Hampshire. A book discussion on “The Colored Folks Ain’t Gonna Make It”.  This is the story of rural New Hampshire from the 1950s until the present time. Books will be available to purchase at the event. Snow date is Tuesday February 25 at 5:30pm.

February 19, Wednesday, noon, Using AmericanAncestors.org: A Hands-On Workshop, at the American Ancestors Research Center, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Presented by Molly Rogers, the NEHGS Database Coordinator.  Free to the public.  Attendees are encouraged to bring a laptop or other mobile device for guided hands-on activities and walkthroughs of the website. Register here:  https://my.americanancestors.org/1223/1445

February 19, Wednesday, 1pm, Abby Hutchinson’s Sweet Freedom Songs: Songs and Stories of the Struggle for Abolition and Woman Suffrage, at the Warner Town Hall, 5 East Main Street, Warner, New Hampshire. Hosted by the Pillsbury Free Library. Free to the public. Presented by Deborah Anne Goss who will appear as Abby Hutchinson Patton.

February 19, Wednesday, 2:15pm, History at Play Presents: Rendezvous with Rachel Revere, at the Marillac Residence, 125 Oakland Street, Wellesley, Massachusetts.  Family friendly. 50 minutes including performance and lecture.

February 19, Wednesday, 6pm, Mother is a Verb: An Unconventional History, at the Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Presented by Sarah Knott, Indiana University.  Pre-talk reception at 5:30. $10 per person ticket required:  https://www.masshist.org/calendar/event?event=3127

February 24, Monday, 12:45pm, A Visit with Abraham Lincoln, at the Suncook Senior Center, 8 Whitten Street, Allenstown, New Hampshire. Portrayed by living historian Steve Wood, who will end with a reading of the Gettysburg Address. Free to the public with a grant from the New Hampshire Humanities Council. Hosted by the Suncook Senior Center.

February 25, Tuesday, 7pm, The History of the Pierce Mansion in Gardner, Massachusetts, at the February Meeting of the Central Massachusetts Genealogy Society, American Legion Post 129, 22 Elm Street, Gardner, Massachusetts.  Presented by Ken Watson, who will describe the history of the 6,661 square foot Victorian home.  Free to the public. 

February 26 – 29, RootsTech Conference, Salt Lake City, Utah

February 26, Wednesday, noon, The Atlas of Boston History, at the Boston Athenaeum, 10 ½ Beacon Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Presented by author Nancy Seasholes.  Free with admission ($10), members free. 

February 26, Wednesday, 2pm, Kristen Richardson with The Season: A Social History of the Debutante, part of the American Inspiration Author Series at the American Ancestors Research Center, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  $12.50 admission or $32 Admission and signed book.  Register here:  https://my.americanancestors.org/1137/1428

February 27, Thursday, 10am, Behind the Scenes In the Collections Storage, at the Haverhill Regional Office of Historic New England, Haverhill, Massachusetts.  $20 for members, $30 for non-members.  Advance tickets required call 671-994-6678. 


February 27, Thursday, 7pm, A Rosenberg By Any Other Name:  A History of Jewish Name Changing in America, at the Vilna Shul, Boston’s Center for Jewish Culture, 18 Phillips Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Sponsored by NEHGS.  Cost $15, register here:  https://vilnashul.org/events/event/rosenberg

February 27, Thursday, 6pm, We the People: The 500 Year Battle Over Who Is American, at the Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts. Presented by Ben Railton of Fitchburg State University.  Pre-talk reception at 5:30.  Tickets required at $10 per person  https://www.masshist.org/calendar/event?event=3133&fbclid=IwAR3n_D-du_iKqwYJmL4fl_Ba17XL-RgLy_k-MKnGRs4vzK5FIzaBwEhbdZ8

February 29, Saturday, 2pm, Abby Hutchinson’s Sweet Freedom Songs: Songs and Stories of the Struggle for Abolition and Woman Suffrage, at the New Hampshire Historical Society, 30 Park Street, Concord, New Hampshire. Presented by living historian Deborah Anne Goss as Abby Hutchinson Patton. Free to the public.

February 29, Saturday, 2pm, New Hampshire on Skis, at the Bath Public Library, 21 Lisbon Road, Bath, New Hampshire. Presented by Professor E. John B. Allen.  Free to the public.

