Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Weathervane Wednesday ~ A Pet Husky

I post another in a series of weather vane photographs every Wednesday.  This started with images of weathervanes from the Londonderry, New Hampshire area, but now I've found interesting weather vanes all across New England and across the globe.  Sometimes my weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are interesting.  Often my readers tip me off to some very unique or unusual weathervanes, too!  If you know a great weather vane near you, let me know if you'd like to have it featured on this blog.

Today's weather vane was photographed in New Hampshire.

Do you know the location of weathervane post #348?  Scroll down to find the answer.





While traveling on Route 123 through the small town of Marlow, New Hampshire we happened to see this amusing weathervane on the side of the road.  I thought it was a wolf howling at the moon until I read more about the independent alternative school at this address.  The weathervane is actually a two dimensional depiction of their pet Alaskan Husky dog, named Kroka.

Kroka Expeditions is a wilderness adventure school founded in 1996 by Misha Golfman and Lynne Boudreau.  The school moved to this organic farm in Marlow, New Hampshire in 2007.

Kroka Expeditions website:  http://www.kroka.org/  

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~ A Pet Husky", Nutfield Genealogy, posted January 31, 2017, (https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/01/weathervane-wednesday-pet-husky.html: accessed [access date]).

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Tombstone Tuesday ~ George Wilson, 1747, and Jenit Wilson, 1777, Londonderry, New Hampshire

This tombstone was photographed at the Forest Hill Cemetery in Derry, New Hampshire.  In 1747 this was the town of Londonderry, New Hampshire.


HERE LYES THE BODY OF MR
GEORGE WILSON SON TO MR
JAMES AND JENIT WILSON
HE DIED MAY 29, 1747 AGED 17
YEARS.  ALSO THE BODY OF MRs
JENIT WILSON DAUGHTER OF
MR AND Mrs JENIT WILSON
SHE DIED APRIL 13, 1777 AGED 36

These two siblings are the children of  James Wilson (1680 - 1772) and Jennet Taggart (1703 - 1800), early Nutfield settlers.  This gravestone was cleaned by the Friends of Forest Hill Cemetery on 7 August 2009.  It is decorated with the typical geometric style carvings typical of the early Scots Irish tombstones in Londonderry, similar to those attributed to the Scots Irish carver John Wright "The Hieroglyphic Carver".  According to the History of Londonderry by Rev. Parker, there were four Wilson siblings (Jenit, Alexander, Annis and Margaret). 

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday ~ George  Wilson, 1747, and Jenit Wilson, 1777, Londonderry, New Hampshire", Nutfield Genealogy, posted January 30, 2018, (  https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/01/tombstone-tuesday-george-wilson-1747.html: accessed [access date]).

Monday, January 29, 2018

February 2018 Genealogy and Local History Calendar



Genealogy Events Calendar

For last minute updates, see the “Nutfield Genealogy” Facebook page at this link:  https://www.facebook.com/nutfield.gen/ 


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January 31, Wednesday, noon, Indian Doctresses: Race, Labor, and Medicine in the 19th Century United States, at the Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Presented by Angela Hudson of Texas A&M University.  Free to the public.


February 1, Thursday, noon, Literary Lunch Lecture: Records of Writers, at the Mount Auburn Cemetery, 580 Mount Auburn Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts.  Curator of Historical Collections Meg. L. Winslow will share a cross section of materials from the archives and library relating to Harriet Jacobs, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Fanny Fern and others.  Free to the public. Tickets available at Eventbrite:  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/literary-lunch-lecture-records-of-writers-highlights-from-the-historical-collections-tickets-37953202049?aff=efbeventtix 

February 1, Thursday, 4pm, , Harnessing History:  On the Trail of New Hampshire’s State Dog, the Chinook, at the University of New Hampshire,  Dimond Library Special Collections, 18 Library Way, Durnham, New Hampshire.  Presented by Bob Cotrell.   Hosted by UNH.  Free to the public.  Sponsored by a grant from the New Hampshire Humanities Council.

February 2, Genealogical Resources at the Massachusetts Historical Society, at the New England Historic Genealogical Society Library, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Presented by Catherine Allgor and Peter Drummey.  Free to the public as part of the First Friday Lecture Series. 

February 3, Saturday, 10am, NARA Boston:  Why, When and How, at the Worcester Public Library, 3 Salem Square, Worcester, Massachusetts. Sponsored by the Worcester Regional Chapter of the Massachusetts Society of Genealogists.  www.msoginc.org

February 3, Saturday, 10am, New Visitor Tour of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Free to the public.  No registration necessary.  Tour attendees are welcome to stay and use the library following the tour.

