Saturday, June 30, 2018

Surname Saturday ~ MAYO of Cape Cod and Boston, Massachusetts



Reverend John Mayo was probably from Oxfordshire, England, and little is known of his background or parentage.  In 1615, at age 17 he matriculated at Oxford University, at Magdalen College.   As a “non-conformist” he never received his degree, and came with his wife and five children to New England around 1640.  He became the teacher at the church in Barnstable where my other ancestor, Rev. Joseph Hull was the pastor. He briefly considered joining Gov. George Wyllys’ colony in Connecticut in 1643, but declined the offer.  Then he removed to Eastham around 1644 to be the minister at the new church.  He remained there until 1655 when he was called to Boston to be the new pastor of the new Second Church (also known as the Old North or Paul Revere church).

John Mayo was installed as the first minister of the Second Church on 9 November 1655.  He served as an overseer for Harvard College, and as a chaplain for the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company, and for the General Court of Massachusetts. Mayo lived in a large brick house on Hanover Street that was later the home of Cotton Mather.  Already aged, he served as the pastor in Boston until 1673 when his associate minister, Increase Mather, took over his position. There are many entries in Mather’s diaries about Mr. Mayo. 

After his retirement, Rev. John Mayo removed back to Barnstable where he lived near his children and grandchildren.  He had founded two towns (Barnstable and Eastham) and three churches (Barnstable, Eastham and Boston’s Second Church).  He died without a will.  Samuel Eliot Morison wrote of Rev. John Mayo "I always supposed that Mayo was quite a person, but not a really outstanding one like Increase Mather.  But I dare say he has not had justice from the historians - quiet people of good character who mind their own business seldom do."

I descend from Reverend Mayo’s eldest son, Samuel Mayo (about 1620 – 1663) who was a mariner in Boston and Cape Cod.  He also was ordained as a “teaching elder” on 15 April 1640. Samuel became Master of his most important ship, the bark Desire, in 1650.  The Desire was the third vessel built in Massachusetts, (1636 in Marblehead) and it ran between Barnstable and Boston.   He died in Boston in 1663, leaving nine children. His estate was settled on 26 April 1664. I descend from his daughter Mary, who married Jonathan Bangs in 1664.

Rev. Mayo's son Nathaniel married Hannah Prence in 1650.  She was a granddaughter of Elder William Brewster of the Mayflower.  Thus the General Society of Mayflower Descendants has preserved her lineage in their books, archives and library, including that of Rev. Mayo.  

Some MAYO resources:

Several articles in the NEHGR, Volume 95, pages 39 – 49, and also pages 100 – 108, and Volume 103, pages 32 – 42

Mayflower Families Through Five Generations, William Brewster, GSMD, 2015, pages 147 - 162
The Winthrop Papers, Volume 4, page 262

My MAYO lineage:

Generation 1:  Rev. John Mayo, b. probably Oxfordshire, died 3 May 1676 in Yarmouth, Massachusetts; married Thomasine Unknown.  She died 26 February 1682 in Yarmouth.  Eight children.

Generation 2: Samuel Mayo, born about 1620 in England, died about 1663, married to Thomasine Lumpkin, daughter of William Lumpkin and his wife Thomasine.  She died 16 January 1709 in Eastham or Harwich, Massachusetts.  Nine children.

Generation 3:  Mary Mayo, born about 1645 in Barnstable, died 26 January 1711 in Brewster, Massachusetts; married on 16 July 1664 in Eastham to Jonathan Bangs, son of Edward Bangs and Rebecca Hobart.  He was born 16 July 1644 in Plymouth, Massachusetts and died 9 November 1728 in Brewster.  Twelve children.

Generation 4:  Hannah Bangs m. John Crosby
Generation 5:  Jonathan Crosby m. Hannah Hamblin
Generation 6:  Ebenezer Crosby m. Elizabeth Robinson
Generation 7:  Rebecca Crosby m. Comfort Haley
Generation 8:  Joseph Edwin Healy m. Matilda Weston
Generation 9:  Mary Etta Healey m. Peter Hoogerzeil
Generation 10:  Florence Etta Hoogerzeil m. Arthur Treadwell Hitchings
Generation 11:  Gertrude Matilda Hitchings m. Stanley Elmer Allen (my grandparents)

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, “Surname Saturday ~  MAYO of Cape Cod and Boston, Massachusetts”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted June 30, 2018, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/06/surname-saturday-mayo-of-cape-cod-and.html: accessed [access date]). 

Thursday, June 28, 2018

July 2018 Genealogy and Local History Event Calendar


For last minute updates, see the “Nutfield Genealogy” Facebook page at this link:  https://www.facebook.com/nutfield.gen/    Please send new events to me by commenting here at the end of this post, or email vrojomit@gmail.com  

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June 27 – July 1, St. Peter’s Fiesta, in the city of Gloucester, Massachusetts.  A five day festival in honor of the patron saint of fishermen, St. Peter.  Parades, carnival, concerts, boat races, greasy pole contest and a blessing of the fleet in celebration of the Italian and Portuguese heritage of the city.