Future Events:

March 14, Saturday, History Camp Boston, at Suffolk University Law School.  https://historycamp.org/boston

 March 21 and 22, 9:30 am – 4:30pm, Old House and Barn Expo, at the Double Tree Hotel, 700 Elm Street, Manchester, New Hampshire.  Have fun and learn from the experts. New topics include resiliency and sustainability. Resources for properties from 1700 to 1970.  Explore preservation strategies, architecture, crafts, hourly historical lectures, visit exhibitors, and demonstrations. 



March 21, Saturday, 1 to 4pm, Workshop: Using Land Records in Family History Research, at the New Hampshire Historical Society, 30 Park Street, Concord, New Hampshire.  Hosted by the NH Historical Society and New England Historic Genealogical Society, presented by the chief genealogist David Allen Lambert.  Space is limited and registration is required. $35 for members and $50 for non-members.  Please sign up through eventbrite or call Christopher Moore at the NH Historical Society 603-228-6688.  Email cmoore@nhhistory.org 

March 25, April 8, April 22, May 6, May 20, June 3, Researching Your Family Tree: A Course for Beginners, at the Kimball Library, 5 Academy Avenue, Atkinson, New Hampshire. To meet every other Wednesday from 1 – 3pm.  $30 for Atkinson residents, $55 for non-residents. Call 603-362-5234 to register. Presented by genealogist and librarian Linda MacIver.

 April 4-5, The 2020 Massachusetts Genealogical Council Seminar:  Origins and Destinations, at the UMass Lowell Inn & Conference Center, Lowell, Massachusetts.  

May 1 – 4, Salem Ancestry Days, at Salem, Massachusetts. Do you have ancestors from Salem, Massachusetts? This will be a weekend of lectures, tours and research. More information will be posted soon at https://www.salem.org/ancestryweek/

 May 21, Thursday, noon – 5pm, Welcome Home, Mayflower II, at Pilgrim Memorial State Park, Plymouth, Massachusetts.  Come celebrate the return of the newly restored Mayflower II to her home berth in Plymouth harbor.  The celebrations will continue all Memorial Day weekend.

June 27 and 28, Saturday and Sunday, 10am – 9pm, Official Maritime Salute to the 400th Anniversary, at the Plymouth Waterfront, Water Street, Plymouth, Massachusetts. A regatta of wooden ships, yachts, work boats and pleasure craft, with a traditional lobster dinner on the waterfront. Military fanfares, and maritime programming. Your boat can be part of the Parade of Lights! Hosted by Plymouth 400 https://www.plymouth400inc.org/

August 1, Saturday, 10am – 2pm, Wampanoag Ancestors Walk, at the Plymouth Waterfront, Water Street, Plymouth, Massachusetts.  This event will be led by the Wampanoag tribes of Massachusetts.  Participants will pay homage to the original 69 villages of the Wampanoag nation, Massasoit and King Phillip.  Drum ceremony and reception. Hosted by Plymouth 400 https://www.plymouth400inc.org/


September 14, Monday, 11am – 4pm, The Official State House Salute to the 400th Anniversary, at the Massachusetts State House, 24 Beacon Street, Boston, Massachusetts.

September 19 and 20, Saturday and Sunday, Embarkation Festival at Plymouth, Massachusetts. This is a grand cultural and arts festival honoring the traditions, cuisine, and music of the settlers and Wampanoag people, as well as the diverse population of immigrants who have become the fabric of American life.  Performing groups, chefs, artists, storytellers, and student projects from around the world celebrating the 400th anniversary of Plymouth, Massachusetts. Hosted by Plymouth 400 https://www.plymouth400inc.org/ 

October 29 – November 1, Indigenous History Conference and Powwow, at Bridgewater State University, 131 Summer Street, Bridgewater, Massachusetts. This four day conference will address the legacy of colonization experienced by the Wampanoag and other native people in New England. Hosted by Plymouth 400.  https://www.plymouth400inc.org/

April 14, 2021 – April 17, 2021, NERGC 2021 (The New England Regional Genealogical Conference), at the Mass Mutual Center, 1277 Main Street, Springfield, Massachusetts. http://nergc.org/ 



Tuesday, January 28, 2020

Christa McAuliffe - Tombstone Tuesday

This tombstone was photographed at Calvary Cemetery in Concord, New Hampshire.  Today is the 34th anniversary of the Challenger shuttle disaster on 28 January 1986.

While we were visiting this cemetery to photograph this tombstone, a bald eagle flew up from the Merrimack River and flew over the cemetery and landed in the trees behind the gravestones.  I thought it was very appropriate for the moments after we were thinking about Christa McAuliffe and the other Challenger astronauts.