February 3, Saturday, 1pm, Greater Portland Genealogical Society Meeting at the First Congregational Church, 301 Cottage Road, South Portland, Maine.  Free to the public, donations accepted.  Refreshments at 12:30.  http://gpcmgs.brakeley.net/

February 4, Sunday, 1 – 3pm, Cathedral Tour, Cathedral of Saint Joseph, 145 Lowell Street, Manchester, New Hampshire.  Led by the diocesan archivist, Jim O’Connell, and learn more about the history and art of the Cathedral.  Free to the public.

February 4, Sunday, 2pm, New England Quilts and the Stories They Tell, at the Wilmot Community Association Red Barn, 64 Village Road, Wilmot, New Hampshire.  Pam Weeks presents how quilting not just told stories, but weaves in world history, women’s history, and industrial history. Participants are invited to bring one quilt for identification and story sharing.  In case of bad weather, the snow date will be February 11th.  Free to the public.

February 4, Sunday, 1 – 4pm, American Canadian Genealogical Society BrickWall Meeting, Please email your brickwall challenge a few days prior to acgs@acgs.org   In case of inclement weather call to confirm 603-622-1554.  See https://acgs.org/

February 4, Sunday, 2 – 4pm, Black Heritage Trail of NH – Tea Talk, Reclaiming Native American Culture, at the Portsmouth Public Library, Levenson Community Room, Portsmouth , NH.  Presented by Paul Pouliot, Chief Speaker for the Cowasuck Band of the Pennacook & Abenaki People; Siobham Senier, Professor of English, UNH; and Liz Green Charlebois.

February 6, Tuesday, noon, “Why is Fitz Henry Lane’s Lithographs so Special?”, at the Boston Athenaeum, 10 ½ Beacon Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Free to the public.  No registration required.  Presented by Georgia Barnhill. 

February 7, Wednesday, 6pm, People Before Highways:  Boston Activists, Urban Planners, and a New Movement for City Making, at the Boston Public Library, Commonwealth Salon, 700 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Presented by Karilyn Crockett.  Free to the public.

February 7, Wednesday, 6:30pm, New Hampshire on Skis, at the Hill Library, 1151 Parker Mountain Road, Strafford, New Hampshire.  Professor E. John B. Allen presents a unique part of New Hampshire history.  Sponsored by a grant from the New Hampshire Humanities Council.  Free to the public.

February 8, Thursday, 6pm, Growing Up with the Country:  Family, Race and Nation after the Civil War, at the Boston Public Library, Commonwealth Salon, 700 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Presented by author Kendra Taira Field.  Free to the public.

February 8, Thursday, 2:30pm, Poor Houses and Poor Farms: The Hard Row for Paupers, at Tad’s Place Cultural Arts Center at Heritage Heights, 149 East Side Drive, Concord, New Hampshire.  Presented by Steve Taylor.  Free to the Public. Sponsored by Heritage Heights Retirement Community.

February 8, Thursday, 6:30pm, New England’s Colonial Meetinghouses and their impact on American Society, at the Seabrook Public Library, 25 Liberty Lane, Seabrook, New Hampshire.  Paul Wainwright tells the story of the society that built meetinghouses, and used them, and the lasting impact on American culture.  Free to the public.  Hosted by the Historical Society of Seabrook.

February 9, Friday, noon, Black Dolls in the Wenham Museum Collections, at the Wenham Museum, 132 Main Street, Wenham, Massachusetts.  Presented by retired museum doll curator, Dianne Buck.  Bring a lunch from home and enjoy this during our fifth installment of our “Brown Bag Lunch Series”.  Free to the public.

February 9, Friday, 7pm, Where the Bolt of Cupid Fell, at the Salem Witch House, 301 ½ Essex Street, Salem, Massachusetts.  Tickets $10 each.  Presented by Dr. Alexander Cummins.  Learn the occult theories and magical practices, folk magic and hoodoo of love potions.

February 10, Saturday, 9:30am – 4:30pm, For Those Who Served:  Researching Veteran Ancestors from Colonial Conflicts to World War II, at the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Presented by David Allen Lambert.  Cost $125 includes five lectures, breakfast and lunch.  Register here:  https://shop.americanancestors.org/products/researching-veteran-ancestors

February 10, Saturday, 10am – 11:30am, History Hike – Garrisons in the Colonial Landscape,  meet up at the Raymond and Simone Savage Wildlife Preserve, South Berwick, Maine.  Limited to 25 people, and reservations are required.  Call the Great Works Regional Land Trust at 207-646-3604 or email info@gwrlt.org  Explore Shorey’s Brook, restored by dam removal in 2011. 

