Monday, July 31, 2017

August 2017 Genealogy and Local History Calendar




For last minute updates, see the "Nutfield Genealogy" Facebook page at this link:  https://www.facebook.com/nutfield.gen/ 


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August 1, Tuesday, Twilight Talks: Secure the Shadow: Victorian Spirt and Post-Mortem Photography, at the Otis House, 141 Cambridge Street, Boston,  Massachusetts.  $12 for non members, $10 members of Historic New England.

August 2, Wednesday, 7pm, Digging into Native History in New Hampshire, at the Moultonborough Public Library, 4 Holland Street, Moultonborough, New Hampshire.  Presented by Robert Goodby.  Free to the public, sponsored by the NH Humanities Council.  603-476-8895.

August 2 and 23, Wednesdays, 10am, Ancestry.com Classes, at the Wolfeboro, New Hampshire public library, taught by Alan Francis.  Free to the public. Call Dee Ide at 603-630-8497 with any questions. 

August 3, Thursday, noon, Lunch and Learn: Ecological Pilgrims:  How New England’s Ecology has been Shaped by Colonists.  At Plimoth Plantation, Plymouth, Massachusetts.  Present by Caitlin Fisher-Reid.  Bring a bag lunch!  Free to members, $8 for not yet members. Click here for tickets: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/lunch-learn-ecological-pilgrims-how-new-englands-ecology-has-been-shaped-by-colonists-speaker-tickets-32687511226

August 4, Friday, noon – 1pm, Using AmericanAncestors.org, at the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Presented by Claire Vail and Don LeClair.  Free. Register here: https://shop.americanancestors.org/products/using-americanancestors-org?pass-through=true  

August 4, Friday, 9am - 6pm, FREE Friday at the Old State House, 206 Washington Street, Boston, Massachusetts. Discover why the Revolution began here.  Activities for the whole family.  Sponsored by the Highland Street Foundation. http://www.bostonhistory.org/events/2017/8/4/free-fun-friday  

August 4 - 5, Friday - Saturday,  Archaeology, Barrel Making and More at the Alden House Reunion, Duxbury, Massachusetts.  The 117th annual reunion of the Alden Kindred of America, Inc. Friday night party 7 – 9pm, Saturday presentation at 2pm with a talk by UMass graduate student Caroline Gardiner who has been researching artifacts from the Alden site. Cooper Ron Raiselis will demonstrate barrel making from noon to 4pm.  Alden House open for tours from noon to 4pm.  www.alden.org  

August 5, Saturday, 10am, New Visitor Tour of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, at NEGHS, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts. Free orientation and tour.  You do not need to be a member. Free.  No registration necessary.  Tour attendees are welcome to use the library following the tour.

August 5, Saturday, 10am – noon, Fashions of Their Times, 1805 – 1925: A Historical Fashion Workshop, at the Nickels Sortwell House, 121 Main Street, Wiscasset, Maine.  $25 non-members, $15 members of Historic New England.   Registration is limited, please call 207-882-7169 for more information. 

August 5, Saturday, 1pm, Vanished Veterans – New Hampshire’s Civil War Monuments and Memorials, at the Kingston Town Hall, 163 Main Street, Kingston, New Hampshire.  This event is part of “Kingston Days” and Kingston will be celebrating its 323rd anniversary this weekend. Presented by George Morrison who has located, inventoried and photographed the Civil War monuments of NH from the 1860s to the 1920s.  Free to the public, hosted by the Kingston Historical Museum.  603-702-2021.

August 5, Saturday, 1pm, Burial Hill Tours: History in Progress: Plymouth and the Great War (tour begins at the top of Burial Hill, Plymouth, Massachusetts).  2017 marks the 100th anniversary of the entry of the USA into World War I.  This is a guided walking tour of the cemetery by Dr. Anne Reilly, Executive Director of the Plymouth Antiquarian Society.  For more information email pasm@verizon.net or call 508-746-0012 

August 5-6, Redcoats and Rebels, at The Old Sturbridge Village, Sturbridge, Massachusetts.  New England’s largest military re-enactment with nearly 1,000 soldiers portraying British, Irish, Spanish, Scottish, French and Colonial troops.  Mock battles, skirmishes, tour the camps, listen to martial music, and much more. 

August 7, Monday, 3pm, New Hampshire’s One-Room Rural Schools: The Romance and the Reality, at the Meredith Bay Colony Club, 21 Upper Mile Point Drive, Meredith, New Hampshire. Presented by Steve Taylor, sponsored by the New Hampshire Humanities Council.  Free to the public.

August 8, Tuesday, 10am, Family Stories: How and Why to Remember and Tell Them, at the Belmont Senior Center in Belmont Mill, 14 Mill Street, Belmont, New Hampshire.  Presented by storyteller Jo Radner.  Participants will practice finding, developing, and telling their own tales.

August 10, Thursday, 7:15pm,  New Hampshire Cemeteries and Gravestones, at the Old Meeting House, 1 New Boston Road, Francestown, New Hampshire.  Business meeting at 7p, with program to follow at 7:15.  Presented by Glenn Knoblock.  FREE to the public.

August 11, Friday, 11am, Walk with Washington, at the Langdon House, 143 Pleasant Street, Portsmouth, New Hampshire.  A guided walking tour through Portsmouth in the footsteps of George Washington.  $8 Historic New England members, $12 non-members.  Registration required at 603-436-3205.

August 11, Friday, FREE Friday at the Worcester Historical Museum, 30 Elm Street, Worcester, Massachusetts. Activities for the whole family.  http://www.worcesterhistory.org/programs/free-fun-fridays/  

August 12, Saturday, 10 am - noon, Walking Tour of St. Augustine Cemetery in Manchester, New Hampshire, South Beech Street, next to the Hebrew Cemetery.  Sponsored by the Manchester Historic Association.  $5 members, $10 general public.  Pre registration required 603-622-7531.  This tour will be led by local historians Dick Duckoff and Matt Labbe.  Learn about local Franco American pioneers, Mayor Moise Verrett, Lt. William Jutras, Edmond Pinard, and Tancred Pariseau, among others. 

August 12, Saturday, noon – 4pm, Herbs for Hearth and Home, at the Alden House Historic Site, Duxbury, Massachusetts. www.alden.org  Historian Leslie Evans will present an on-going demonstration on the uses for both common and lesser known herbs.  The Alden House will also be open for tours.