July FREE Fun Fridays – sponsored by the Highland Street Foundation. For a full listing see http://www.highlandstreet.org/programs/free-fun-fridays

July 6          Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, MA
                   Cape Cod Maritime Museum in Hyannis, MA
                   Battleship Cove in Fall River, MA
                   Hancock Shaker Village in Pittsfield, MA
                   Pilgrim Hall Museum in Plymouth, MA
                   New England Quilt Museum in Lowell, MA
July 13th      Larz Anderson Auto Museum in Brookline, MA
                   The Telephone Museum in Waltham, MA
                   Venfort Hall, Gilded Age Museum in Lennox, MA
July 20th      Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, MA
                   New Bedford Whaling Museum in New Bedford, MA
                   Spellman Museum of Stamps & Postal History, Weston MA
July 27th      JFK Hyannis Museum in Hyannis, MA
                   Old Colony History Museum in Taunton, MA
                   Boston Athenaeum in Boston, MA

July 1, Sunday, 9am – 2pm, Carriagetown Car Show – Carriage Museum Display, at the Amesbury Carriage Museum, 5 Market Square, Amesbury, Massachusetts.  Amesbury made carriages and automobile bodies will be on display in the Market Square.  Downtown Amesbury will be filled with classic cars, antiques, hot rods and rat rods.  Many food vendors and stores will be open.  Donations benefit the Carriage Museum and Amesbury Days. Rain date, July 8th.

July 1, Sunday, 10am – 5pm, Timeline of American History, at the Strawbery Banke Museum, 14 Hancock Street, Portsmouth, New Hampshire.  Included with regular admission, three will be special living history displays and reenactors showcasing American history from the 1600s to the 1900s. 

July 1, Sunday, at 1pm and 3pm, The British Redcoat, at the Minute Man National Park Visitor Center, 174 Liberty Street, Concord, Massachusetts. Free to the public.  Join Park Ranger Roger Fuller to explore why the Regulars were in Massachusetts, why they came to Concord, and what happened on April 19, 1775 from the perspective of the King’s Army.

July 3, Tuesday, 8:30pm, The Boston POPS Spectacular, at the historic Hatch Shell on the Esplanade, Boston, Massachusetts. This is the complete concert without the fireworks. Free event, first come first serve, but not as crowded as the concert on July 4th.

July 3 and 4, The Bristol Fourth of July, held in Bristol, Rhode Island.  This is the longest running and longest Forth of July parade – with a concert series, beauty pagent, carnival, parade, drum and bugle corps competition and fireworks.  https://fourthofjulybristolri.com/

July 4, Wednesday, New Boston 4th of July Celebration, at New Boston, New Hampshire. http://www.newboston4thofjuly.org/   10am parade with the firing of the Revolutionary War era Molly Stark Cannon, and activities all day until the 9:15 fireworks.

July 4, Wednesday, 9am, City of Boston Official Independence Day Commemoration (Flag Raising and Parade).  From City Hall Plaza to the Old State House in Boston, Massachusetts.

July 4, Wednesday, 10am – 5pm, An American Celebration, at Strawbery Banke Museum, 14 Hancock Street, Portsmouth, New Hampshire.  Free admission thanks to BAE Systems.  US Naturalization Ceremony at 11am, Old Fashioned Field Day 10am – 2pm, Parade at 2pm. 

July 4, Wednesday, 10am, Reading of the Declaration of Independence, at balcony of the Old State House, Boston, Massachusetts.  Will be read by the current captain commanding of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company, just as it was read to the citizens of Boston on July 18, 1776. Free to the public.

July 4, Wednesday, 1pm, The Declaration of Independence, at the North Bridge, Concord, Massachusetts.  Join the National Park Rangers and volunteers as they read the Declaration of Independence.  Free. 

July 4, Wednesday 2 – 6pm, Celebrate Independence Day, at the Adams National Historical Park, 1250 Hancock Street, Quincy, Massachusetts. 4pm A stage play celebrating John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and Abigail Adams. 3:30 A reading of the Declaration of Independence. 2pm A recreation of the Continental Congress. Free and open to the public. Family friendly.  A free trolley from the Adams National Historical Park Visitor Center will be available.

July 3, Tuesday, 8:30pm, The Boston POPS Fireworks Spectacular, at the historic Hatch Shell on the Esplanade, Boston, Massachusetts. This is the complete concert with all the fireworks. Free event, first come first serve (opens to the public at 9am), and this event will be televised.

July 5, Thursday, noon, Lunch and Learn:  Lessons from Living History- Finding Meaning in the Past and Fostering Empathy in the Present, at Plimoth Plantation, 137 Warren Avenue, Plymouth, Massachusetts. Bring a lunch or buy one in the café. $8 non-members. Presented by public historian Hilary Goodnow. http://www.plimoth.org/learn/programs-adults

July 6, Friday, noon, First Friday Lecture:  Prince Edward Island Repositories and Records, at the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 99 – 1010 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts. Free to the public.  This session will focus on Irish immigrants and the records they left behind.