February 10, Saturday, 10:30am, Naugatuck Valley Genealogy Club:  Research Like a Pro!  Applying the Genealogical Proof Standard, at the Prospect Library, 17 Center Street, Prospect, Connecticut.  Speaker Marian Wood.  http://naugatuckvalleygenealogyclub.webs.com/

February 10, Saturday, 10:30am, Connecticut Ancestry Society DNA Roundtable, at the Stamford History Center, 1508 High Ridge Road, Stamford, Connecticut.  Lead by certified genealogist and former biology teacher Nora Galvin.  Bring your questions and your relatives who are reluctant to test!  Free to the public.  www.connecticutancestry.org 

February 10, Saturday, 1:30pm, Be a Good Ancestor – Because a Descendant is Going to Have Questions, at the Acton Memorial Library, 486 Main Street, Acton, Massachusetts.  Sponsored by the Middlesex Chapter of the Massachusetts Society of Genealogists.  Presented by Seema-Jayne Kenney.  www.msoginc.org 

February 10, Saturday, 2pm, Italian Genealogy Program, at the Memorial Hall Library, 2 North Main Street, Andover, Massachusetts.  Sponsored by the Discover Your Past Genealogy Club and Friends of Memorial Hall Library, and presented by professional genealogist Jenny Tonks.  Free to the public.

February 10, Saturday, 1 – 5pm, Images from the past: History of Photography in New England, at the Otis House, 141 Cambridge Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  An introduction to the photo collections at the Historic New England Library and Archives by Lorna Condon, senior curator, and Sally Pierce, curator emerita of prints and photographs.   $30 Historic New England members, $45 non-members.

February 10, Saturday, 6pm, Dearest Dove: The Love Letters of Nathaniel and Sophia Hawthorne, at the House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street, Salem, Massachusetts.  Tickets available at www.store.7gables.org  Members $15, General public $20.  The love letters will be read by reenactors, and joined by local playwrite Anne Lucas.  A wine and chocolate reception before the performance is included. Kid Friendly.

February 11, Sunday, 2pm, The Genealogical Resources of the Maine State Archives, at the Augusta City Center, in the City Council Chambers, 16 Cony Street, Augusta, Maine.  Part of the lecture series "Bring Out Your Dead! The Art of Researching Maine & New England Ancestry” hosted by the Fort Western living history museum.   Presented by Samuel Howes, archivist at the Maine State Archives.  Free to the public.  Recommended donation of $5 for nonmembers.

February 11, Sunday, 2pm, Abraham and Mary Lincoln:  The Long and the Short of It, at the Lawrence Barn, 28 Depot Road, Hollis, New Hampshire.  Hosted by the Hollis Social Library.  Presented by Steve and Sharon Wood who will portray President and Mrs. Lincoln.  Free to the public thanks to a grant by the New Hampshire Humanities Council.

February 11, Sunday, 2pm, Finding My Irish Roots, at the Felton-Smith Historic Site, Felton Street, Peabody, Massachusetts. Presented by genealogist and historian Ellen Alden.  Free to members, non-members $5.  Call 978-531-0805 for more information.
 
February 17, Saturday, noon – 3pm, Breaking Down Brick Walls with Collateral Research, at the Centre Congregational Church, 5 Summer Street, Lynnfield, Massachusetts, hosted by the Essex County Society of Genealogists, and presented by Marian Pierre-Louis. Bring your own lunch and social hour at noon, lecture at 1pm. 

February 17, Saturday, 2 – 3pm, Gadgets and Gizmos, at the Phillips House, 34 Chestnut Street, Salem, Massachusetts.  Enjoy a behind-the-scenes tour of Phillips House exploring the inventions and innovations necessary for running a “modern” early twentieth century household.  $5 Historic New England members, $10 non-members.

February 17, Saturday, 7 – 10pm, The Jane Austen Ball, at the Old Town Hall, 32 Derby Square, Salem, Massachusetts.  Tickets available https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07eetf4dbna09779ef&oseq=&c=&ch=    Dress of the Regency period is not required.  All dances will be taught throughout the evening.  No partner required.  Live music and refreshments. 


February 18, Sunday, 2pm, Maine Cemeteries and Court Records, at the Augusta City Center, in the City Council Chambers, 16 Cony Street, Augusta, Maine.  Part of the lecture series "Bring Out Your Dead! The Art of Researching Maine & New England Ancestry” hosted by the Fort Western living history museum.   Presented by Cheryl Willis Patten of the Maine Old Cemetery Association, and Richard Bridges, title attorney.  Free to the public.  Recommended donation of $5 for nonmembers.

February 18, Sunday, 2 – 4pm, Black Heritage Trail of NH- Tea Talk “Sites of Memory: Reconstructing the Past, at the Portsmouth Public Library, Levenson Community Room, Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Presented by Senator David Watters; Eric Aldrich, Independent scholar; Joel Christian Gill, American Cartoonist and graphic novelist.  Free to the public.

February 21, Wednesday, 10am, New Visitor Tour of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Free to the public.  No registration necessary.  Tour attendees are welcome to stay and use the library following the tour.