August 12, Saturday, 9am – 4pm, Fiber Revival and Vintage Base-Ball Double Header at the Spencer-Peirce-Little Farm, 5 Little’s Lane, Newbury, Massachusetts.   Lowell Base Ball Club vs. Newburyport Clamdiggers starting at noon.  Hand dying, hand-spinning, weaving, metalwork, alpaca and sheep husbandry, rug making, kitting, as well as washing, combing, and spinning demonstrations. Vendors, workshops, and more. $6 non-members, $4 Members of Historic New England.  For more information 978-462-2634.

August 13, Sunday, 2:15pm, New Hampshire Cemeteries and Gravestones, at the Newbury Town Office Building, 937 Route 103, Newbury, New Hampshire.  Presented by Glenn Knoblock, FREE to the public. Hosted by the Newbury Historical Society.  603-763-4746.  The Historical Society business meeting will take place at 2pm with the program to follow at 2:15 pm.

August 15, Tuesday, 6:30pm, New England Lighthouses and the People who Kept Them, at the Fuller Public Library, 29 School Street, Hillsboro, New Hampshire.  Presented by lighthouse historian Jeremy D’Entremont.  Sponsored by the NH Humanities Council.  Free to the public. 603-464-3595.

August 15, Tuesday, 6pm,  Twilight Talks: From Lockup to Luxury Hotel:  The Rise, Fall, and Redemption of the Charles Street Jail, at the Otis House, Boston, 141 Cambridge Street, Massachusetts.   5:30 reception.  $12 non-members, $10 members of Historic New England or the Victorian Society.  Registration recommended at 617-994-5920.  

August 15, Tuesday, 7pm, Robert Rogers of the Rangers: Tragic Hero, at Alumni Hall, 75 Court Street, Haverhill, New Hampshire. Presented by George Morrison.  Hosted by the Haverhill Historical Society.  Free to the public.  603-787-2446.

August 15, Tuesday, 7pm,  A Soldier’s Mother Tells Her Story, at the New Castle Historical Society, 120 Main Street, New Castle, New Hampshire.  Presented by living historian Sharon Wood who will portray Betsey Phelps, the mother of a Union soldier from Amherst, New Hampshire who died heroically at the Battle of Gettysburg.  Free to the public.  603-436-4132.

August 16, Wednesday, noon, Lunch and Learn:  Collecting John Paul Jones: America’s First Action Hero,  at the American Independence Museum,  Folsom Tavern, 164 Water Street, Exeter, New Hampshire . Free to the public.  Presented by historian J. Dennis Robinson, made possible by a grant from the New Hampshire Humanities Council.  Bring a lunch to enjoy during the lecture.

August 16 and 30, Wednesdays, 10am, Fundamentals of FamilySearch.org, at the Wolfeboro, New Hampshire public library.  Taught by Dee Idle.  Bring a laptop please.  Free to the public.  Call Dee Ide at 603-630-8497 with any questions. 

August 17 – 19, World Quilt Show New England, at the Radisson Center of New Hampshire, Manchester, New Hampshire.  Learn from instructors from all around the world, lectures on quilt history and preservation, and shop for quilt supplies and fabric.  215-862-5828.

August 17, Thursday, 6pm, Genealogy Workshop:  Got Your DNA Test Results Back? Now What?, at the Portsmouth Public Library, 175 Parrott Avenue, Portsmouth, New Hampshire.  Presented by Jennifer Shoer.  Free to the public.
August 18, Friday, Free Fun Friday at Sturbridge Village Museum, Sturbridge, Massachusetts. Activities for the whole family, sponsored by the Highland Street Foundation.  https://www.osv.org/event/free-fun-friday 

August 18, Friday, FREE Fun Friday at the Freedom Trail Foundation, Boston, Massachusetts.  Sponsored by the Highland Street Foundation.   https://www.thefreedomtrail.org/plan-trip/FreeFunFridays.shtml  On this day the Freedom Trail Foundation will offer walking tours at no coast all day long.  Also, the Foundation will set up a table by the Brewer Fountain on the Boston Common and give away 60 tickets for tours. 

August 19, Saturday, 10am - 4pm, The Green Corn Festival, at Plimoth Plantation, Plymouth, Massachusetts. The Native Wampanoag celebrate the corn harvest with singing, dancing, games and other traditional festivities.  Free with Museum admission. http://www.plimoth.org/calendar?trumbaEmbed=view%3Devent%26eventid%3D124488322&mc_cid=4aa8d3bade&mc_eid=8cf6024ba3   

August 19, Saturday, 9am – 4:30pm, Preservation Roadshow:  Save Your Family’s Files and Photos for Future Generations, at the DCU center, 50 Foster Street, Worcester, Massachusetts.  $65 per person.  Register online https://shop.americanancestors.org/products/preservation-roadshow-keep-for-your-family-s-memories-for-generations-to-come

August 19, Saturday, 2pm, The Shaker Legacy, at the Lane Memorial Library, 2 Academy Avenue, Hampton, New Hampshire.  Presented by Darryl Thompson who will explore the contributions, legacies, and personal memories of the Shakers at Canterbury, New Hampshire. Sponsored by the NH Humanities Council.  Free to the public.  603-926-3368.

August 21, Monday, 7pm,  New England’s Colonial Meetinghouses and their Impact on American Society, Campton Historical Society, Campton, New Hampshire. Free to the public.  Presented by Paul Wainwright.  Sponsored by the New Hampshire Humanities Council.  Contact information 603-536-3982.

August 23, Wednesday, 7pm, Brewing in New Hampshire: An Informal History of Beer in the Granite State from Colonial Times to the Present, at the Alvirne Hills House,  Hudson Historical Society, 211 Derry Road, Hudson, New Hampshire.  Presented by Glenn Knoblock, and sponsored by the New Hampshire Humanities Council.  Free to the public.

August 25, Friday, FREE Fun Friday at the Museum of African American History,  46 Joy Street, Boston, Massachusetts. http://maah.org/

August 25, Friday, FREE Fun Friday at the USS Constitution Museum, Charlestown Navy Yard,  Building 22, Charlestown, Massachusetts.  Hands on activities for the whole family, next door to the USS Constitution (Old Ironsides). https://ussconstitutionmuseum.org/

 August 25, Friday, FREE Fun Friday at Plimoth Plantation, 137 Warren Avenue, Plymouth, Massachusetts.  Fun activities all day long for the entire family. See the Pilgrim village, Wampanoag homestead, the Grist Mill and more! www.plimoth.org

August 26, Saturday, 10am, New Visitor Tour of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, at NEGHS, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts. Free orientation and tour.  You do not need to be a member. Free.  No registration necessary.  Tour attendees are welcome to use the library following the tour.

