Saturday, April 30, 2016

Surname Saturday ~ SHAW of Hampton, New Hampshire

The SHAW memorial stone, Founder's Park, Hampton, New Hampshire


There are very few early 1600 immigrants from Cheshire, England.  The non-conformists (Puritans) did not have a strong hold in that part of England.  My 10th great grandfather, Roger Shaw was from Cheshire.  His parents are unknown, but Edgar Joseph Shaw, a descendant, makes some good assumptions about Roger and Mary Shaw of Astbury and Hulme Walfield, Cheshire in a lengthy article in the New England Historical Genealogical Record.  (You can see the source for the article below) Roger Shaw’s oldest children were all baptized in Gawsworth, Cheshire, and his daughter Esther was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1638, which helps to estimate his arrival in New England.  

Roger Shaw (about 1600 – 1661) was made a freeman at Cambridge on 14 March 1638/9.  He bought a house lot and land from John Knight on 21 September 1639.  He must have been popular and literate, because he was elected to be a selectman on 8 November 1641 and also chosen to be town clerk.  The town records are in his handwriting.

Roger Shaw (my 10th great grandfather) removed to New Hampshire and bought land and buildings from John Cross in Hampton on 15 November 1647.  He was chosen to be juror in 1648 and 1649, and on a grand jury in 1651.  He was elected deputy in 1651 and 1652, and selectman on 23 March 1653/4 and constable in 1654.  

Roger Shaw remarried for a second time to Susanna, widow of William Tilton in 1653.  He signed a prenuptial agreement with her (providing for her Tilton sons).  She died on 28 January 1654/5.  Roger Shaw did not remarry, and he acknowledged his Tilton stepsons in his will by distributing 15 acres in Hampton and 5 acres of salt marsh to Samuel Tilton in 1660.  He promised 10 pounds to his wife’s youngest son, Daniel, which was given to Samuel, his guardian.  When Roger Shaw died his will gave bequests to his sons, Joseph and Benjamin Shaw, his daughters Margaret Ward, Ann Fogg, Hester Shaw and Marie Shaw, and to “my son Daniel Tilton”.

More SHAW resources:

New England Historic Genealogical Register, "English Origin of Roger and Ann Shaw",  by Edgar Joseph Shaw,  volume 158 (2004), pages  309 - 318.   This sketch acknowledges and fixes mistakes in previous works such as Savage in Gen. Dict. Of New England.

See also History of Hampton, by Joseph Dow, 1893, Volume II, pages 965 - 975 for genealogy of the early Shaw families in Hampton.

A very good blog post about Roger Shaw by genealogy blogger Jeanie Roberts

My SHAW genealogy:

Generation 1:  Roger Shaw, born about 1600 in England, died 29 May 1661 in Hampton, New Hampshire;  married first to Ann Unknown, mother of his children; married second to Susanna Unknown, widow of William Tilton.  Seven children.

Generation 2: Joseph Shaw, baptized on 12 November 1635 in Gawsworth, Cheshire, England, died 8 November 1720 in Hampton; married on 26 June 1661 in Hampton to Elizabeth Partridge, daughter of William Partridge and Ann Spicer.  She was born 14 February 1642/3 in Salisbury, Massachusetts.  Ten children.

Generation 3:  Elizabeth Shaw, born 23 August 1664 in Hampton Falls, died 17 October 1708 in Kingston, New Hampshire; married on 23 May 1682 in Hampton to Aaron Sleeper as his first wife, son of Thomas Sleeper and Joanna Unknown.  He married her sister, Sarah Shaw, as his second wife.   Ten children.

Generation 4: Moses Sleeper m. Margaret Sanborn
Generation 5:  Hepzibah Sleeper m. Samuel Lane
Generation 6:  Sarah Lane m. Eisha Batchelder
Generation 7:  Jonathan Batchelder m. Nancy Thompson
Generation 8:  George E. Batchelder m. Abigail M. Locke
Generation 9:   George E. Batchelder m. Mary Katharine Emerson
Generation 10:  Carrie Maude Batchelder m. Joseph Elmer Allen
Generation 11:  Stanley Elmer Allen m. Gertrude Matilda Hitchings (My grandparents)


Published under a Creative Commons License

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Surname Saturday ~ SHAW of Hampton, New Hampshire", Nutfield Genealogy, posted April 30, 2016,  ( accessed [access date]). 

No comments:

Post a Comment