S. CHRISTA McAULIFFE
SEPTEMBER 2, 1948 - JANUARY 28, 1986

WIFE  MOTHER  TEACHER
PIONEER WOMAN
CREW MEMBER, SPACE SHUTTLE CHALLENGER
AMERICA'S FIRST ORDINARY CITIZEN TO VENTURE
TOWARD SPACE

SHE HELPED PEOPLE. SHE LAUGHED.  SHE LOVED AND IS LOVED.  SHE APPRECIATED THE WORLD'S
NATURAL BEAUTY. SHE WAS CURIOUS AND SOUGHT TO LEARN WHO WE ARE AND WHAT 
THE UNIVERSE IS ABOUT.  SHE RELIED ON HER OWN JUDGEMENT AND MORAL COURAGE
 TO DO RIGHT.  SHE CARED ABOUT THE SUFFERING OF HER FELLOW MAN.  SHE TRIED
TO PROTECT OUR SPACESHIP EARTH.  SHE TAUGHT HER CHILDREN TO DO THE SAME.


Click here for a 2010 blog post about my memories of this day in 1986:

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Christa McAuliffe - Tombstone Tuesday", Nutfield Genealogy, posted January 28, 2020, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2020/01/christa-mcauliffe-tombstone-tuesday.html: accessed [access date]).

Thursday, January 23, 2020

A Google Book Search for Mayflower Books

Mayflower II 1957 arriving in Plymouth harbor
There are many, many books on the Mayflower and the Plymouth Colony, and many are listed on Google Books, but few are readable online.  Some are just previews, or are searchable, but not readable.  You won't find the latest research or the newly published books on the Pilgrims here, those books are still under copyright - like Jeremy Dupertuis Bangs' book Strangers and Pilgrims, Travellers and Sojourners or Nathaniel Philbrick's Mayflower.

Many of the older books contain out of date research, but some are invaluable such as the membership directories from the Mayflower Society from 100 years ago, or the epitaphs from Plymouth's Burial Hill written in 1896 (some of those epitaphs are now illegible).  The most recent book on this list was published in 2009, but most are 100 years older than that!  If you are interested in a particular book on this list, just type the title and author into the search bar at https://books.google.com/   Also, please note that these digitized versions of the books are searchable, so you search each volume for surnames, geographic locations, or any other keyword.  Sometimes this is better than having the actual volume in front of you on the desk! 


The Arrival of the Pilgrims, by John Franklin Jameson, 1920, published by Brown University.

Bradford’s History “Of Plimoth Plantation”, 1901, published by Wright & Potter, state printers for the Massachusetts General Court. 

The Brewster Genealogy, 1566 – 1907: A Record of the Descendants of William Brewster of the Mayflower, Ruling Elder of the Pilgrim Church which founded Plymouth Colony in 1620, Volume 1,  by Emma C. Brewster Jones, 1908.

Captain Myles Standish, by Tudor Jenks, 1905, published by Century Company.

Chief of the Pilgrims: Or the Life and Time of William Brewster, Ruling Elder of the Pilgrim Company that Founded New Plymouth, the Parent Colony of New England, in 1620, by Ashbel Steele, 1857, published by J. B. Lippincott.

Chronicles of the Pilgrim Fathers of the Colony of Plymouth, by Alexander Young, 1841, published by C. C. Little and J. Brown.

The Colony of New Plymouth and Its Relations to Massachusetts: A Lecture of a Course by Members of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Delivered before the Lowell Institute, Jan. 19, 1869, by William Brigham, 1869. 

Elder William Brewster, of the Mayflower: His Books and Autographs, with Other Notes, by Justin Winsor, 1887, published by John Wilson and Son.

Epitaphs from Burial Hill, Plymouth, Massachusetts from 1657 to 1892 with Biographical and Historical Notes, by Bradford Kingman, 1892, Brookline, Mass.: New England Illustrated Historical Publishing Company.

The Enterprise of the Mayflower, by Amice MacDonell, 1889, published by Walter H. Baker & Company.

The General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1901, published by the General Society of Mayflower Descendants.

Good Newes from New England, by Edward Winslow, 1996, published by Applewood Books.  
Governor William Bradford’s Letter Book, by William Bradford, 1906, published by the Massachusetts Society of Mayflower Descendants (reprinted from the Mayflower Descendant).

The Graves of Myles Standish and Other Pilgrims, by Eugene Joseph Vincent Huiginn, 1914.
Guide to Plymouth and Recollections of the Pilgrims, Volume 2, by William Shaw Russell, 1846.