August 26, Saturday, 10am - 4pm, Lineage Society Summit, at the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 99 - 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Meet with representatives from a number of national and local hereditary societies to learn more about the application process and requirements.  A FREE, drop-in activity open to the public with a brief presentation at 11am and repeated at 2pm.  Register today! https://shop.americanancestors.org/products/lineage-society-summit 

August 26, Saturday, 10am, Faces and Families:  Folk Art Portraits at Cogswell’s Grant, 60 Spring Street, Essex, Massachusetts. $5 Historic New England members, $15 nonmembers.  Registration required at 978-768-3632.

August 29, Tuesday,5pm,  A Walk Back in Time:  The Secrets of Cellar Holes, at the Chapin Senior Center, 37 Pleasant Street, New London, New Hampshire.  Presented by Adair Mulligan and sponsored by the New Hampshire Humanities Council.  Free to the public.  Contact information 503-526-6368.

September 2, Saturday, 1pm,  Burial Hill Tours:  History in Progress:  Gravestone Conservation (tour begins at the top of Burial Hill in Plymouth, Massachusetts).  A close look at individual stones to reveal changing techniques and highlights the philosophy of modern day historic preservation.  Led by Dr. Donna Curtin, Executive Director of Pilgrim Hall Museum, and Dr. Anne Reilly, Executive Director of the Plymouth Antiquarian Society.  For more information email pasm@verizon.net or call 508-736-0012 

September 2, 3, and 4, Militia Weekend at Old Sturbridge Village, Sturbridge, Massachusetts.  This weekend will feature all the sights and sounds of the training days that 1830s companies took part in at least twice a year.  You will experience everything from cannon and musket demonstrations, to martial music and sham battles. Included with museum admission.  www.osv.org  

Looking ahead:



September 16, Saturday, 2017 Annual Maine State Genealogical Society Fall Conference, at the Point Lookout Resort, 67 Atlantic Highway, Northport, Maine. www.maineroots.org

September 23 and 24, Saturday and Sunday, 11am – 3pm, Thirteenth Annual Portsmouth Fairy House Tour, starting at the Langdon House,  143 Pleasant Street, Portsmouth, New Hampshire and continuing throughout the historic South End neighborhood including Strawbery Banke and Prescott Park.  Please call 603-436-3205 for more information.  Advance tickets recommended. http://www.portsmouthfairyhousetour.com/  and on Facebook.

 September 30, Saturday, American Canadian Genealogy Society Fall Conference, Manchester, New Hampshire.  Annual meeting, three speakers (Jeanne Douillard, Lucie LeBlanc Consentino, and Leslie Choquette), buffet luncheon, raffle.

October 14, Saturday, 1 – 3pm,  French Canadian Genealogy Society Fall General Membership Meeting.  Coffee, a brief business meeting, followed by guest speaker Lucie LeBlanc Consentino.  Open to non-members.

 December 16, The 243rd Anniversary Boston Tea Party Reenactment, at the Old South Meeting House, 310 Washington Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Witness the debate over the tea tax, then join the procession to Griffin’s Wharf and witness the destruction of the tea by the Sons of Liberty.  Fee for the meeting inside the Meeting house. 

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "August 2017 Genealogy and Local History Calendar", Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 31, 2017, (https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/07/august-2017-genealogy-and-local-history.html: accessed [access date]).

Saturday, July 29, 2017

Surname Saturday ~ ALLERTON , a Mayflower Passenger


ALLERTON

My 11th great grandfather, Isaac Allerton (1586 – 1659) arrived in New England on board the Mayflower in 1620 with his pregnant wife and three children.  His origins are unknown.  There was another passenger on board named John Allerton, but their kinship is unknown.  Isaac’s sister Sarah was married to fellow Mayflower passenger Digory Priest (they were married on the same day as Isaac and his wife, Mary Norris).   He was the fifth man to sign the Mayflower compact, listed after Carver, Bradford, Winslow and Brewster.  Only Brewster and Allerton used the prefix “Mr.”

Upon arriving in Cape Cod bay, many of the Mayflower passengers fell ill, and half died that first winter including John Allerton, and Isaac’s wife, Mary, and their new infant child born on board the ship.  Isaac was left a widower with three young children who survived the winter.  He remarried to Fear Brewster, daughter of Elder William Brewster, in 1623.

Isaac Allerton acted as a business agent in the colony’s dealing with the Plymouth Company in England.  He was named assistant governor to Bradford until 1624.  He returned to England in 1626 to obtain supplies for the colony and to renegotiate their agreements with the investors on paying off their debt. He returned again to England in 1628 for a grant for a trading post in Kennebeck, Maine.  He made  a third voyage in 1630, and he was dismissed as the agent for the colony for mishandling their funds.

In 1632 the trading post on the Kennebec River was destroyed by the French.  He set up another trading post at what is now Machias, and he began fishing out of Marblehead.  He is considered one of the founders of Marblehead, where he lived briefly.   He was persuaded to leave Marblehead for his religious views.  The post at Machias was destroyed by the French in 1634.  He removed from Massachusetts to New Haven, Connecticut, where he lived until his death in 1659.

Isaac Allerton is an ancestor to Presidents Zachary Taylor and Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

Remember Allerton, my 10th great grandmother, was only about five years old when she was a passenger on the Mayflower in 1620. She lost an infant sibling and her mother before they settled in Plymouth, Massachusetts.  Her father and two other siblings survived.  She married Moses Maverick, and had six children. She died sometime between the baptism of her child in 1652 and 1656 when her husband remarried to Eunice, the widow of Thomas Roberts.   I descend from her third child, Abigail Maverick (1645 – 1686), my 9th great grandmother.

Some ALLERTON resources:

(There are many, many resources available on Mayflower passengers, but these two books are the best in my opinion)

The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620 - 1633, by Robert Charles Anderson, 1995, Volume 1, pages 35 – 39 for a sketch on Isaac Allerton and his children.

Mayflower Families Through Five Generations, Volume Seventeen: Isaac Allerton [one of the Silver books series], 1998, pages 1 – 3 for Isaac Allerton, pages 4 – 6 for Moses Maverick and Remember Allerton, and pages 9 – 10 for Abigail Maverick and Samuel Ward.  Martha Ward and John Tuttle are outlined on pages 26 – 27, and Martha Tuttle and Mark Haskell are on pages 65 – 66.

My ALLERTON genealogy:

Generation 1:  Isaac Allerton, born about 1586 in England, died between 1 and 15 February 1659, New Haven, Connecticut; married on 4 November 1611 in Leyden, Holland to Mary Norris, daughter of Edward Norris and Elizabeth, his wife.  She was born 1587 in Newbury, Berkshire, England, and died 25 February 1621 on board the Mayflower, off the coast of Cape Cod, New England. They had four children.