July 6, Friday, 3pm, A Visit with Queen Victoria, at the Meredith Bay Colony Club, 21 Upper Mile Point Drive, Meredith, New Hampshire.  Presented by living historian Sally Mummey in proper 19th century clothing. Free to the public.

July 6, Friday, 7pm, Songs of Emigration:  Storytelling through Traditional Irish Music, at the Chichester Grange/Town Hall, 54 Main Street, Chichester, New Hampshire.  Presented by musician Jordan Tirrell-Wysocki on fiddle and guitar. Free to the public.  Hosted by the Chichester Town Library.

July 7, Saturday, 10am,  Jill Morelli, Certified Genealogist:  “Finding Dirk: Insanity in the 19th Century”, will speak for the Falmouth Genealogical Society in Falmouth, Massachusetts.  At the Falmouth Public Library, 300 Main Street, Falmouth, Massachusetts.

July 7, Saturday, History Camp Boston, at Suffolk University Law School, Boston, Massachusetts.  and History Camp Weekend http://historycamp.org/boston 

July 7, Saturday, 10am, New Visitor Tour of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts. Free orientation and tour.  No need to be a member.  Tour attendees are welcome to stay and use the archive after the tour.  No registration necessary.

July 7, Saturday, 10am – 5pm, Summer Encampment at Fort Sewell, Marblehead, Massachusetts, hosted by Glover’s Marblehead Regiment. This is an 18th century encampment with sutlers, crafts, 18th century medicine, music and sea chanteys.  There will be skirmishes between the colonial rebels and the forces of the Crown. Family Friendly.

July 7, Saturday, 10:30am, "Black Suitcase Mystery: A World War II Remembrance" by Gail Downs, presented by the author at the Manchester Historic Association's Millyard Museum, 200 Bedford Street, Manchester, New Hampshire. Free with admission.  This book tells the story of George Elliott Rich, who was sent to live with his grandparents in New Hampshire in 1930.  The mother and son communicated only by cards and letters.  In 1942 George was killed over German occupied Poland on his 50th mission with the Army Air Corps.  The author possessed all the letters his mother saved, and used them to acquaint her fifth grade class with genealogy research, American History and it developed into a four year study.  Books will be available for purchase. 

July 8, Sunday, The New England Historic Genealogical Society and the Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Boston Open House, at 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts. Learn about resources and services from the staff, special discounts on memberships and merchandise, raffle, family history themed games and activities.  On Open Newbury Day the street will be closed to vehicular traffic so pedestrians can roam.  No registration is necessary.

July 8, Sunday, 1:30pm, Authoring a Nation:  A Hawthorne Neighborhood Walking Tour, at the Wayside in Concord, Massachusetts.  Explore the neighborhood where Nathaniel Hawthorne, Louisa May Alcott, Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau lived and worked. Free.  Led by rangers from the Minute Man National Park. 

July 10, Tuesday, 10am (every Tuesday this summer) Tales of New Hampshire Family Story Time, at the New Hampshire Historical Society, 30 Park Street, Concord, New Hampshire. A free program for the whole family.

July 10, Tuesday, 1pm, Dick Eastman Genealogy Lecture, at 41 Cochituate Road, Wayland, Massachusetts.  This is Dick Eastman’s seventh lecture in Wayland for the Wayland council on Aging.

July 10, Tuesday, 7pm, A Tribute To Sarah Josepha Hale, at the Old Town Hall Museum, 310 Main Street, Salem, New Hampshire.  Presented by living historian Sharon Wood, and sponsored by the Salem Historical Society.  Free to the public. Light refreshments.

July 11, Wednesday, noon, Using AmericanAncestors.org, at NEHGS, 99 -101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts.  Free to the public.  Learn what online resources exist, how to navigate the website, perform database searches, browse collections online, and more.

July 11, Wednesday, noon, Federalism, Religion & New England Women Writers, at the Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts. A Brown Bag Lunch program to allow MHS research fellows to present and discuss their work.  Free to the public, bring lunch.  No registration required.

July 11, Wednesday, 6:30pm, Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn: The Connected Farm Buildings of New England, at the Bennington Historical Society, 38 Main Street, Bennington, New Hampshire.  Presented by author Thomas Hubka.  Free to the public.

July 11, Wednesday, 7:30 pm, New Hampshire on High:  Historic and Unusual Weathervanes of the Granite State, at the Holderness Historical Society, Rout 3 (Curry Place), Holderness, New Hampshire. Presented by author Glenn Knoblock.  Free to the public.

July 12, Thursday, 6pm, Book Talk:  Maine Roads to Gettysburg, at the Maine Historical Society, 489 Congress Street, Portland, Maine.  Author Tom Huntington discusses soldiers from Maine at the Battle of Gettysburg, and his new book.  Free for members, $5 general admission.

July 12, Thursday, 6:30pm, Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn: The Connected Farm Buildings of New England, at Auburn Historical Association, 102 Hooksett Road, Auburn, New Hampshire.  Presented by author Thomas Hubka.  Free to the public.

July 12, Thursday, 7:15, New England Quilts and the Stories They Tell, at the Madison Historical Society, 19 East Madison Road, Madison, New Hampshire.  Presented by quilt expert Pam Weeks.  Participants may bring one quilt for identification or story telling. Free to the public.