Handbook of Old Burial Hill, Plymouth, Massachusetts: Its History, Its Famous Dead, and Its Quaint Epitaphs, by Frank Herman Perkins, 1896.

An Historical Memoir of the Colony of New Plymouth, by Francis Baylies, 1830, published by Hilliard, Gray, Little and Wilkins.

A History of the Allerton Family in the United States, 1585 to 1885, and a Genealogy of the Descendants of Isaac Allerton, Mayflower Pilgrim, Plymouth, Mass., 1620, by Walter Scott Allerton and Horace True Currier, 1900, published by S. W. Allerton.

History of Plimoth Plantation, by William Bradford, 1898, Boston: Wright and Potter Printing Co.

History of Plymouth County with Biographical Sketches of Many of Its Pioneers and Prominent Men, Massachusetts, by Duane Hamilton Hurd, 1884, Philadelphia: J. W. Lewis & Co.

History of Plymouth Plantation, by William Bradford, edited with notes by Charles Deane, 1856, Boston: Privately Printed.

The History of the Pilgrims, Or, A Grandfather’s Story of the First Settler of New England, 1831, Boston: T. B. Marvis for the Massachusetts Sabbath School Union.

History of the Town of Plymouth, by William Thomas Davis, 1885, Philadelphia: J. W. Lewis & Co.

History of the Town of Plymouth, from Its First Settlement in 1620 to the Present Time: With a 
Concise History of the Aborigines of New England, and Their Wars with the English, etc., by James Thacher, 1835, published by Marsh, Capen & Lyon.

The Howland Homestead, 1911, published by the Society of the Descendants of Pilgrim John Howland, of the Ship Mayflower.

An Illustrated Guide to Historic Plymouth, Massachusetts, by Walter F. Wheeler, 1921, Boston: The Union News Company.

John Robinson, Pastor of the Pilgrim Fathers, A Study of his Life and Times, by Walter Herbert Burgess, 1920, published by Williams & Norgate.

The Last of the Mayflower, by James Rendel Harris, 1920, published by the University Press.

Lives of the Governors of New Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay, by Jacob Bailey Moore, 1848, New York: Gates & Stedman.

The Mayflower, edited by Robert Hamilton, 1846, originally published in Boston by Saxton & Kelt.

Mayflower Essays on the Story of the Pilgrim Fathers as Told in Governor Bradford’s History of the Plimoth Plantation:  With a Reproduction of Captain John Smith’s Map of New England, by George Cuthbert Blaxland, 1896, published by Ward & Downey.

The Mayflower: Or, Scenes and Sketches Among the Descendants of the Pilgrim Fathers, by Harriet Beecher Stowe, 1852, published by Knight and Son.

The Mayflower Pilgrims: Being a Condensation in the Original Wording and Spelling of the Story Written by Gov. William Bradford of their Privations and Trials, and the Voyage of the Mayflower and Settlement at Plymouth in the Year 1620, by William Bradford and John Tyler Wheelwright, 1921, published by McGrath-Sherrill Press.

The Mayflower Descendant: A Quarterly Magazine of Pilgrim Genealogy and History, Volume 23 (1921) and others published by the Massachusetts Society of Mayflower Descendants.

Mayflower Descendants and Their Marriages for Two Generations After Landing, 1922, published by the Bureau of Military and Civic Achievement, Washington, DC

The Mayflower Pilgrim Descendants in Cape May County, New Jersey, by Paul Sturtevant Howe, 1921, published by A. R. Hand.

Mourt’s Relation: A Journal of the Pilgrims at Plymouth, 1986, published by Applewood Books.

Mourt’s Relation Or Journal of the Plantation at Plymouth, contributors Edward Winslow, Henry Martyn Dexter, and William Bradford, 1865, published by J. K. Wiggin.


The New England’s Memorial, by Nathaniel Morton, 2009, published by Applewood Books.

The Pastor of the Pilgrims: A Biography of John Robinson, by Walter Herbert Burgess, 1920, published by Harcourt, Brace & Howe.

Pilgrim Alden: The Story of the Life of the First John Alden in America, by Augustus Ephraim Alden, 1902, Boston: James H. Earle & Company.

Pilgrims and Puritans: The Story of the Planting of Plymouth and Boston, by Nina Moore Tiffany, 1888, published by Ginn & Company.

The Pilgrims and Their Monument, by Edmund Janes Carpenter, 1911, published by D. Appleton and Company.