February 22 – 24, Thursday – Saturday, Winter Weekend Research Getaway, at the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Three days of research, consultations, lectures and social events while exploring the rich offerings at the NEHGS research library.  Register soon, it fills up fast!  https://shop.americanancestors.org/products/winter-research-getaway

February 22, Thursday, 6:30pm, Life on the Home Front, at the Portsmouth Public Library, 175 Parrott Ave, Portsmouth, New Hampshire.  Free to the public. Local author Linda Shenton Matchett will present how Americans coped during World War II at home with the workforce, ration coupons, lack of clothing and other goods.

February 22, Thursday, 7 -9pm, Climbing Your Family Tree Genealogy Classes, at the Greenwich High School, 10 Hillside, Greenwich, Connecticut.  Sponsored by the Greenwich Adult & Continuing Education in three two part units:  February 22 and March 1 7 – 9pm,  March 15 and 22 7 – 9pm,  March 29 and April 5 7 – 9pm, $49 for each unit.  Open to all ages and levels.  See page 11 of this online document  http://view.flipdocs.com/html5/?id=10022693_729272&P=0#10

February 22, Thursday, 7:30pm, Taverns, Ales and Alcohol on the Piscataqua’s Forgotten Frontier.  At the Berwick Academy Arts Center, in Berwick, Maine.  Presented by historian Dr. Emerson Baker. 

February 24, 10am – 11am, Saturday, Henry Longfellow Birthday Celebration, at the Longfellow House, 105 Brattle Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Lecture by Susan Maycock and Charles Sullivan, cake and refreshments.  Weather permitting we will visit the Longfellow tomb, too. 

February 25, 11:45 am, Leslie’s Retreat Community Reenactment, to be held at 9 North Street, Salem, Massachusetts. An informal reenactment of Colonel Leslie’s 1775 march to Salem, where the townspeople taunted him.  To be part of the British Army meet at 11:30 at Hamilton Hall and be ready to walk a mile.  Townspeople to hurl colonial insults meet at the First Church UU in Salem at 11:45am.  Or stand your ground with the militia and meet at 11:50 at the corner of Federal and North Streets.  All are invited back to First Church for drinks and refreshments.  Kid Friendly. Hosted by the Salem Historical Society and Historic Salem, Inc.


February 25, Sunday, 2pm, DNA Research, at the Augusta City Center, in the City Council Chambers, 16 Cony Street, Augusta, Maine.  Part of the lecture series "Bring Out Your Dead! The Art of Researching Maine & New England Ancestry” hosted by the Fort Western living history museum.   Presented by Nancy Milliken Mason, DNA research consultant.  Free to the public.  Recommended donation of $5 for nonmembers.

February 25, Sunday, 1:30 – 4pm, Two part Program: Daniel Horowitz – Plan your Roots Trip to Eastern Europe and Panel – What to Expect from the 2018 Jewish Genealogy Conference in Warsaw, at Temple Emanuel, 385 Word Street, Newton Centre, Massachusetts. Sponsored by the Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Boston.  Free to member, $5 for non-members.  Refreshments will be served.

February 27, Tuesday, 6:30pm, Ingalls Memorial Library Genealogy Workshop, at 203 Main Street, Rindge, New Hampshire.  Presented by Karla McLeod.  Free access to Ancestry in the library.  http://www.rindgenh.org/towncloud/calendar/entity-6

February 27, Tuesday, 7 -9pm, Central Massachusetts Genealogical Society Meeting, at the American Legion Post #129, 22 Elm Street, Gardner, Massachusetts.  Guests are welcome for a $2 donation.  See www.cmgso.org 


March 3, Saturday, 10:30am, Autosomal DNA Workshop, at the Danbury Public Library, 170 Main Street, Danbury, Connecticut.  Led by Nora Galvin, certified genealogist.  Free and open to the public.  Snow date: March 10thwww.connecticutancestry.org 


March 4, Sunday, 2pm, Town Records: Hog Reeves, Fish Cullers, Tithing Men and More, at the Augusta City Center, in the City Council Chambers, 16 Cony Street, Augusta, Maine.  Part of the lecture series "Bring Out Your Dead! The Art of Researching Maine & New England Ancestry” hosted by the Fort Western living history museum.   Presented by Carol P. McCoy, President of the Maine Genealogical Society.  Free to the public.  Recommended donation of $5 for nonmembers.


Looking Ahead:


 March 10, Saturday, 1pm, Genealogy Workshop: Immigration and Naturalization: Tracing Your immigrant Ancestors, at the New Hampshire Historical Society,  30 Park Street, Concord, New Hampshire, Tickets available online at Evenbrite: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/immigration-and-naturalization-tracing-your-immigrant-ancestors-workshop-registration-39258474153?aff=eac2  $35 for members, $50 non-members. 