July 13, Friday, noon, Phyllis Wheatley & the Science of the Human, 1761 – 1800, at the Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts. The Brown Bag Lunch programs allow MHS research fellows to present and discuss their work.  Free to the public.  Bring a lunch.  No registration required.

July 14, Saturday, 10am – 4pm, 28th Annual American Independence Festival, hosted by the American Independence Museum, 1 Governor’s Lane, Exeter, New Hampshire. Battle re-enactments, colonial artisans, children’s activities, cannon firings, crafts, music, food and more.  Check out the website for more information:  https://www.independencemuseum.org/american-independence-festival/

July 14 and 15, Saturday and Sunday, 10am – 5pm, 19th Annual Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum Powwow, at the Mt. Karsarge Indian Museum, 18 Highlawn Road, Warner, New Hampshire.  Singing, dancing, vendors, food. Saturday night Eastern Social Dancing with James Moreis.  On site camping available.

July 16, Monday, 7pm, World War II in New Hampshire, at the Northfield Town Hall, 21 Summer Street, Northfield, New Hampshire.  Hosted by the Northfield Historical Society.  Presented by John Gfoerer, a new documentary that chronicles how the nation and the state of New Hampshire mobilized for war. Free to the public.

July 17, Tuesday, 6:30pm, New England Quilts and the Stories They Tell, at the Gilford Public Library 31 Potter Hill Road, Gilford, New Hampshire.  Presented by quilt expert Pam Weeks.  Participants may bring one quilt for identification or story telling. Free to the public.

July 17, Tuesday, 7pm, Robert Rogers of the Rangers, at the Moultonborough Public Library, 4 Holland Street, Moultonborough, New Hampshire.  Presented by George Morrison.  Free to the public.

July 18, Wednesday, 4pm – 5:30pm, World War Women: The Unsung Heroines of WWII, at the Foxborough Council of Aging, 75 Central Street, Foxborough, Massachusetts. A theatrical performance presented by History at Play. Suitable for ages 13 and up. Running time approximately 75 minutes.

July 18, Wednesday, 7pm, Stories, Stones & Superstitions of New Hampshire, at the Newton Town Hall, 2 Town Hall Road, Newton, New Hampshire.  Author Roxie Zwicker will give a virtual tour of New Hampshire’s most curious burial grounds.  Free to the public.

July 19, Thursday, 6:30pm, Colonial Stories:  The Tangled Lives of Native Americans and English Settlers, at the Meredith Public Library, 91 Main Street, Meredith, New Hampshire.  Presented by storyteller/historian Jo Radner.  Free to the public.

July 19, Thursday, 7pm, New England Quilts and the Stories They Tell, at the 3rd Congregational Church, 14 River Road, Alstead, New Hampshire. Sponsored by the Alstead Historical Society. Presented by quilt expert Pam Weeks.  Participants may bring one quilt for identification or story telling. Free to the public.

July 20, Friday, 6pm, New England Lighthouses and the People Who Kept Them, at the Deerfield Town Hall, 6 Church Street, Deerfield, New Hampshire.  Sponsored by the Philbrick-James Library.  Presented by author Jeremy D’Entremont.  Free to the public.

July 21, Saturday, 9am (also August 11, September 15 and October 8) John Adams, Esq. Is Open for Business, at the Adams National Historical Park, 1250 Hancock Street, Quincy, Massachusetts.   Micheal lepage will portray John Adams while touring the Adams National Historic Park as part of the guided tour.  Family Friendly.  Free to the public.

July 21, Saturday, Historic Homes and Summer Gardens Tour, in Hancock, New Hampshire.  Tour six distinctive homes and six gardens in this classic New Hampshire village. https://www.hancockwomansclub.org/ 

July 21, Saturday, 9am – 9:30pm, 25th Annual Glasgow Lands Scottish Festival, at 300 North Main Street, Florence, Massachusetts.  Pipe and drum competition, dance competition, haggis tasting, athletic competitions, and so much more! Admission fees apply.

July 21, Saturday, 10am, New Visitor Tour of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts. Free orientation and tour of the research facility.  No need to be a member.  Tour attendees are welcome to stay after the tour and use the library.  No registration is necessary.

July 21, Saturday, 10am to noon, Walking Tour:  The Victorian North End, meet up at the Goodwin Funeral Home parking lot (607 Chestnut Street, corner of Harrison Street, Manchester, New Hampshire).  Sponsored by the Manchester Historic Association.  $5 members, $10 general public.  See the North End’s elegant Straw mansion, the fairgrounds, trotting park and the site of Webster General Hospital with local historians Dick Duckoff and Matt Labbe.

July 21, Saturday, 1pm, Rendezvous with Rachel Revere, at the Paul Revere House, 19 North Square, Boston, Massachusetts.  A theatrical performance about the wife of Paul Revere, hosted by History at play.  Kid Friendly.

July 21, Saturday, at 1:30pm and 3pm, Town Meeting:  Let Your Voice Be Heard!  At the North Bridge, Concord, Massachusetts.  Debate the revolutionary issues with Concord residents of 1774 (portrayed by the Guild of Historic Interpreters).  You are encouraged to take part and let your voice be heard!  Free to the public.