Records of the Colony of New Plymouth, In New England, Volume 7, by Nathaniel Shurtleff and David Pulsifer, 1861, Boston: the press of William White. 

Records of the Town of Plymouth, Massachusetts, Volume 1 1636 to 1705, 1889, Plymouth: Avery & Doten.

Richard Warren of the Mayflower and Some of His Descendants, by Emily Warren Roebling, 1901, published by David Clapp & Son.

The Romantic Story of the Mayflower Pilgrims: And Its Place in the Life of Today, by Albert Christopher Addison, 1911, published by L. C. Page.

Signers of the Mayflower Compact, by Annie Arnoux Haxtun, 1896.

The Signers of the Mayflower Compact and Their Descendants, by Henry Whittemore, 1899, published by the Mayflower Publishing Company.

Society of Mayflower Descendants in the State of Michigan, 1915.

Stories of the Pilgrims, by Margaret Blanche Pumphrey, 1912, published by Rand McNally.

A Tribute to the Memory of the Pilgrims, and a Vindication of the Congregational Churches of New England, by Joel Hawes, 1836, published by D. Burgess & Company.

The Voyage of the Mayflower, by Blanche McManus, 1897, published by E. R. Herrick & Company.

The Women of the Mayflower and Women of Plymouth Colony, by Ethel Jane Russell Chesebrough Noyes, 1921, published by Memorial Press. 

The Women who Came on the Mayflower, by Annie Russell Marble, 1920, published by the Pilgrim Press.


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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "A Google Book Search for Mayflower Books", Nutfield Genealogy, posted January 23, 2020, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2020/01/a-google-book-search-for-mayflower-books.html: accessed [access date]).

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Mary Adams, Infant, died 1818, Derry, New Hampshire ~ Tombstone Tuesday

This tombstone was photographed at the Forest Hill Cemetery in Derry, New Hampshire. At the time of this burial, this was Londonderry, New Hampshire.


Sacred
to the memory of
MARY ADAMS
daughter of Mr. Samuel &
Mrs. Sarah Adams
who died Nov. 9, 1818
aged 1 yr. & 14 days.

While cleaving to this darling dust,
And weeping at her grave
We would adore the wise and just
Who takes but what He gave.

Mary Adams, born abut 25 October 1817 and died 9 November 1818, was the infant daughter of Samuel Adams and Sarah Fitz, who were married on 3 March 1817 in Londonderry, New Hampshire.  They had three daughters: first, Mary Woodman (above), second Caroline Sawyer born 25 August 1819 and married Albert S. Newsmith, and third Louisa, born 17 February 1822 and married the Rev. Charles S. Porter.  They also had a son named George Fitz, born in Derry on 29 June 1824 and married Elizabeth W. Whitney.

Colonel Samuel Adams was born in Newbury, Massachusetts on 20 April 1779 and died 12 September 1861 aged 82 years.  He was a son of the Elder David Adams and Mary Woodman.  Colonel Samuel Adams was a descendant of Robert Adams (1602 - 1682) of Newbury.

Sarah Fitz, his wife, died 26 April 1878, aged 84 years.  Sarah was the daughter of Currier Fitz and Sarah George of Hampstead, Sandown and Derry, New Hampshire.  Her brother Daniel graduated from Dartmouth College and the Andover Theological Seminary and was a pastor at Ipswich, Massachusetts from 1826 to 1867.

To see an online version of The Descendants of Robert Adams of Newbury, Mass, by Andrew N. Adams, 1900,  (see page 126 for Colonel Samuel Adams) click this link:
http://freepages.rootsweb.com/~ankeny/folklore/Robert%20of%20Newbury/Robert%20Capture.pdf 


UPDATE -  January 22, 2020  A has reader figured out the missing words in the epitaph above "adore the wise" by googling the words of the poetry and matching it to this Barnstable, Massachusetts epitaph on Find A Grave:  https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/130618406/joseph-smith 

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Mary Adams, Infant, died 1818, Derry, New Hampshire ~ Tombstone Tuesday", Nutfield Genealogy, posted January 21, 2020, (https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2019/12/mary-adams-infant-died-1818-derry-new.html: accessed [access date]).