Generation 2:  Remember Allerton, born about 1614 in Leyden, Holland, died before 22 October 1656; married before 6 May 1635 in Marblehead, Massachusetts to Moses Maverick, son of John Maverick and Mary Gye.  He was baptized 3 November 1611 in Huish, Devonshire, England.  Six children.

Generation 3:  Abigail Maverick m. Samuel Ward
Generation 4:  Martha Ward m. John Tuthill
Generation 5:  Martha Tuthill m. Mark Haskell
Generation 6:   Lucy Haskell m. Jabez Treadwell
Generation 7:   Nathaniel Treadwell m. Mary Hovey
Generation 8:   Jabez Treadwell m. Betsey Jillings Homan
Generation 9:   Eliza Ann Treadwell m. Abijah Hitchings
Generation 10:  Abijah Franklin Hitchings m. Hannah Eliza Lewis
Generation 11:  Arthur Treadwell Hitchings m. Florence Etta Hoogerzeil
Generation 12:  Gertrude Matilda Hitchings m. Stanley Elmer Allen (my grandparents)


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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, “Surname Saturday ~ ALLERTON , a Mayflower Passenger”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 29, 2017, (https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/07/surname-saturday-allerton-mayflower.html: accessed [access date]). 

Friday, July 28, 2017

Happy 8th Blogoversary to me!


On 27 July 2009 I wrote my first blog post, not expecting that I would still be blogging in 2017!   I remember that I wrote that post days before this date (maybe even weeks before?) but I was working up the nerve to “publish”.  Finally, I pushed the button.  When I came back three days later to post the next story, I was amazed to see that several people were reading my blog. And it grew from there!

Over the past years I have grown as a writer.  And I’ve also made hundreds of new friends in the genealogy and genealogy blogging world. And I’ve grown as a researcher and genealogist. And I’ve not only “met” people virtually online but I’ve been all over the world from Hawaii to Nova Scotia to Spain on trips to meet cousins, to speak at conferences, and to research more stories. Who knew all that would happen just by writing my little stories on the web?

I can confidently say that blogging my genealogy and local history stories has helped my research in hundreds of ways.  When I started, I had been researching for over 30 years, and I thought it was time to stop researching and to take all those notes and turn them into stories. This was true, and writing up all the notes into stories and sketches has been a terrific experience.  But, I was wrong when I thought that it meant that I could stop researching.  Fine tuning my previous research, and writing up sketches, has meant even more research as I double check my old notes, search for new research, and discuss these New England ancestors with other genealogists and distant cousins via the blog, social media, and in person.

Some genealogists work in their “genea-caves” visiting archives alone, and researching online late at night all alone in their pajamas.  That used to be me, too.  Since I started blogging I’ve learned to reach out, double check my sources, crowd source my stories, and visit libraries and repositories with a buddy (or even with a crowd!).  Not all bloggers have had this experience or change in their lives, but I’m glad it happened to me.  Even if I someday stop blogging (don’t worry! I’m not even thinking about that!) I will always cherish the new friends, colleagues, cousin connections, and professionals I have met and befriended on this journey.

Some statistics collected over the past 8 years (as of today):

2497 blog posts
2,152,172  pageviews
5049 comments  (less comments in the last two years. I don't know why)
278  Surname Saturday posts
357  Tombstone Tuesday posts
304  Weathervane Wednesday posts

Best month ever:  April 2015 - over 75,000 pageviews

Most popular blog post ever:
"A Favorite Christmas Gift!  You Might Want One, Too!"  218,610 views

A link to my first blog post:

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, “Happy 8th Blogoversary to me!”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 27, 2009, (https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/07/happy-8th-blogoversary-to-me.html: accessed [access date]).

Vintage Views of Boston ~ Photo Friday

These photos were taken by my grandfather from the top of the Prudential Center building in Boston, Massachusetts in the 1960s.   The tower was opened in 1964, so it must have been quite a tourist attraction.  The skywalk or observation deck is on the 50th floor and there is a restaurant above it.  It was the tallest building in Boston until the John Hancock Tower (now known as 200 Clarendon Street) opened in 1976.


This view looks north across the Charles River to MIT and Cambridge. I loved looking at this view because the MIT campus has changed so much, especially the west campus, which appears mostly green here.  Vincent's dorm, New House, isn't here at all, nor most of the other big dorms along Memorial Drive.  Back Bay is mostly unchanged except for a few buildings here and there. 


This view looks across the Charles River Basin to Lechmere and the Science Museum.  Most of Lechmere and Kenmore Square are quite developed now, with high rise buildings.  This side of the river (Back Bay and Beacon Hill) look very similar except for the tall buildings that exist now downtown on the other side of Beacon Hill.


I wasn't sure about this view, so I posted it on Facebook.  My Hawaiian ohana cousin Taryn Holt though it might be Castle Square Park, so I looked it up online. According to the South End Historical Society website, "In the mid-1960s, buildings near Herald, Paul, Albion, Village, Emerald, and Middlesex streets were razed. The Castle Square housing complex was then built on the site."  [see this link: http://www.southendhistoricalsociety.org/why-is-castle-square-called-castle-square/ ]  By looking at this area on Google maps with the satellite view, Taryn was correct.  You can verify this by siting the Cyclorama, which is visible near the bottom right corner of the razed area. Urban renewal was rampant in 1960s Boston, here in the South End and in the West End. 

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Vintage Views of Boston ~ Photo Friday", Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 28, 2017, (https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/07/vintage-views-of-boston-photo-friday.html: accessed [access date]).

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Weathervane Wednesday ~ An Angelic Weathervane

Weathervane Wednesday is an on-going series of photographs I post weekly.  I started out by publishing only weather vanes from the Londonderry area, but now I've been finding interesting weather vanes from all over New England.  Sometimes these weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are very unique.  Often, my readers tip me off to some very special and unusual weather vanes.

Today's weather vane was photographed  and contributed by a reader from somewhere in New Hampshire.

Do you know the location of weather vane #309?  Scroll down to see the answer...






This weathervane of the angel Gabriel was photographed by New Hampshire blogger Scott Powell at the Zulauf Chapel at the Lake View Cemetery in Wolfeboro, New Hampshire.  According to the website, this chapel was recently renovated, and the cupola was rebuilt.  It looks like they added a shiny new weathervane at the same time, because this copper weathervane looks too bright to have been an original.

I have seen similar angels like this on private residences, but I like that this weathervane was located in a cemetery.  I have often seen the angel Gabriel on New England gravestones.  This artistic version of Gabriel with the trumpet is a Christian symbol of the resurrection. Gabriel is also a popular symbol in Jewish and Islamic art and literature.