July 21 and 22, Saturday and Sunday, 10:30am - 4pm,  A Victorian Summer on Bakers Island, hosted by the Essex National Heritage Area and Commonwealth Vintage Dancers.  A first ever living history event on Bakers Island to recreat a sense of what life was like during the days of the Winne-Egan Hotel in the late 19th century. Meet Victorian dressed interpreters, play croquet, enjoy the views, and learn the history of the island.  This encampment will take place at the Light Station. Tickets to get on the ferry to the island can be purchased at https://essexheritage.org/boat  Family friendly.  Free with boat ticket. 

July 24, Tuesday, 6:30 pm, New Hampshire on High:  Historic and Unusual Weathervanes of the Granite State, at the Meredith Public Library, 91 Main Street, Meredith, New Hampshire. Presented by author Glenn Knoblock.  Free to the public.

July 24, Tuesday, 7pm, The Catholic Church Database and the Archdiocese Digitization Project, at the American Legion Post #129, 22 Elms Street, Gardner, Massachusetts. Hosted by the Central Massachusetts Genealogical Society, Inc. Presented by Rachel Adams, the database services volunteer coordinator for the New England Historic Genealogical Society.  

July 25, Wednesday, 6pm, Analyzing an Early American Family Tree: the Phippen Genealogical Chart of 1808, at the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 99 – 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts. Presented by Richard C. Fipphen.  Free to the public. 

July 25, Wednesday, 7pm, Indian Wars of New England, at the Old Cheshire County Court House, 33 Winter Street, Keene, New Hampshire.  Hosted by the Horatio Colony House Museum.  Presented by author Michael Tougias.  This program is held in conjunction with an exhibit titled “Two Sides of the Coin: Native American and European Settler’s Approach to Land and Resources” through October 14th at the Horatio Colony House Museum.  Free to the public.

July 25, Wednesday, 7pm, Songs of Emigration:  Storytelling Through Traditional Music, at the Quincy Bog Nature Center, 131 Quincy Bog Road, Rumney, New Hampshire. Presented by musician Jordon Tirrell-Wysocki on his fiddle and guitar.  Free to the public.  Hosted by the Quincy Bog Natural Area.

July 26, Thursday, 7pm, A Visit with Queen Victoria, at the Mary E. Bartlett Memorial Library, 22 Dalton Road, Brentwood, New Hampshire.  Presented by living historian Sally Mummey in proper 19th century clothing. Free to the public.

July 27 – 29, Friday to Sunday, Annual LHA International Timeline, at the Dover Forge Restaurant, 183 Route 100, West Dover, Vermont.  https://www.facebook.com/events/227192157848665/

July 27 and 28, Felton Family Reunion, at the Nathaniel Felton Homesteads, on Felton Road in Peabody, Massachusetts.  See the website www.feltonfamily.org for more information and the schedule of events.

July 27, Friday, noon, Albery Allson Whitman and the Place of Poetry, at the Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts. The Brown Bag Lunch Programs allow MHS research fellows to present and discuss their work.  Programs are free and open to the public.  Bring a lunch and no registration is required.

July 28 and 29, World War I Living History Weekend, at Fort Devens, 94 Jackson Road, Devens, Massachusetts. Saturday 10am – 5pm, Sunday 10am – 3pm, suggested donation $5/$10.  Guided tours of Devens with a focus on WWI sites, and the museum will be open, too.


July 29, Sunday, at 1pm and 3pm, The British Redcoat, at the Minute Man National Park Visitor Center, 174 Liberty Street, Concord, Massachusetts. Free to the public.  Join Park Ranger Roger Fuller to explore why the Regulars were in Massachusetts, why they came to Concord, and what happened on April 19, 1775 from the perspective of the King’s Army.

August 1, Wednesday, noon, Partisanship & the Origins of the American Revolution in NYC, at the Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts. The Brown Bag Lunch program allows MHS research fellows to present and discuss their work.  Free to the public, bring a lunch.  No registration required.

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Future Events:

 August 10 and 11, Friday and Saturday, Celtic Connections Conference: Pathways to Our Past, in Auburndale, Massachusetts.  Delve into your Irish ancestry by attending lectures presented by internationally recognized speakers. Lecture topics include Irish, Scots Irish, Scottish and Welsh genealogy, culture, DNA.  http://celtic-connections.org/

August 14 – 16 Scots Irish Reunion:  Bringing the Ulster Diaspora To Life, at Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine. Hosted by the St. Andrews Society of Maine and the Maine Ulster Scots Project. Visit www.maineulsterscots.com for more information.

 13 September, Thursday – Saturday, The 2018 New York State Family History Conference, at Tarrytown, New York.  More information coming soon. 



September 22, Saturday, 8am – 4pm – The Fall Conference of the American Canadian Genealogical Society, to be held at the ACGS, 4 Elm Street, Manchester, New Hampshire.  Annual meeting, raffles, three speakers – David Vermette, Pierre Gendreau Hetu, and Robert Perrault.