 March 22 – 24, The New England Historic Genealogical Society’s Genealogical Skills Boot Camp, at the NEHGS library, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts. Take your research skills to the next level!  This intensive three day program will teach you how to tackle genealogical problems like a pro.  Lectures, small group discussions and activities, hands on exercises, and homework assignments.  Registration and information:  https://shop.americanancestors.org/products/genealogical-skills-boot-camp




April – American Canadian Genealogical Society Spring Conference, Manchester, New Hampshire.  Three sessions with speakers. Time to research in the library.  $5 at the door.  $10 prepaid bag lunch orders. 

 April 7-8, Massachusetts Genealogical Council 2018 Seminar, at the Courtyard by Marriot, Marlborough, Massachusetts.  DNA track with Jennifer Zinck on Saturday, and an all day track on genealogy with Dr. Thomas Jones on Sunday.  Register online for one or both days. http://www.massgencouncil.org/2017/2018-seminar/  


April 27, Friday, Genealogy Lock-In, at the Memorial Hall Library, 2 North Main Street, Andover, Massachusetts.  Spend an uninterrupted evening using MHL’s genealogy resources.  Reference librarians will be on hand to help your research. A dinner of sandwiches, chips and cookies is included.  $10 per person.


May 18, 19, 20, Roots 2018: An International Conference on Family History, presented by the Quebec Family History Society at McGill University, New Residence Hall, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. For more information www.qfhs.ca



July 7, Saturday, History Camp Boston, at Suffolk University Law School, Boston, Massachusetts.  and History Camp Weekend http://historycamp.org/boston 

 August 14 – 16 Scots Irish Reunion:  Bringing the Ulster Diaspora To Life, at Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine. Hosted by the St. Andrews Society of Maine and the Maine Ulster Scots Project.


13 September, Thursday – Saturday, The 2018 New York State Family History Conference, at Tarrytown, New York.  More information coming soon.


September 22, Saturday – The Fall Conference of the American Canadian Genealogical Society, to be held at the Puritan Back Room, Manchester, New Hampshire.


September 28 – 30, Old Planters Reunion, at Historic Beverly, 117 Cabot Street, Beverly, Massachusetts.  Save the date!  More information soon!


April 3-6, 2019,  New England Regional Genealogical Conference NERGC in Manchester, New Hampshire at the Radisson Hotel on Elm Street.  http://www.nergc.org/2019-conference/ for more information.


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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "February 2018 Genealogy and Local History Calendar", Nutfield Genealogy, posted January 29, 2018, (  https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/01/february-2018-genealogy-and-local.html: accessed [access date]). 

Saturday, January 27, 2018

Surname Saturday ~ CREE of Topsfield, Massachusetts


CREE / CRAY / CREIGH

My 7th great grandfather, Nicholas Cree, is a mystery.  I don’t know his birth or death, but only that he married Keziah Dwinell of Topsfield and had six children born there.  His marriage record says he was “Of Marblehead”.   This brickwall ancestor has many researchers searching for his origins, probably in Scotland. 

Not much is known of his son, Richard Cree (1727 – 1769), my 6th great grandfather.  I have his vital records, and his death record states he was “a middle aged man who was drownded”.    I descend from his eldest son, Stephen Cree (1760  - 1821), who married his bride, Hannah Smith, in the town of Holden, Massachusetts, many miles from Topsfield.  The interesting thing is that I was married in the town of Holden, too, about 200 years after the marriage of Stephen and Hannah Cree.  Hannah’s origins are unknown, but I found her birth record in Worcester in 1763, to her father, Joseph Smith.  Perhaps he is related to the Smith family of Topsfield? Another mystery.

My 4th great grandmother, Sarah Cree (1792 – 1835) married first at age 16 to John W. Ham in 1808 and had one child.  Then she remarried to James Phillips in Topsfield in 1815.  They had two children and he died young in 1820.  Sarah never remarried and died young herself in 1835.   Her daughter, my 3rd great grandmother, Hannah Phillips (about 1821 – 1851) also died young after having three children born in Salem.  

The Cree surname is considered to be Scots, a derivation of the same CREIGH or CRAY.  There are several DNA studies ongoing to find the origins of Nicholas Cree, the immigrant ancestor in New England.

Some CREE resources:

The CREE One-Name Study   http://www.cree.name/usa/topsfield.htm

The Historical Collections of the Topsfield Historical Society (some volumes available online at Archive.org, including Volumes nine and ten with the Topsfield marriage records)

The True Genealogy of the Dunnel and Dwinnell Family of New England, by Henry Gale Dunnel, 1862.

My CREE genealogy:

Generation 1:  Nicolas Cree married on 7 October 1723 in Topsfield, Massachusetts to Keziah Dwinel, daughter of John Dwinell and Mary Read.  She was born 14 December 1703 in Topsfield.  Six children born in Topsfield. 

Generation 2:  Richard Cree, born 13 August 1727 in Topsfield, died 15 April 1769 in Topsfield; married on 5 February 1756 in Topsfield to Ruth Johnson, daughter of Stephen Johnson and Rebecca Towne.  She was born 30 August 1731 in Topsfield and died 29 June 1800 in Topsfield.  Five children.