Thursday, January 16, 2020

A Google Book Search for Nutfield Books

Names of people (ancestors, relatives, their neighbors and friends mentioned in letters and documents) can show up in all sorts of places online. Google Book search is nice place to start from the comfort of your own home http://books.google.com/  When starting out with a family or new branch of the family tree, it is a good idea to just explore the local history where you know your ancestor lived. Once you click on a book found at Google Books, you are able to search for keywords in every volume, one at a time or through all the books in the database. If Google Books doesn’t satisfy, try Internet Archive or the Hathi Trust websites.   For the book best selection, check your local library and see what is available through the inter-library loan system.

Here are a few of the books found about Nutfield (Londonderry, Derry, Windham, Derryfield (Manchester)), New Hampshire at Google Book Search:

Bibliography of Manchester, NH, by Sylvester Clark Gould and John Weeks Moore, 1885, originally published by Harvard University.

Manchester Historic Association Collections, Volume 4, by the Manchester Historic Association, 1908. [also volumes 1; 3, 1903; 1897; 7, 1914;  11, 1909; and more]

Contributions to the History of Derryfield, New Hampshire, William Ellery Moore, 1896, originally published by Harvard University.

Derry Revisited, by Richard Holmes and William Dugan, 2005, Acadia Publishing
  
The Descendants of James and William Adams of Londonderry, Now Derry, NH: Also a Brief Account of the Families of Robert Cochran and Joseph Morrison of Londonderry, and of Dea. Thomas Cochran of New Boston, NH, by Andrew N. Adams, 1894, Rutland, VT, Tuttle Company. (Also available is the Higginson Genealogical Books reprint)

Early Records of Londonderry, Windham and Derry, NH 1719-1745, by George Waldo Browne, 1911, Manchester Historic Association.

Early Records of the Town of Derryfield, 1751 – 1782, George Waldo Browne, 1905.

Early Records of the Town of Derryfield, 1782 – 1800, George Waldo Browne, 1907, Manchester, NH.

Historic Tales of Windham, by Derek Saffie, 2016, Arcadia Publishing.

The History of Londonderry, Comprising the Towns of Derry and Londonderry, NH , by Edward Lutwych Parker, 1851, Boston: Perkins and Whipple.
  
James Rodgers of Londonderry and James Rogers of Dunbarton, by Josiah H. Drummond. 1897, Manchester, NH, Gould Publishers

Londonderry, by the Londonderry Historical Society, 2004, Arcadia Publishing. (some pages not viewable)

The Londonderry Celebration: Exercises on the 150th Anniversary of the Settlement of Old Nutfield , by Robert C Mack, 1870, Manchester: Published by John B. Clarke.

Manchester: A Brief Record of Its Past and Picture of Its Present, Including an Account of Its Settlement and of Its Growth as a Town and City; A History of Its Schools, Churches, Societies, Banks,  compiled by Maurice D. Clarke, 1875, published by J. B. Clarke.

Manchester Men: Soldiers and Sailors in the Civil War, 1861 – 66, by George Clinton Gilmore, 1898, originally published by Harvard University.

The Manchester, New Hampshire Directory, 1901, Sampson & Murdock Company.

Poems of Robert Dinsmoor, “The Rustic Bard”, by Robert Dinsmoor and James Dinsmoor, 1898, Damrell & Upham.

Scotch Irish in New England, by Arthur Latham Perry, 1891, J.S. Cushing & Company (originally the University of California).

Scotch Irish Pioneers in Ulster and America, by Charles Knowles Bolton, 1910, published by Bacon and Brown (originally the University of California).

Semi-centennial of the City of Manchester, New Hampshire September 5, 7, 8, 9, 1896, by Herbert Walter Eastman, 1897.

A Sermon, Delivered at Londonderry East Parish, May 5, 1816, Occasioned by the Death of John Pinkerton, Esq., by Edward Lutwyche Parker, 1816.

The Siege and History of Londonderry, 1861 [about Londonderry in Northern Ireland before the 1718 migration]

Supplement to the History of Windham in New Hampshire: A Scotch Settlement, by Leonard Allison Morrison, 1892, Boston, Mass: Damrell & Upham

The Road to Derry:  A Brief History, by Richard Holmes, 2009, Arcadia Publishing.

Township, Nutfield, Harrytown, Derryfield, and Manchester, From the Earliest Settlements to the Present Time, by George Franklyn Willey, 1896, Manchester, NH: Willey Publishers
  
Willey’s Book of Nutfield: A History of that Part of New Hampshire Comprised Within the Limits of the Old Township of Londonderry, from Its Settlement in 1719 to the Present Time, by George Franklyn Willey, 1895.