September 28 – 30, Old Planters Reunion, at Historic Beverly, 117 Cabot Street, Beverly, Massachusetts.  Save the date!  More information soon!
September 29, Saturday, 9am – 1pm, Family Research Day – Mini Conference, at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 400 Essex Street, Lynnfield, Massachusetts.  12 different presentations in four tracks:  Beginning Research, Technology, DNA and Records. More information coming soon.

April 3-6, 2019,  New England Regional Genealogical Conference NERGC in Manchester, New Hampshire at the Radisson Hotel on Elm Street.  http://www.nergc.org/2019-conference/ for more information.


August 10 – 16, 2019, Founders, Fishermen and Family History Cruise, On Holland America’s ms Zaandam, departing Boston on August 10 for a 7 night trip to Canada, ports include Montreal, Quebec City, the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Charlottetown (Prince Edward Island), Sydney, Halifax, Bar Harbor, and Boston, Massachusetts. Speakers include the genealogists Gena Philibert-Ortega, Tami Osmer Mize, and David Allen Lambert. See the website for more information: http://www.oconnelltravel.com/rw/view/38994   

Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Weathervane Wednesday ~ A Ship Over City Hall

I post another in a series of weather vane photographs every Wednesday.  This started with images of weathervanes from the Londonderry, New Hampshire area, but now I've found interesting weather vanes all across New England and across the globe.  Sometimes my weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are interesting.  Often my readers tip me off to some very unique or unusual weathervanes, too!  If you know a great weather vane near you, let me know if you'd like to have it featured on this blog.

Today's weather vane was photographed in Maine.

Do you know the location of weathervane post #369?  Scroll down to find the answer.



This three dimensional ship weathervane is located above the city hall in Bath, Maine.  This finely detailed four masted ship is evocative of the ship building industry which made Bath famous for the last four hundred years.  The first ship built in New England was built in 1608 nearby in Popham Beach, and the industry continues today at the Bath Iron Works.

The Davenport Memorial Building was built in 1929.  It is named for Charles, the father of George Patten Davenport,  two men who were both born in the home formerly located at this spot.  Charles was an alderman, and George became one of Bath's wealthiest citizens.  He donated the building, and left a trust of $1,500,000 for the Davenport foundation.

Below the weathervane is a Paul Revere bell cast in 1802.  This bell is rung on the Fourth of July and Patriot's Day.   Before the Davenport Memorial Building was constructed, the bell hung in the previous town hall and in two churches in Bath.


City of Bath website:  http://www.cityofbath.com/

Click here to see ALL the "Weathervane Wednesday" posts:

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday~ A Ship Over City Hall", Nutfield Genealogy, posted June 27, 2018, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/06/weathervane-wednesday-ship-over-city.html: accessed [access date]).  

Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Tombstone Tuesday ~ The infant Benjamin Allcock, died 1720/21, Portsmouth, New Hampshire


This tombstone was photographed at the Point of Graves in Portsmouth, New Hampshire



Benjamin Son
Of Mr. Joseph
& Mrs Keturah
Allcock, Aged
5 Months & 23 Ds
Decd. Febry 28, 1720

Joseph, son of John Alcock and Joanna Amerdith, born 1691 in Kittery, Maine and died February 1745 in Portsmouth, New Hampshire; married  Keturah Allcock, daughter of Benjamin Rawlins and Eunice Unknown. 

Two children:
1.  Joseph born 26 February 1716 in Portsmouth m. Jane Ring
2.  Benjamin born September 1719, died 28 February 1720/21

There are two embroidered pictures attributed to Keturah Rawlins in American museums.  The first is a linen panel of an embroidered shepherdess in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.  See this link:  https://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/39.108.1/   The second is also at the MET museum, and is a hunting scene https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/13742  Both embroidered scenes are circa 1740 made in Boston, Massachusetts.

This very elaborately carved gravestone for an infant, and the elegant schoolgirl embroideries lead me to believe that the Allcock and Rawlins families were very wealthy.

Sue Straw has a website dedicated to the children buried at the Point of Graves in Portsmouth.  Here is a link to her sketch on Benjamin Allcock:
http://ancestorspeak.org/benjamin-allcock/ 


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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday ~ The infant Benjamin Allcock, died 1720/21, Portsmouth, New Hampshire", Nutfield Genealogy, posted June 26, 2018, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/06/tombstone-tuesday-infant-benjamin.html: accessed [access date]). 

Saturday, June 23, 2018

Surname Saturday ~ BANGS of Plymouth and Eastham, Massachusetts

Capt. Jonathan Bangs, Ancient Burial Ground,
Brewster, Massachusetts on Cape Cod


The third ship to arrive in Plymouth Colony, after the Mayflower and the Fortune, was the Anne in 1623.  My 9th great grandfather, Edward Bangs (1591 – 1678) was on board the Anne, and he received four acres of land.  In the 1627 Plymouth division of cattle, Edward Bangs was the 13th person in the 12th company list.  He was a freeman in 1633.   In 1635 he was on the staff of Governor Bradford of the Plymouth Colony, and is listed along with Captain Myles Standish (another one of my ancestors),  Thomas Prence, John Howland (also my ancestor), John Alden and Stephen Hopkins.