Pine Grove Cemetery,
Manchester, New Hampshire

Lakeview Cemetery website - http://www.lakeviewcemeterynh.org/chapel.html

Scott Powell's blog "Lake Wicwas Nature Journal" - http://wicwaslake.blogspot.com/   


Click here to see the entire Weathervane Wednesday series of posts!  

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Scott Powell and Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~ An Angelic Weathervane", Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 26, 2017, (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/07/weathervane-wednesday-angelic.html: accessed [access date]).

Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Captain John Carter, buried 1692 in Woburn, Massachusetts

This tombstone was photographed at the Old Burial Ground (First Burial Ground) in Woburn, Massachusetts



MEMENTO                               FUGIT
MORI                                         HORA

HERE LYES Ye BODY OF
CAP. JOHN CARTER
AGED ABOUT 76
YEARS, DECEASED Ye
14 OF SEPTEMBER 1692

Captain John Carter, my 8th great grandfather, was the son of Thomas Carter (1585 – 1652) and his wife, Mary (died 1665), of Charlestown, Massachusetts.   John Carter was born about 1617 in England and died 14 September 1692 in Woburn, Massachusetts.  He married first to Elizabeth Kendall, my 8th great grandmother, in 1642 in Woburn.  She had five children, and died on 6 May 1691 in Woburn.  John Carter married a second time, to Elizabeth Groce, in 1692.

My CARTER lineage:

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, “Tombstone Tuesday ~ Captain John Carter, buried 1692 in Woburn, Massachusetts”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 25, 2017, (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/07/tombstone-tuesday-captain-john-carter.html: accessed [access date]). 

Monday, July 24, 2017

Our Family ChartMasters Heirloom Family Tree

Our Family Tree, by Family Chartmasters
Quite a few years ago, in 2011, I met Janet Hvorka of the Family Chartmasters at the Southern California Genealogy Society Jamboree in Burbank, California.  She had a lovely booth all set up with lots of family trees, and we admired them and dreamed about ordering one someday.  We looked at their pretty fan charts, and ancestor charts with photos, and just couldn't decide. Time went by…

In 2013 I met Janet Hvorka at her lovely booth again at the RootsTech genealogy conference in Salt Lake City.  This time we ooohed and ahhhhed over more new family tree charts and dreamed a bit more about having a nice tree to display on the wall.  There were big charts with lots of generations, all sizes and shapes, and even some that looked like real trees.  Our daughter was getting married so we decided to wait so we could put the happy couple on a future family tree.  Time went by…

In 2015 Janet Hvorka was at the New England Regional Genealogy Conference (NERGC)  in Providence Rhode Island, with her lovely booth and even more charts and trees.  She showed us all the new layouts and designs for family trees and multigeneration charts.  We were very excited because the happy couple, my daughter and son-in-law, were expecting our first grandchild.  We discussed a possible tree with Janet, and she explained how we could show all the ancestors, and our descendants on a family tree.  Wow!  We decided to wait until the baby was born so we could include the new name on the chart.  Time went by…

NERGC is a biennial conference, so this year at Springfield, Massachusetts we toured the vendor hall and – you guessed it – we bumped into Janet Hvorka and her lovely Family Chartmaster booth again.  Years had passed since we first thought of this possible family tree,  and even though the vendor hall had several other vendors selling custom charts, and even though our grandbaby is now almost two years old WE DID IT!  We gave Janet a down payment on a large wall chart with our family tree!  It was a new kind of tree (drawn like a real tree), just like the 19th century tree charts I have admired in the past (click here to see a HASKELL family tree I photographed at the NEHGS library in Boston:  https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/02/haskell-family-tree.html )

Well, you know me by now.  NERGC was in April, and it is now July.  Time went by…  as we considered all our options and finally submitted our GEDCOM file to Janet.  Then FamilyChartmasters got to work finagling all the generations and names into a free form tree with my ancestors on the right side branches, and Vincent’s ancestors on the left, and our descendants down in the roots.  We worked via email with a very patient and skillful employee named Christine.
Over the next few weeks Christine took our email suggestions and tweaked branches, added generations, and squeezed in hundreds of names.  The final result was wonderful!

Between email, this little booklet and the website
we were able to work with FamilyChartmasters to design
our family tree



We had the chart professionally framed and it hangs in our family room.  At a family birthday party last weekend everyone had fun finding their branch on the tree, or even finding their own name!  I don’t know if you can see in the photo because of the glare on the glass, but each leaf is not only labeled with a name, but the name of the country or state is on the leaf, too.  There are nine generations in the branches, and our grandchild is down below!





Thanks Janet, Christine and everyone at Family Chartmasters!  I would recommend their family trees to anyone who would like to hang a chart in their home. The process was easy, and well worth the time, affordable, and provided us with a real family heirloom.  We all love the final result!

The Family Chartmasters website:  https://familychartmasters.com/ 

Family Chartmasters at Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/FamilyChartMasters/


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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Our Family ChartMasters Heirloom Family Tree", Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 24, 2017, (https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/07/our-familychartmasters-heirloom-family.html: accessed [access date]). 

Saturday, July 22, 2017

Surname Saturday ~ MAVERICK of Dorchester, Massachusetts

A Map of Boston Harbor
Please note the locations of Noddle's Island,
Thompson's Island and Dorchester 

MAVERICK / MADERICKE / MATHERICKE / MAUERRICKE

John Maverick, my 11th great grandfather, graduated with a Bachelor’s degree from Exeter College at Oxford University on 8 July 1599, and with a Master’s degree on 7 July 1603.  At the time of his second degree he was already an ordained minister at the town of Exeter. He was also called to be the rector at Beaworthy, in Devon, until he resigned just before coming to New England with the Winthrop fleet.  He arrived on the ship Mary and John on 30 May 1630.  John Maverick became a freeman in Dorchester on 18 May 1631, and he was the minister there until he died in 1636.

John Maverick married Mary Gye at Islington in 1600.  She had a long royal ancestry stretching back to the Plantagenets sketched out in the New England Historic Genealogical Register Volume 115, pages 248 – 253.  They had a son, Samuel, who married the widow Amias (Cole) Thompson, who was the wife of David Thompson (1592 – 1628), my 9th great grandfather, who lived on Thompson’s Island in Boston Harbor.  Another son, Moses, was my 10th great grandfather.