Willey’s Semi-Centennial Book of Manchester, 1846-1896: Historic Sketches of that Part of New Hampshire Comprised Within the Limits of the Old Tyng Township, Nutfield, Harrytown, Derryfield, and Manchester, From the Earliest Settlements to the Present Time, by George Franklyn Willey, 1896, Manchester, NH: Willey Publishers



-----------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "A Google Book Search for Nutfield Books", Nutfield Genealogy, posted January 16, 2020, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2020/01/a-google-book-search-for-nutfield-books.html: accessed [access date]).

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Ann Morrison, died 1825, East Derry, New Hampshire ~ Tombstone Tuesday

This tombstone was photographed at the Forest Hill Cemetery in East Derry, New Hampshire.


In memory of
MRS. ANN,
wife of 
John Morrison, Esq.
who died,
Feb. 27, 1825,
AEt. 68
SUSANNA F.
Died March 28, 1811
AEt. 28
JAMES
died Dec. 25, 1820,
AEt. 32
Son & Dau. of
John Morrison, Esq,
& Mrs. Ann, his wife. 


Ann Grey, born 24 August 1751 and died 27 February 1825, was the wife of John Morrison. They were married in Newburyport, Massachusetts on 19 April 1778.  He was born 28 February 1749 and died 21 April 1840.  They had three children, John, born 2 October 1779 (married Jennette Paul), Susanna, and James.  

I'm not sure which Morrison family John Morrison belongs to.  Does anyone know his parents?

This is a link to a blog post about the first few Morrison families in Nutfield (now Derry, Londonderry, and Windham, New Hampshire).  Perhaps John Morrison (above) fits into one of these families?   https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2019/03/morrison-descendants-of-nutfield.html  

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Ann Morrison, died 1825, East Derry, New Hampshire ~ Tombstone Tuesday", Nutfield Genealogy, posted January 14, 2020, (https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2020/01/ann-morrison-died-1825-east-derry-new.html: accessed [access date]).  

Thursday, January 9, 2020

Researching Ancestors Who Were Religious Leaders

Rev. Ingraham Ebenezer Bill
My 3rd great grandfather


I've found quite a few ministers in my family tree.  Are there clergy, rabbis, or any other religious leaders in your family?

When tracing the protestant ministers in my family, I came to the conclusion that in early colonial New England the ministers' children married mostly the children of other ministers.  This pattern was quite common in the 1600s and 1700s, but I can see it also in the 1800s.  Perhaps it was a social class distinction.  Ministers were well educated, but often very poor, so their children tended to marry teachers and other ministers instead of lawyers and other businessmen?  Perhaps it was due to the fact that they led a strict upbringing?  This is just my theory. What do you think?

Most religious leaders had some sort of formal education, but not all.  Take advantage of this education to find where they attended schools, colleges and universities.  Some of the Puritan ministers who came over with John Winthrop's fleet in the 1630s went to Cambridge and Oxford Universities in England, and that is a great place to look for personal family information.  Harvard was founded as a place to instruct these ministers in the New World.  You can contact the colleges, universities, and religious institutions in the areas where your family lived to find out if they attended, and what records might be available.  Even if the school is no longer in existence, the records were often moved to another school's archives or library.

Sometimes someone in your family tree will just "see the light" or have a calling to the ministry.  This is what happened to my ancestor Ingraham Ebenezer Bill, who was the son of Asahel Bill, a Connecticut farmer who relocated to Nova Scotia during the planter movement in the 1760s.  Ingraham Ebenezer Bill was the youngest of eleven children, born in 1805 in "Billtown", Nova Scotia.  During his youth he experienced a religious conversion to the Baptist faith.  He was uneducated beyond grade school, yet went on to be one of the founders of the Baptist school Acadia College in 1831, and was later granted an honorary Doctorate of Theology.

Once I found Rev. Bill's connection to Acadia College (now Acadia University), I contacted their archive and received a large envelope with copies and newsclippings of his activities, photographs, sermons, and travels through Canada, all the eastern USA, and England.  The college also had a copy of his personal journal, and a biography written by one of his sons!  You can be sure that I wrote a nice donation to the Acadia library in lieu of regular copy charges.  You can read about the Bill family at this link:  https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2013/03/surname-satruday-bill-of-boston.html 

Finding a religious figure in your family tree can open up lots of information.  Just Google all the variations of your ancestor's name and see all the results.  Try "Rev. John * Smith"  or "Reverend *Smith" or "Rev. Smith DD", etc.   Each denomination and religion has it's own variations. Google can bring up sermons, weddings, funerals, newspaper articles, and obituaries this way.