Generation 3:  Stephen Cree, was born 30 October 1760 in Topsfield, died 15 October 1821 in Topsfield; married on 27 February 1787 in Holden, Massachusetts to Hannah Smith, daughter of Joseph Smith of Worcester.  She was born 22 May 1763 in Worcester, and died 19 October 1839 in Topsfield.  Five children.

Generation 4:  Sarah Cree, born 30 September 1792 in Topsfield, died 3 May 1835 in Topsfield; married 6 August 1820 in Topsfield to James Phillips.  He was born about 1792 probably in Rowley, and died 5 April 1820 in Topsfield.  Two children.

Generation 5:  Hannah Phillips m. Thomas Russell Lewis
Generation 6:  Hannah Eliza Lewis m. Abijah Franklin Hitchings
Generation 7:  Arthur Treadwell Hitchings m. Florence Etta Hoogerzeil
Generation 8:  Gertrude Matilda Hitchings m. Stanley Elmer Allen (my grandparents)

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, “Surname Saturday ~ CREE of Topsfield, Massachusetts”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted January 27, 2018, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/01/surname-saturday-cree-of-topsfield.html: accessed [access date]). 

Friday, January 26, 2018

2018 New Hampshire Mayflower Memorial Scholarship


The deadline for applications to the 2018 New Hampshire Memorial Mayflower Scholarship is February 15, 2018.   You don’t need to be a member of the Mayflower Society, but members and close relatives of members will receive preference.  It is open to all students, from high school seniors through undergraduate and graduate students.

This is one of the few Mayflower scholarships in the USA awarded to non-members.  Applicants must be able to attend the award ceremony, in person, on May 19, 2018 in Concord, New Hampshire.  It is expected that at least two to four scholarships of $500 to $1000 will be awarded.

Applications and instructions are available at the links below. 

The General Society of Mayflower Descendants (in Plymouth, Massachusetts) also gives an annual $5,000 scholarship to a junior member.  Please send your inquiries to scholarship@themayflowersociety.org  

The website for the NH Mayflower Society:   www.nhmayflower.org

The application form for the 2018 Scholarship:

For more information, please contact:

Dr. Lewis Overaker
NH Mayflower Scholarship Committee
Holderness School
PO Box 1679
Plymouth, New Hampshire  03264

Or find us on Facebook at:



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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "2018 New Hampshire Mayflower Memorial Scholarship", Nutfield Genealogy, posted January 26, 2018, (   https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/01/2018-new-hampshire-mayflower-memorial.html: accessed [access date]). 

Thursday, January 25, 2018

Christmas Books from Santa 2017!

My usual Genealogy Christmas Book post is late because we were in Spain over the holidays, visiting with relatives and seeing the sites where the Rojo ancestors lived and worshipped. But, better late than never!  Here are the books Santa blessed me with this year.


The Genealogies and Estates of Charlestown: In the County of Middlesex and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 1629 - 1818 by Thomas Bellows Wyman, originally published in 1879, this reprint was published by NEHGS in 2016 in two volumes, with a wonderful foreward by Roger Thompson, who has written a book on Charlestown court records. 

I have used this book in libraries, archives and also online (Archive.org) but it's great to have this book on my shelf, especially for writing up the "Surname Saturday" posts I have for my many Charlestown (and Woburn, which is a daughter town) ancestors.  I've already marked up pages and tagged several family sketches for the LARKIN and NEWELL blog posts I've written since Christmas!  This book has a list of early settlers and abstracts of real estate records. 


Making Haste from Babylon:  The Mayflower Pilgrims and Their World, by Nick Bunker, 2011

I heard about this book from some of my fellow travelers on my Mayflower Historic Sites Tour of England and Holland this past autumn.  I wanted to learn more about the origins of the Pilgrims and their life as Separatists (or Brownists) in England and Leyden.  It's written by an English author, not an American.  I haven't read it yet, but I'm looking forward to learning something new.  It was written after Philbrick's Mayflower and Bangs' Strangers and Pilgrims.  


Chronicles of The Pilgrim Fathers of the Colony of Plymouth from 1602 to 1625, by Alexander Young, originally published in 1841, and republished by the New England Historic Genealogical Society in 2016. 

This book is a compilation of documents concerning the early Separatists in England and Leyden, up to the early days of the Plymouth Plantation. The documents are written by William Bradford, Edward Winslow and Robert Cushman.  Some of these documents can be found in other books I already own (Bradford's journal, Cushman's Cry of a Stone, and Winslow's Good News, etc.) 



Cry of a Stone: A Treatise Showing What is Right Matter, Form and Government of the Visible Church of Christ, by Robert Cushman,  first published in 1642 and reprinted in 2016 by the General Society of Mayflower Descendants. 