 By 1645 Edward Bangs had removed to Eastham, further out on Cape Cod. He was an innkeeper, and called “yeoman” in records.  In 1657 he became licensed as a merchant in Eastham, and was engaged in trade.  I descend from his youngest son, Jonathan Bangs (1644 – 1728) who was born in Plymouth and lived on his father’s farm in Eastham, and later in Harwich.  He was Captain of the local militia, a farmer and a member of the legislator.  Jonathan’s gravestone (see the photo above) names him as Captain.  His two older brothers left on descendants, but Jonathan had three wives and twelve children.

My 7th great grandmother was Hannah Bangs (1676 – 1715).  She married John Crosby of Harwich and had six children.  This was the last generation in this lineage to live on Cape Cod, because her oldest son, my 6th great grandfather, Jonathan Crosby, removed to Yarmouth, Nova Scotia.

For more information on the BANGS family:

Dawes-Gates Ancestral Lines, by Mary Walton Ferris

The Great Migration Begins, by Robert Charles Anderson, Volume 1

The History and Genealogy of the Bangs Family in America, by Dean Dudley

My BANGS genealogy:

Generation 1:  Edward Bangs, son of John Bangs and Jane Chavis, born 28 October 1591 in Panfield, Braintree, Essex, England, died 16 Feb 1678 in Eastham, Massachusetts; married first about 1633 to Lydia Hicks, daughter of Robert Hicks, one children.  Married second before 1636 in Eastham, Massachusetts to Rebecca, possibly the daughter of Edmund Hobart and Margaret Dewey, mother of 8 more Bangs children. 

Generation 2:  Jonathan Bangs , born 16 July 1644 in Plymouth, Massachusetts, died 9 November 1728 in Brewster, Massachusetts; married first on 16 July 1664 in Eastham to Mary Mayo, daughter of Samuel May and Thomasine Lumpkin, mother of 12 children. Married second to Sarah Unknown, and married third in 1720 to Ruth Cole, widow of John Young.

Generation 3:  Hannah Bangs, born 14 March 1676 in Eastham, died 1715; married about 1703 to John Crosby, son of Thomas Crosby and Sarah Unknown.  He was born 4 December 1670 in Eastham, died 25 May 1717 in Harwich, Massachusetts.  Six children.

Generation 4:  Jonathan Crosby m. Hannah Hamblin
Generation 5:  Ebenezer Crosby m. Elizabeth Robinson
Generation 6:  Rebecca Crosby m. Comfort Haley
Generation 7:  Joseph Edwin Healy m. Matilda Weston
Generation 8:  Mary Etta Healey m. Peter Hoogerzeil
Generation 9:  Florence Etta Hoogerzeil m. Arthur Treadwell Hitchings
Generation 10.  Gertrude Matilda Hitchings m. Stanley Elmer Allen (my grandparents)

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, “Surname Saturday ~ BANGS of Eastham and Plymouth, Massachusetts”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted June 23, 2018, (  https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/06/surname-saturday-bangs-of-plymouth-and.html: accessed [access date]). 

Wednesday, June 20, 2018

Weathervane Wednesday ~ Above a Fishing Shack in Maine

I post another in a series of weather vane photographs every Wednesday.  This started with images of weathervanes from the Londonderry, New Hampshire area, but now I've found interesting weather vanes all across New England and across the globe.  Sometimes my weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are interesting.  Often my readers tip me off to some very unique or unusual weathervanes, too!  If you know a great weather vane near you, let me know if you'd like to have it featured on this blog.

Today's weather vane was photographed in Maine.

Do you know the location of weathervane post #368?  Scroll down to find the answer.





This little fishing shack is located in Popham Beach, Maine.  It's so close to the road you can reach out and touch it as you drive by (the third photo above was taken from the driver's side window).    The three dimensional fish weathervane above the shack's cupola is very similar to the fish weathervanes seen down the street above the Popham Chapel and the Popham Chapel house.  Click HERE and  HERE to see those weathervanes and compare for yourself!

This shack is located a few hundred yards from the marker for the Popham Colony.  This colonial settlement was founded in 1607 and abandoned a year later.  The first ship built by the English in the New World was built at that time, and sailed back to England.  This ship was the Virginia of Sagadahoc.  You can see a replica in nearby Phippsburg, Maine.  This site was rediscovered by an archaeological dig that continued from 1994 to 2005. A historical marker was installed on the waterfront near this fishing shack.

Click here to see ALLof  the past 368 "Weathervane Wednesday" posts:

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday~  Above a Fishing Shack in Maine", Nutfield Genealogy, posted June 20, 2018, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/06/weathervane-wednesday-above-fishing.html: accessed [access date]). 

Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Two Lyford Children buried at Pittsfield, New Hampshire

This tombstone was photographed at The Old Meeting House Cemetery in Pittsfield, New Hampshire


    NANCY                                           JEREMIAH
Daughter of                                          Son of    
Dudley &                                           Dudley &
Nancy Lyford                                  Nancy Lyford
died                                                died
Feb. 17, 1840                                  Apri 6, 1815
aged 17 yrs.                                      AE. 7 yrs




Dudley Lyford, son of Dudley Lyford and Sarah Cram, was born 12 August 1775 in Pittsfield, New Hampshire, and died there on 4 December 1840.  His original name was Oliver, but his father died when he was only three years old and his mother named him Dudley after his father.   He married Nancy Green about 1814 in Pittsfield.  She was born 15 November 1783 in Pittsfield.  Dudley was a tanner, and was a Colonel in the 18th Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 1st Division of the New Hampshire Militia (men from Nottingham, Deerfield, Epsom, Northwood and Pittsfield, New Hampshire). 

They had 10 children:
1.  Eliza Blake, b. 1803 m. James McCrillis
2.  Oliver Smith, b. 1805
3.  Jeremiah Green, b. 1808 d. 1815
4.  Sarah Fogg, b. 1810 m. Jeremiah Cross
5.   Mehitable, b. 1812 d. 1813
6.   John Cram, b. 1814
7.  Mehitable Green, b. 1816 m. Daniel Babb
8.  Francis Hubbard, b. 1820
9.  Nancy Green, b. 1822, d. 1840
10. Jeremiah Dudley, b. 1825 d. 1864 in the Civil War

Source:

Essex Institute Historical Collections, Volume 38, page 66

See also:
Francis Lyford of Boston and Exeter and some of his descendants, by William Lewis Welch, 1902



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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday ~ Two Lyford Children buried at Pittsfield, New Hampshire", Nutfield Genealogy, posted June 19, 2018, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/06/tombstone-tuesday-two-lyford-children.html: accessed [access date]).

Monday, June 18, 2018

Colonial Boston in Miniature and in Giant Murals (in the same spot!)

1622 William Blaxton on the Shawmut Peninsula

On Newbury Street, right across from the New England Historic Genealogical Society, is the old New England Life Building.  It is known as The Newbry today. The main entrance is on 501 Boylston Street, but if you enter by the Newbury Street side and look to your left and to your right, there are four small dioramas set into the walls.  Each tiny masterpiece displays a scene from the origins of colonial Boston.  At the Boylston Street entrance is a massive lobby with eight murals showing Boston History up until the Revolutionary War (1622 – 1798).



The Boston Society of Natural History existed from 1830  until 1948 in Boston.  It was located in the financial district, and in 1864 it moved to 234 Berkeley Street in the new Back Bay neighborhood created by a massive landfill project.  The society evolved later into what is now the Boston Museum of Science, and removed from Back Bay to Cambridge.

These four intricate dioramas were built for the Boston Society of Natural History in 1863.  This museum was right on this block at the corner of Boylston and Berkeley Streets, and it is now recently the Louis Boston building, and is now a branch store of Restoration Hardware.  These miniature scenes were created by a woman, Sarah Ann Rockwell, and the painted backgrounds were done by Henry Brooks.  The first diorama displays a scene from pre-colonial contact, with Native Americans setting fish weirs in Back Bay. The second shows William Blaxton (AKA Blackstone) and his little settlement on the Shawmut peninsula. The third shows workers filling in Back Bay in 1858.  The fourth shows the miniature Boston Society of Natural History building described above, and Rogers Hall, which was the first MIT building in Back Bay (1866 – 1938).

Native American fishing weirs in Back Bay

1858 filling in Back Bay

1866 The Boston Society of Natural Science and MIT's Rogers Building
 According to the book Boston Curiosities, Sarah Ann Rockwell was a perfectionist.  She took two weeks to make a human diorama figure and a month to make a tiny horse. She researched the history of Back Bay, and even used original blueprints of the buildings in the fourth diorama to create the mini structures.

Charles Constantin Joseph Hoffbauer (1875 – 1957) was a French born Beaux Arts artist who worked for Disney and created several famous murals, including the mural inside the Battle Abbey in Richmond, Virginia started in 1913, and finished after he served for France in World War I.  Hoffbauer was hired by New England Life to create the murals for their new lobby.  He spent five months in Boston researching the local history.  Then he painted these murals in Hollywood, California and they were installed in Boston in May 1942 for a convention, then removed for final details and reinstalled four months later.  Hoffbauer became an American citizen in 1941, and later lived in Rockport, Massachusetts.



Building the USS Constitution
The Winthrop Fleet

This lobby is open to the public, but I always ask the guard at the lobby desk for permission to linger and loiter.  Most people rush right past these works of art to the elevators, but if you want to take in all the details you will be here for at least a few minutes, if not more!

For more information:

Boston Curiosities:  Quirky Characters, Roadside Oddities, and other Offbeat Stuff, by Bruce Gellerman and Erik Sherman, Morris Book Publishing, Guilford, CT, 2010.

Charles Hoffbauer at Wikipedia:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Hoffbauer 

(I could find no information about artist Sarah Ann Rockwell online)

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Colonial Boston in Miniature and in Giant Murals (in the same spot!)", Nutfield Genealogy, posted June 18, 2018, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/06/colonial-boston-in-miniature-and-in.html: accessed [access date]).