Make a time line to see where your religious leader may have lived.  Some led one congregation for their entire life, and others moved from town to town, state to state, or even from country to country.  Timelines can be invaluable for genealogy research.

If your family was Roman Catholic, often there were siblings (great aunts and uncles) who entered religious service as nuns, priests, and or monks.  These family members didn't leave descendants (unless they were widows or widowers, and even rarer, divorced), and often changed their names, making them difficult to trace  (census records will use their religious name, not their birth name).  However, there are patterns in some families about which religious orders they preferred, which can help you to find the convent or monastery, and often the catholic schools other family members attended.  Once you find the religious order this relative entered, you can write to the order, or visit your own parish priest for help.  Once you find the religious order, you will find they kept very good records on their members, including birth place, parents names, burials, and more.

For the truly curious:

Is a Rabbi Hiding in Your Family Tree?  Lessons from Genetic Genealogy for Traditional Genealogists   https://www.academia.edu/18659950/Is_a_Rabbi_Hiding_in_Your_Family_Tree_Lessons_from_Genetic_Genealogy_for_Traditional_Genealogists 

Rabbinical Genealogy: Sources at the Center for Jewish History
https://www.cjh.org/pdfs/Rabbis.pdf 

Finding Family in Religous Service, by Juliana Smith
http://blogs.ancestry.com/circle/?p=3243 

Researching Irish Catholic Priests, Nuns and Religious Brothers, by Kyle J. Betit
https://www.irishrootsmedia.com/img/products/Sample%20issue%20108_1.pdf 

Colonial American Ministers Project at geni.com
https://www.geni.com/projects/Colonial-American-Ministers/13900 

The Colonial Clergy and the Colonial Churches of New England, by Frederick Lewis Weiss, reprinted by the Genealogical Publishing Company of Baltimore, Maryland, 1936  (there are similar books by Weiss for Maryland, Delaware, Georgia, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina).  Some of these are available online - check Google books.

Society of the Descendants of the Colonial Clergy
http://colonialclergyorg.blogspot.com/  

The Society of the Descendants of the Colonial Clergy has sponsored a book Pedigrees of the Descendants of the Colonial Clergy, by Robert Glenn Thurtle, 1976 available online at the Hathi Trust website:  https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/005802358

A handy list of the New England Puritan ministers and their approximate time of arrival from England (1630 - 1641):  http://sites.rootsweb.com/~genepool/preacher.htm 


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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Researching Ancestors Who Were Religious Leaders", Nutfield Genealogy, posted January 9, 2020, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2020/01/researching-ancestors-who-were.html: accessed [access date]).

Tuesday, January 7, 2020

The "Baby Garden" at the Davis Cate Cemetery, Hooksett, NH - Tombstone Tuesday

These tombstones were photographed at the Davis-Cate Cemetery in Hooksett, New Hampshire. This small cemetery is on Hackett Hill Road near our house. I have driven by hundreds of times, but finally I decided to walk the cemetery to read the names and take pictures. I'm glad I did because I found many distant cousins here.



DAVIS-CATE
CEMETERY
Presented by
John A. Cate
1953

Like many New England cemeteries, there is a "Baby Garden" in this burial ground.  It is to the far left of the entrance gate, next to the stone wall.  Small children were buried here, and there are only three tombstones, although I suspect that there were many more burials.  The little gravestone of Craigh Otterson is especially poignant with the headless lamb carved on top.  Little lambs were often carved on the top of tombstones for young children and infants.


JEREMY JAY                 CRAIGH ALAN
BARNES                    OTTERSON
JULY 5 1978                 DEC. 16, 1946
JULY 30 1978                 APR. 7, 1955
                                          - A GOOD BOY-



RICHARD A. COTE JR.
"RICHIE"
MAY 30, 1988 - JULY 6, 1993
FOREVER YOUNG

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "The "Baby Garden" at the Davis Cate Cemetery, Hooksett, NH - Tombstone Tuesday", Nutfield Genealogy, posted January 7, 2020, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2020/01/the-baby-garden-at-davis-cate-cemetery.html: accessed [access date]).

Friday, January 3, 2020

Happy Birthday, Dad!


John "Jack" Warren Wilkinson
3 January 1934 - 7 August 2002
Photo taken at his home at 7 Dearborn Avenue, Beverly, Massachusetts

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Happy Birthday, Dad!", Nutfield Genealogy, posted 3 January 2020, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2020/01/happy-birthday-dad.html: accessed [access date]).