Here is another book I learned about on my trip to England and Holland, and I had also read about it in the Mayflower Quarterly magazine.  It was written in 1619 in Leyden, before the Mayflower came to New England.  It wasn't published until after Robert Cushman's death, and not recognized as being a Pilgrim book until the 20th century.  I haven't read it yet, but it is always wonderful to read primary source material written by the Pilgrims themselves.  Robert Cushman did not sail on the Mayflower, but arrived in Plymouth on board the Fortune with his son.  I'm looking forward, again, to learning more about the early life of the Separatists. 


The Pilgrim Chronicles:  An Eyewitness History of the Pilgrims and the Founding of Plymouth Colony, by Rod Gragg, 2014

Her is a book Santa found in a used book sale, and it is another compilation of documents about the Pilgrims.  It includes letters and journal accounts from England, Holland and the New World.  I have a feeling that this book duplicates some of the same things in other Pilgrim books I already own, or from the book above, Chronicles of the Pilgrim Fathers.  However, even if it is a duplicate effort, I have to thank Santa for thinking of me and my interest in the subject of the Pilgrims!  


New England Then and Now, by Derek Strahan, 2017

My Genealogy Santa knows I love these kinds of photo books, and I already own several similar books on Boston and other New England cities.  This kind of book shows side by side comparisons of New England scenes, with an antique photo on one side, and a modern photo on the next page. Sometimes the scenes are strikingly similar, and sometimes the scene is glaringly different.  I especially enjoy seeing how street scenes and neighborhoods I know intimately looked 100 years ago.  Thanks, Santa!



New England Rooms, 1639 - 1863, by Samuel Chamberlain and Narcissa G. Chamberlain, originally published 1972, reprinted in 1993. 

Here is another Christmas book bought at a used book sale just for fun!  My genealogy Santa loves to look at architectural books of interiors and exteriors, such as Wallace Nutting's books, and other books of sketches and photographs.  This one has many houses I've toured, which makes it fun, such as Beauport in Gloucester, Massachusetts; The Derby House in Salem, Massachusetts; or the Longfellow House in Cambridge, Massachusetts.  Thanks again, Santa!

Christmas Books 2016:

Christmas Books 2015:

Christmas Books 2014:


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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Christmas Books from Santa 2017!", Nutfield Genealogy, posted January 25, 2018, (   https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/01/christmas-books-from-santa-2017.html: accessed [access date]).

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Weathervane Wednesday ~ Over a Frozen Yogurt Shop

I post another in a series of weather vane photographs every Wednesday.  This started with images of weathervanes from the Londonderry, New Hampshire area, but now I've found interesting weather vanes all across New England and across the globe.  Sometimes my weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are interesting.  Often my readers tip me off to some very unique or unusual weathervanes, too!  If you know a great weather vane near you, let me know if you'd like to have it featured on this blog.

Today's weather vane was photographed in Massachusetts

Do you know the location of weathervane post #347?  Scroll down to find the answer.




This little row boat and rower was photographed in Swampscott, Massachusetts by reader and fellow genealogy blogger June Stearns Butka.  The Oyo Frozen Yogurt shop is located at 136 Humphrey Street, on the corner of Redington Street.  It is right across the street from the beach and Nahant Bay, so the row boat theme is very appropriate.

Oyo Frozen Yogurt website:  http://oyofrozenyogurt.com/

June's blog New England Roots:  http://www.newenglandroots.net/


Click here to see the entire collection of Weathervane Wednesday posts!

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~ Over a Frozen Yogurt Shop", Nutfield Genealogy, posted January 24, 2018, (https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/01/weathervane-wednesday-over-frozen.html: accessed [access date]).

Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Tombstone Tuesday ~ St. Mary the Virgin's churchyard, Henlow, Bedfordshire, England

We toured the churchyard at St. Mary the Virgin's church in Henlow, Bedfordshire in September 2017 as part of the General Society of Mayflower Descendants' Historic Sites Tour.  It is the church where the TILLEY and SAMPSON families of the Mayflower worshiped before going to the New World. It is the only church we visited in England that was affiliated with two Mayflower families. I decided to show you photos of this quaint little churchyard instead of just one particular tombstone for today's blog post.

For a full story on our visit to Henlow,  and for more information on the Tilley and Sampson families of the Mayflower, please see this link:
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/11/along-pilgrim-trail-tilley-and-samson.html 











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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday ~ St. Mary the Virgin's churchyard, Henlow, Bedfordshire, England", Nutfield Genealogy, posted January 23, 2018, (  https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/01/tombstone-tuesday-st-mary-virgins.html: accessed [access date]). 