Moses Maverick’s first wife was my 10th great grandmother.  Her name was Remember Allerton, and she was a five year old passenger on the Mayflower, along with her parents and siblings. Moses owned land in Dorchester, which he sold and removed to Salem in 1634.  He lived in Marblehead, contiguous to Salem, in 1635.  He rented Noddle’s Island in Boston Harbor, now known as East Boston near the airport. There is still a Maverick subway station in East Boston, and a Maverick Square. It’s interesting that two of my ancestors owned islands in Boston Harbor.

Samuel and Moses Maverick were notorious slave owners, both Indians and Africans.  The first colonial slave ship was built in Marblehead in 1636, and Moses Maverick was probably an investor.  Moses was part of the effort to split the peninsula of Marblehead off from Salem, and he was one of the first Marblehead selectmen.   There are many stories and books about Samuel and Moses Maverick so I won’t repeat them here.  They are some of my most notorious “black sheep” ancestors. You can read more about Samuel and Moses Maverick and their slaves at Bill West’s blog post here:  http://westinnewengland.blogspot.com/2012/01/thomas-slave.html

Moses and Remember had seven children. Their daughter, Abigail Maverick (1645 – 1686) is my 9th great grandmother.  She was the first wife of Samuel Ward of Salem, and they had seven children.  Major Samuel Ward died on the Expedition to Quebec, Canada led by Sir William Phips.  This was a fleet of 30 ships from Boston, and about two thousand men, which suffered a great loss.  Four ships sank and many men died.  Some of the surviving men brought back smallpox, which spread throughout Boston and Dorchester, killing another 57 people.

Some MAVERICK resources:

The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620 - 1633, by Robert Charles Anderson, 1995, Volume II, pages 1241 – 1243 for a sketch of John Maverick and his children.

Mayflower Families Through Five Generations, Volume Seventeen: Isaac Allerton [one of the Silver books series], 1998, pages 4 – 6 for Moses Maverick and Remember Allerton, and pages 9 – 10 for Abigail Maverick and Samuel Ward.  Martha Ward and John Tuttle are outlined on pages 26 – 27, and Martha Tuttle and Mark Haskell are on pages 65 – 66. 

Royal Descents of 600 Immigrants to the American Colonies of the United States, by Gary Boyd Roberts, 2008, page 377.

Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, by Douglas Richardson and Kimball G. Everingham, 1990, page 370.

There is an entire blog about Samuel Maverick at this link [unknown author]:  http://samuelmaverick.blogspot.com/


My MAVERICK genealogy:

Generation 1:  John Maverick, son of Peter Maverick and Dorothy Tucke, baptized 28 October 1578 in Awliscombe, Devonshire, England, died 3 February 1636 at Dorchester, Massachusetts;  married on 28 October 1600 to Mary Gye, daughter of Robert Gye and Drace Dowrish.  She died after 9 October 1666 in Massachusetts. Nine children.

Generation 2:  Moses Maverick, baptized 3 November 1611 in Huish, Devonshire, England and died 28 January 1686 in Marblehead, Massachusetts; married before 6 May 1635 in Marblehead to Remember Allerton, daughter of Isaac Allerton and Mary Norris (Mayflower passengers).  She was born about 1614 in Leyden, Holland and died before 22 October 1656.  Six children.

Generation 3: Abigail Maverick, baptized 12 January 1645 in Salem, Massachusetts, died before January 1686; married about 1662 in Ipswich to Samuel Ward, son of Samuel Ward and Mary Hilliard.  He was baptized 18 November 1638 in Hingham, Massachusetts and died between 30 July 1689 and 12 March 1691 during the Expedition to Quebec, Canada.

Generation 4:  Martha Ward m. John Tuthill
Generation 5:  Martha Tuthill m. Mark Haskell
Generation 6: Lucy Haskell m. Jabez Treadwell
Generation 7: Nathaniel Treadwell m. Mary Hovey
Generation 8: Jabez Treadwell m. Betsey Jillings Homan
Generation 9: Eliza Ann Treadwell m. Abijah Hitchings
Generation 10: Abijah Franklin Hitchings m. Hannah Eliza Lewis
Generation 11: Arthur Treadwell Hitchings m. Florence Etta Hoogerzeil
Generation 12:  Gertrude Matilda Hitchings m. Stanley Elmer Allen (my grandparents)

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, “ Surname Saturday ~ MAVERICK of Dorchester, Massachusetts“, Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 22, 2017, (https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/07/surname-saturday-maverick-of-dorchester.html: accessed [access date]). 

Friday, July 21, 2017

Our House in Holden ~ Photo Friday

These images are from my grandmother's slide collection.  They were given to be my a first cousin,  and were digitized by another cousin's son for me.  Thanks, Lani and Rob!



My grandfather must have taken these images when my grandparents came to visit us at our new house in Holden, Massachusetts.  We lived at 4 Scenic Drive, and moved there in January 1968.  It looks like this was that following fall, because the leaves of the trees are starting to turn colors.

In the top photo it looks like my sister was waiting on the front steps for me to come home from school.  I was in second grade, and she was about four years old. If you look closely you can see my grandmother, Bertha, peeking through the screen door!

The second photo shows our house from the side.  It was a very small ranch house.  You can barely see me sitting on the front steps.

------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Our House in Holden ~ Photo Friday", Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 21, 2017, (https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/07/our-house-in-holden-photo-friday.html: accessed [access date]).

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Weathervane Wednesday ~ The first time I've seen THIS animal on a weathervane!

Weathervane Wednesday is an on-going series of photographs I post weekly.  I started out by publishing only weather vanes from the Londonderry area, but now I've been finding interesting weather vanes from all over New England.  Sometimes these weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are very unique.  Often, my readers tip me off to some very special and unusual weather vanes.

Today's weather vane is from somewhere in New Hampshire.

Do you know the location of weather vane #320?  Scroll down to see the answer...




This unique alpaca weathervane can be seen atop the Someday Farm's barn in Canterbury, New Hampshire. We were here during the May 2017 New Hampshire Open Doors tour, when businesses and artisans all over the Granite State hold open houses for touring and shopping.  There are NH Open Doors tours every fall and spring. 

It was fun to tour this alpaca farm, to see the newborn alpacas and to feel the super soft yarns and knitted items made from this yarn.  The owner of the farm said she remembered the day her custom weathervane and cupola were raised by crane over her new barn.  I told her I had never seen an alpaca weathervane.  Have you?   



Some Day Alpaca Farm website http://www.somedayfarm.com/

New Hampshire Open Doors https://nhopendoors.com/


----------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~ The first time I've seen THIS animal on a weathervane!", Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 19, 2017, (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/07/weathervane-wednesday-first-time-ive.html: accessed [access date]).