Saturday, January 20, 2018

Surname Saturday ~ NEWELL of Charlestown, Massachusetts


My 9th great grandfather, John Newell, was probably born in Bristol, England, the son of Andrew Newell and Mary Pitt.  Mary’s father was William Pitt, the sheriff of the city of Bristol.    John Newell removed to Charlestown, Massachusetts where he was a cooper, and was twice town clerk.  I can see his writing in the records of Charlestown, and his signature.  He owned land in Charlestown, which is recorded in some deeds, as well as in his non cupative will where he left some land at “Dirty Marsh” to his wife, Hannah Larkin. 

Middlesex County, MA  Probate File Papers 1648 - 1871 via americanancestors.org   Page 15825: 2

"We whose names are hereunto subscribed being all of us desired
to sit up and watch with Mr. John Newell, Senr. of Charlestowne
in the sd County of Middlesex on Saterday night the fourteenth of
October anno 1704; in sd night sd Mr. John Newell desired
us to draw near to him to hear what he had to say then he declared
unto us that he had not made any will or settlement of his estate
and then did declare unto us and desired us to take notice what
he said and remember that his will was that he did give
to his beloved wife the house he now dwelled in and all his lott
at dirty marsh dureing her natural Life and after his said
wifes decease to his son Joseph and Daughter mary Jointly
and I give unto my wife the money and moveables to her
and her heires forever.  And I give my son John the house
he now posseseth; Why I do not make you the elder son (he said)
John Newwell being there preseent, its because you are a present
possesser but they must stay till it pleas the Lord to take my
wife away which is a great advantage to you Speaking then
to his son John, besides sd he to his son John you owe me
money & promise to pay me which you have not done.  That
garden above I give to my wife if she needs it not after her deceas
I give two thirds to my son John and the other third to my son
Joseph and my daughter Mirrick.  This he said John Newell did
declare several times over distinctly and we according to our
best understanding do declare that he was then of sound and
perfect memory and good understanding.  this our testimoney
we give under our hands concerning the premises aforesaid this
nineteenth day of October in the third year of her Majsties
Reign anno Dominis 1704 - and further he did charge his son
John not to molest his mother but be kind to her and his said
son did then promise by the grace of god that he would do nothing
unbecoming to his mother nor brother nor sister -
                   Witnes our hands
                 William Melody   his mark
                 Hannah Perkins
                        her mark
                 Katherine Ingersoll
Cambridge, Decembr  18. 1704
The above named William Melody, Hannah Perkins
and Katharine Ingerson personally appearing made
oath, that they being present in ?? him of the last
sickness of Mr. John Newell Decr. and being desired by
him to take notice of what he these should say did
hear him the sd John Newell publish and declare
the above written Testimony Words, and they
caused the same to be put into writing and subscrib
ed the same as witnesses

                        Jon Cod     J. Leverett   J. Rob

Newell the Eldest son presented
above written noncuparative Will
was present together with the wife of Joseph Newell
Mary Mirrick ye Daughter of ye dec'ed ye witnessess was sworn
att. Leverett"

I descend from John’s daughter, Mary Mirick, mentioned in the will above.  Mary Newell, my 8th great grandmother, married Isaac Mirick of Newbury in 1694.  His father was also from Bristol, and Isaac was a sea captain who became a ship builder upon his retirement. 

Some NEWELL resources:

The Genealogies and Estates of Charlestown in the County of Middlesex and Commonwealth of Massachusetts 1629 – 1818, by Thomas Bellows Wyman, 2016 (originally published 1879), Volume 2, page 698.

Middlesex County, Massachusetts Probate File Papers 1648 – 1871 accessed at www.americanancestors.org

Charlestown, Massachusetts Vital Records

My NEWELL genealogy:

Generation 1:  John Newell, son of Andrew Newell and Mary Pitt, born about August 1634 probably in Bristol, England, died 14 October 1704 in Charlestown, Massachusetts; married on 15 February 1664/5 in Charlestown to Hannah Larkin, daughter of Edward Larkin and Joanna Unknown.  Five children.

Generation 2:  Mary Newell, born about 1669, died 11 March 1710 in Newbury, Massachusetts; married on 22 August 1694 to Isaac Mirick, son of James Mirick and Margery Unknown.  He was born 6 January 1665 and died 1731 in Newbury.  Seven children born in Charlestown.

Generation 3:  Hannah Mirick m. Thomas Jillings
Generation 4:  Hannah Jillings m. Daniel Glover
Generation 5:  Tabitha Glover m. Thomas Homan
Generation 6:  Betsey Jillings Homan m. Jabez Treadwell
Generation 7:  Eliza Ann Treadwell m. Abijah Hitchings
Generation 8:  Arthur Treadwell Hitchings m. Florence Etta Hoogerzeil
Generation 9:  Gertrude Matilda Hitchings m. Stanley Elmer Allen (my grandparents)

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, “Surname Saturday ~ NEWELL of Charlestown, Massachusetts”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted January 20, 2018, (https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/01/surname-saturday-newell-of-charlestown.html: accessed [access date]).