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Anna (Long) Converse, buried 1691 in Woburn, Massachusetts

This tombstone was photographed at the Old Burial Ground (First Burial Ground) in Woburn, Massachusetts.



HERE LYES Ye BODY OF
ANN CONVERS WIFE
TO JAMES CONVERS
AGED 69 YEARS
DIED AUGUST THE
10 1691

Anna (Long) Converse was my 8th great grandmother. She was born 1 June 1623 in St. Albans, England, and died 10 August 1691 in Woburn, Massachusetts. She was the first wife of Lt. James Converse, son of Deacon Edward Converse and Sarah Parker. Anna and James were married on 24 October 1643 in Woburn. 

Anna was the daughter of Robert Long and Sarah Taylor of Charlestown, Massachusetts.  They came to New England aboard the ship Defence on 7 July 1635.  Robert Long operated an inn in Bedfordshire, and owned the famous “Three Cranes” in Charlestown.  This inn stayed in the Long family for 100 years, and burned on 17 June 1777 when Charlestown was set on fire by the British when they evacuated Boston.

You can read more about “The Three Cranes” inn of Charlestown, Massachusetts, where Anna grew up, in this blog post:

My LONG lineage:

-----------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, “Tombstone Tuesday ~ Anna (Long) Converse, buried 1691 in Woburn, Massachusetts”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 18, 2017, (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/07/tombstone-tuesday-anna-long-converse.html: accessed [access date]). 

Saturday, July 15, 2017

Surname Saturday ~ WARD of Hingham and Charlestown, Massachusetts


WARD

Samuel Ward, my 10th great grandfather, was an early settler at Hingham, Massachusetts.  He might have been the brother of the Henry Ward who was buried there on 15 May 1642.  His first wife was Mary Hilliard, who died at Hingham 28 November 1638 ten days after giving birth to my 9th great grandfather, Samuel, Jr.  Mary had given four children to Samuel, Sr.  His second wife was Frances Pitcher, the widow of a Mr. Reycroft.  Frances died in 1690 and is buried at Copp’s Hill Burial Ground in Boston.

Samuel first owned land in Hingham that is now part of the town of Hull, Massachusetts. He removed to Charlestown where he owned a lot of land and was known as “Mr.”  He died on 31 August 1682 in Charlestown, and his will mentions his wife, Frances, his son Samuel (and Samuel’s children), son-in-law Isaac Lobdell, and also his daughter Mary and her husband Ambrose Gale (brother of my 8th great grandfather Edmund Gale (1640- 1716) of Beverly, Massachusetts).  He left an island between Hingham and Hull to Harvard College  [Middlesex County Probate, File #23742].  Samuel was buried at the Phipps Street Burial Ground in Charlestown.

His son, Samuel Ward, Jr., my 9th great grandfather, died in the battle against Quebec in 1690 serving under Sir William Phips.  He married very well, first to my 9th great grandmother, Abigail Maverick, the daughter of Moses Maverick and Mayflower passenger Remember Allerton.  His second wife was Sarah Bradstreet, widow of Richard Hubbard, and daughter of Governor Simon Bradstreet and the poet Anne Dudley (she was the daughter of Governor Thomas Dudley).   Their daughter, Martha Ward, my 8th great grandmother, married John Tuthill of Ipswich in 1689. 

Some WARD resources:

Ethel Farrington Smith, “Seventeenth Century Hull, Massachusetts, and her People”, New England Historic Genealogical Society Register, Volume 143, October 1989, pages 346 – 349.

Early Families of Hull, Massachusetts, by Ethel Farrington Smith, 2007, pages 197 – 199.

The Genealogies and Estates of Charlestown, Massachusetts, by Thomas Bellows Wyman, Volume 2, pages 993 – 994.

My WARD genealogy:

Generation 1: Samuel Ward, born about 1605 in England, died 31 August 1682 in Charlestown, Massachusetts; married first to Mary Hilliard. She died on 28 November 1638 in Hingham, Massachusetts.  He married second to Frances Pitcher, widow of Mr. Reycroft.

Generation 2: Samuel Ward, son of Samuel Ward and Mary Hilliard, baptized 18 November 1638 in Hingham, died between 30 July 1689 and 12 March 1691 during the Expedition to Quebec, Canada under Sir William Phips;  he married first to Abigail Maverick, daughter of Moses Maverick and Remember Allerton (they had seven children).  She was baptized 12 January 1645 in Salem and died before January 1686.  He married second to Sarah Bradstreet, widow of Richard Hubbard, and daughter of Simon Bradstreet and Anne Dudley.

Generation 3:  Martha Ward, born 16 September 1672 in Salem, died 17 August 1723 in Ipswich; married first on 3 December 1689 in Ipswich to John Tuthill, son of Simon Tuthill and Sarah Cogswell.  He was born 22 April 1666 in Ipswich, and died 27 February 1715 in Ipswich.  They had eleven children.  She married second to George Hart on 10 November 1722 in Ipswich.

Generation 4:  Martha Tuthill m. Mark Haskell
Generation 5:  Lucy Haskell m. Jabez Treadwell
Generation 6:  Nathaniel Treadwell m. Mary Hovey
Generation 7:  Jabez Treadwell m. Betsey  Jillings Homan
Generation 8:  Eliza Ann Treadwell m. Abijah Hitchings
Generation 9:  Abijah Franklin Hitchings m. Hannah Eliza Lewis
Generation 10:  Arthur Treadwell Hitchings m. Florence Etta Hoogerzeil
Generation 11: Gertrude Matilda Hitchings m. Stanley Elmer Allen (my grandparents)

--------------------------------


Heather Wilkinson Rojo, “Surname Saturday ~ WARD of Hingham and Charlestown, Massachusetts”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 15, 2017, (https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/07/surname-saturday-ward-of-hingham-and.html: accessed [access date]). 

Friday, July 14, 2017

Hula Hoop ~ Photo Friday

These images are from my grandmother's slide collection.  They were given to be my a first cousin,  and were digitized by my another cousin's son for me.  Thanks, Lani and Rob!




These photos must date from about 1968, based on my sister being about four years old in these photos.  It looks like we are in a relative's back yard, but after questioning a few family members we can't identify the property. My sister and Dad must have been trying out a hula hoop for the first time. I wonder if I tried it, too?

I love the blurred "action shot" of these images. The car in the background sets the time period in the 1960s. And the clothes line!  And my sister's little mini skirt, too.

My grandfather must have taken these photos.  I had never seen them before I received these digitized images.

------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Hula Hoop ~ Photo Friday", Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 14, 2017, (https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/07/hula-hoop-photo-friday.html: accessed [access date]).

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Weathervane Wednesday ~ Another Ancestral Church

Weathervane Wednesday is an on-going series of photographs I post weekly.  I started out by publishing only weather vanes from the Londonderry area, but now I've been finding interesting weather vanes from all over New England.  Sometimes these weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are very unique.  Often, my readers tip me off to some very special and unusual weather vanes.

Today's weather vane is from somewhere in New Hampshire.

Do you know the location of weather vane #319?  Scroll down to see the answer...






This is the First Congregational Church of Hampton, New Hampshire.  It was founded by the Reverend Stephen Bachiler in 1638.  He was my 11th great grandfather, who not only founded the town, but he was also the father of ten children so he left a lot of descendants in New Hampshire!  There have been six different meeting house buildings here over the years, and today's pastor, the Rev. Deborah Knowlton,  is the 40th minister of this congregation.  She invited me and other descendants of the Batchelder and other founding families to the 375th anniversary a few years ago. You can read about that church service HERE.

The scrollwork arrow weathervane is typical of many seen atop New England churches.  Next to the banner style of weathervane, it is the most commonly seen.  This kind of weathervane became popular in the early and mid 1800s when they were mass produced by machines in factories in Waltham, Massachusetts.  The factory made arrows and banners were exceptionally fancy compared to the more simple ones made by hand.


A blog post about the Hampton Congregational Church:
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2013/09/375th-anniversary-of-first.html

A blog post about my BATCHELDER genealogy:
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2015/10/surname-saturday-batchelder-of-hampton.html  

The First Congregational Church, Hampton, website:
http://www.fcchampton.org/



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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~ Another Ancestral Church", Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 12, 2017, (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/07/weathervane-wednesday-another-ancestral.html: accessed [access date]).

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Patience Converse, buried 1707 in Woburn, Massachusetts

This tombstone was photographed at the Old Burial Ground in Woburn, Massachusetts


  MEMENTO                      FUGIT
  MORI                                HORA

HERE LYES Ye BODY
OF PASHENCE CONVER
DAUGHTER OF MAJOR
JAMES & HANNAH CONVER
WHO DEPARTED THIS
LIFE JULY Ye 25th
1707  IN Ye 21
YEAR OF HER AGE.


Patience Converse, my 6th great aunt,  was born on 6 November 1686 in Woburn, and died unmarried 23 July 1707.  She was the daughter of Major James Converse (1645 – 1706) and Hannah Carter (1651 – 1691).  She came from a family of nine siblings, and I descend from her brother, Robert Converse (1677 – 1736) who married Mary Sawyer.  

My CONVERSE lineage:
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/09/surname-saturday-converse-of-woburn.html   


--------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday ~ Patience Converse, buried 1707 in Woburn, Massachusetts", Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 11, 2017, (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/06/tombstone-tuesday-patience-converse.html: accessed [access date]). 

Saturday, July 8, 2017

Surname Saturday ~ TYBOTT of Gloucester, Massachusetts


TYBOTT, TIBOTT, TIBBETT

Walter Tybott (1584 – 1651), my 10th great grandfather, was from Wales. He was a member of Rev. Richard Blynman’s congregation.  This group of Puritans followed Rev. Blynman to New England about 1640 when he was forced from his church in Chepstow, Monmouthshire for his Puritan preaching.  It is thought that “The Blynman Party” (also known as “The Welsh Party”) was recruited by Gov. John Winslow.  They arrived in Plymouth, settled in Marshfield, and then Gloucester, Massachusetts in 1641.  Some went on to New London, Connecticut ten years later.  Apparently Walter Tybott and his family remained in Gloucester.

The Plymouth Colony records indicate that on 2 March 1640/41 Walter Tibbott, and others were nominated to become Freemen.  He was made Freeman on 19 May 1642. Sometime soon after becoming Freeman Walter Tybott went to Gloucester with others from The Blynman Party.  He was elected Selectman 1642 – 1645.

His will was proved at Salem Court 5 June 165 and it names his children and grandchildren "item i giue to my dafter mari harskol the wif of william hasskole fifteene pound in good pay. I gieu to josef hasskol son of william my farm at chebake. I guie to william hasskolls other sonnes twenti shelenes a pece to put to som good implement.” He also named his grandchild "Richard Dicke," granddaughter Elizabeth Dike, "son clark" [his daughter Agnes’s second husband] and "Sabelone" [Zebulon] Hill, soon-to-be-husband of granddaughter Elizabeth Dike.

Apparently he had only two daughters, Mary and Agnes.  I descend from Mary Tybott (1628 – 1693) who married William Haskell in Salem, Massachusetts in 1643.  They had nine children all born in Gloucester. Mary died on 16 August 1693 in Gloucester, and William died four days later.

Some TYBOTT resources:

"Henry Tibbetts & some of his Descendants", NEHGS Register, Vol 98, page. 58.  
“The Blynman Party," NEHGS Register, Vol 53, page. 234 - 241.
Ira J. Haskell, Chronicles of the Haskell Family, Ira J. Haskell, 1943.
Plymouth Records, Vol. 2, page 8.

My TYBOTT lineage:

Generation 1: Walter Tybott, born about 1584 in Wales, died 14 August 1651; married Mary UNKNOWN.  She remarried to John Harding on 22 April 1652 in Plymouth.  Mary died 21 February 1681 in Gloucester. Two daughters with Walter Tybott.

Generation 2: Mary Tybott, born 6 November 1628 in Chepstow, Monmouthshire, Wales, died 24 August 1693 in Gloucester; married 6 November 1643 in Salem to William Haskell, son of William Haskell and Elinor Foule.  He was baptized 8 November 1618 in Charlton, Musgrove, Somersetshire, England, and died 20 August 1693 in Gloucester. Nine children.

Generation 3: Mark Haskell m. Elizabeth Giddings
Generation 4:  Mark Haskell m. Martha Tuthill
Generation 5:  Lucy Haskell m. Jabez Treadwell
Generation 6:  Nathaniel Treadwell m. Mary Hovey
Generation 7:  Jabez Treadwell m. Betsey Jillings Homan
Generation 8: Eliza Ann Treadwell m. Abijah Hitchings
Generation 9:  Abijah Franklin Hitchings m. Hannah Eliza Lewis
Generation 10:  Arthur Treadwell Hitchings m. Florence Etta Hoogerzeil
Generation 11: Gertrude Matilda Hitchings m. Stanley Elmer Allen

----------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, “Surname Saturday ~ TYBOTT of Gloucester, Massachusetts”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 8, 2017, (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/07/surname-saturday-tybott-of-gloucester.html: accessed [access date]).